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FBM KLCI 1663.44

5.28

KLCI FUTURES 1665.00

5.00

STI 2649.38

45.98

RM/USD 4.2070

CPO RM2544.00

9.00

OIL US$35.10

PP 9974/08/2013 (032820) PENINSULAR MALAYSIA RM1.60 (INCLUSIVE OF 6% GST)

MONDAY FEBRUARY 29, 2016 ISSUE 2113/2016

FINANCIAL DAILY MAKE BETTER DECISIONS

www.theedgemarkets.com 5 HOME BUSINESS

Growing health awareness to give Bioalpha a boost 6 HOME BUSINESS

MyEG shares see choppy trade after foreign-worker freeze

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7 HOME BUSINESS

DIY laundry business gains momentum in tough times

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16 H O M E

CIDB’s construction competition enters final phase 18 C O M M E N T

G20 wants governments doing more and central banks less

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0.19

GOLD US$1220.40

18.40

FBM KLCI 1663.44

5.28

KLCI FUTURES 1665.00

5.00

STI 2649.38

45.98

RM/USD 4.2070

CPO RM2544.00

9.00

OIL US$35.10

0.19

GOLD US$1220.40

18.40

PP 9974/08/2013 (032820) PENINSULAR MALAYSIA RM1.60 (INCLUSIVE OF 6% GST)

MONDAY FEBRUARY 29, 2016 ISSUE 2113/2016

FINANCIAL DAILY MAKE BETTER DECISIONS

PUC Founder’s young honcho passes away 4 HOME BUSINESS

www.theedgemarkets.com 5 HOME BUSINESS

Growing health awareness to give Bioalpha a boost 6 HOME BUSINESS

MyEG shares see choppy trade after foreign-worker freeze 7 HOME BUSINESS

DIY laundry business gains momentum in tough times 8 PROPERT Y SNAPSHOT

Could renting by the hour help hotels?

MISIF LODGES COMPLAINT

with Ministry of Finance

16 H O M E

CIDB’s construction competition enters final phase 18 C O M M E N T

G20 wants governments doing more and central banks less

Steel companies raise concerns about high-handed industry-wide audit. Chester Tay has the story on Page 4.

Give Adenan Satem a strong mandate, says PM 14 HOME

2

M ON DAY FEB RUARY 29, 2 0 16 • TH EEDGE F I N AN C I AL DAI LY

For breaking news updates go to www.theedgemarkets.com

ON EDGE T V www.theedgemarkets.com

On Market Matters: Is Malaysia the next North Korea?

The Edge Communications Sdn Bhd (266980-X)

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Publisher and Group CEO Ho Kay Tat EDITORIAL

For News Tips/Press Releases Tel: 03-7721 8219 Fax: 03-7721 8038 Email: [email protected] Senior Managing Editor Azam Aris Executive Editors Kathy Fong, Jenny Ng, Siow Chen Ming, Surinder Jessy, Ooi Inn Leong Associate Editors R B Bhattacharjee, Joyce Goh, Jose Barrock, Vasantha Ganesan Editors Cindy Yeap, Kang Siew Li Assistant Editors Adeline Paul Raj, Tan Choe Choe Chief Copy Editor Halim Yaacob Senior Copy Editor Melanie Proctor Copy Editors Evelyn Chan, Tham Yek Lee, Tham Kid Cheng Art Director Sharon Khoh Design Team Cheryl Loh, Valerie Chin, Aaron Boudville, Aminullah Abdul Karim, Yong Yik Sheng, Tun Mohd Zafian Mohd Za’abah, Noorain Duasa EDITORIAL ADMINISTRATION

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Arab states face US$94b debt crunch Due to oil slump, slowing growth, rising rates and rating downgrades BY STEFANI A BI ANC HI

DUBAI: Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) countries may struggle to refinance US$94 billion (RM394.8 billion) of debt in the next two years, as the region faces slowing growth, rising rates and rating downgrades, according to HSBC Holdings plc. Oil-rich GCC states have to refinance US$52 billion of bonds and US$42 billion of syndicated loans, mostly in the United Arab Emirates (UAE) and Qatar, HSBC said in an emailed report. The countries also face a fiscal and current account deficit of US$395 billion over the period, it said. Expectations that these funding gaps “will be part financed through the sale of sovereign US dollar debt will complicate efforts to refinance

existing paper that matures in 2016 and 2017”, Simon Williams, HSBC’s chief economist for the Middle East, said in the report. “With the Gulf acting as a single credit market, the refinancing challenge will likely be much more broadly felt” and “compounded by tightening regional liquidity, rising rates and recent downgrades”, he said. GCC states, which collectively produce about a quarter of the world’s oil, are taking unprecedented measures to shore up their public finances, as crude prices struggle to rebound from the lowest levels in 12 years. The countries, which include Saudi Arabia and Oman, have also been hit by a series of rating cuts, while billions of US dollars have been drained from the region’s banking system.

Gulf countries have about US$610 billion outstanding in foreign exchange-denominated bonds and syndicated loans, HSBC said. This includes financial and corporate debt, as well as sovereign debt, mainly in the UAE, Bahrain and Qatar, it said. HSBC is confident that the funding gaps will be covered and expects a “raft” of foreign sovereign bond issuances to fund budget deficits. Any new issuance will have to compete with upcoming refinancing needs, the bank said. Almost half of the maturities due in the next two years are in the banking sector, HSBC said, “suggesting any increase in costs at refinancing could quickly feed through into a broader monetary tightening”. — Bloomberg

Najib will check on people’s welfare in Sarawak BY E D WA R D S UB E N G S T E PH E N

PAKAN: Prime Minister Datuk Seri Najib Razak will continue to visit every nook and corner of Sarawak to check on the welfare of the people. “It is my responsibility as head of the government to do so, irrespective of their race or religion and where they live,” he said. Najib was speaking at a meet-the-people session at Rh Jawang anak Janting in Bukit Sari, a more than a two-hour drive from here. He also wanted to personally see the positive impacts made by various social development projects implemented by the 1Malaysia Sarawak Advisory Council (1MSAC) at the 43-door liban longhouse. The projects include micro hydro power and clean water supply projects and a fire-fighting system designed specifically for longhouses and villages in remote areas. See related story on Page 14

SGX bids for historic Baltic Exchange SINGAPORE: In an attempt to strengthen its foothold in the shipping index and derivatives business, the Singapore Exchange (SGX) has made a non-binding bid to acquire The Baltic Exchange, a historic London institution which provides key data on the maritime world. According to the recent Business Times report, the exchange’s Baltic Dry Index of raw-material shipping costs is what physical and derivative shipping trades are based on; its Baltex platform is where cleared forward contracts can be registered. While some interviewed by The Business Times said a successful bid could complement SGX’s growing freight derivatives business or thrust Singapore into greater prominence as a shipping hub, others wondered whether the bid was more a symbolic statement of SGX’s ambitions. The last high-profile deal involving SGX was in 2011, when its bid for Australia’s ASX was scuttled by Australian politics.

Singapore Exchange joins a number of suitors eager to buy the venerable institution.

This time, SGX joins a number of suitors eager to buy the venerable Baltic. A Reuters report hours before the SGX announcement said firms such as US derivatives exchanges CME Group and ICE, and energy-and-metal data firm Platts, have held discussions with the firm. LME had also tried, but failed to set up a freight derivatives exchange with The Baltic Exchange in 2010.

The Business Times reported that last Friday, the SGX had emphasised that discussions are still preliminary and there is no certainty that a definitive agreement will materialise. The Baltic Exchange said last Friday that it had “received a number of exploratory approaches and is now in confidential discussions with selected third parties regarding its future strategy and ownership”.

Also present were council chairman Datuk Joseph Salang, who is the Julau member of parliament and deputy chief minister Tan Sri Alfred Jabu Numpang. Najib said he was glad that the 1MSAC had to date, implemented a total of 1,431 projects state-wide for the rural populace. “I am very happy to see that projects such as the micro hydro (power) dam can provide ample power supply to enable the people to have a better quality of life. “With constant power source both for lighting and electrical appliances, they can, for instance, use their refrigerators to store food to ensure its freshness for longer period of time.” The prime minister said when the people were more comfortable, they would be more united. Meanwhile, Najib said he would consult the defence ministry on how a certain stretch of the logging road, linking two primary schools in the area, could be upgraded by the military under its “Projek Jiwa Murni”. — Bernama

Malaysia Airlines’ customers can buy Emirates tickets from today

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To order copy Tel: 03-7721 8034 / 8033 Fax: 03-7721 8282 Email: [email protected] TheEdgeProperty.com Managing Director Au Foong Yee Editor Lam Jian Wyn Contributing Editor Sharon Kam Assistant Editor James Chong MARKETING & ADVERTISING

Account Director Sharon Chew (012) 316 5628 BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT

Senior Manager Elizabeth Lay

KUALA LUMPUR: Malaysia Airlines customers will be able to purchase their codeshare flights on Emirates starting today. Enrich members will be able to earn 25% bonus miles on any MH4500-MH4999 codeshare flights operated by Emirates between Feb 22 and April 19, 2016 in conjunction with the launch of the partnership, Malaysia Airlines said in a statement yesterday. The airline marked the start of its codeshare agreement with Emirates

last week, with both carriers placing its codes on the Kuala Lumpur-Dubai route, as well as other routes under the codeshare agreement. The service to Dubai will be operated three times a day on a Boeing 777 and once a day on an Airbus A380. The agreement, announced in early December 2015, is one of Malaysia Airlines’ largest codeshare agreements and opens up a host of new destinations for customers. For Malaysia Airlines’ custom-

ers, this will include over 30 South American and European destinations, including Rome, Paris, Zurich, Geneva, Stockholm, Madrid and Barcelona, which will be introduced progressively over the next few weeks as regulatory approvals are obtained, the airlines’ said. “The Malaysia Airlines and Emirates codeshare is an integral part of our future network plan as we focus on getting our customers connected globally. We are pleased to launch the collaboration and we

are confident that our customers will benefit from this agreement,” Malaysia Airlines chief commercial officer Paul Simmons said. Emirates executive vice-president and chief commercial officer Thierry Antinori said the codeshare agreement will provide “offer travellers from across Emirates’ global network convenient access into Malaysia and to a number of destinations within Malaysia Airlines’ extensive Asia-Pacific network.” — Bernama

M O N DAY F E B RUA RY 29 , 2016 • T HEED G E FINA NCIA L DA I LY

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4 HOME BUSINESS

M ON DAY FEB RUARY 29, 2 0 16 • TH EEDGE F I N AN C I AL DAI LY

Misif lodges complaint with MoF Steel firms raise concerns about high-handed industry-wide audit BY C H ESTER TAY

KUALA LUMPUR: The Malaysian Iron and Steel Industry Federation (Misif) has lodged a complaint with the ministry of finance (MoF) on concerns raised by its members regarding the industry-wide audit that was conducted in a high-handed manner of the steel industry last week. In a letter addressed to Deputy Finance Minister Datuk Chua Tee Yong, Misif noted that the industry-wide audit, which had so far raided 12 of its members including six listed companies, had resulted in the freezing of bank accounts, and confiscation of mobile phones. As long-standing manufacturers, Misif said its members' operations would not abscond. It asserted that the initial audit investigations should be conducted under the Customs Act 1967, which does not involve the need for heavy weapons, and not under the Anti-Money Laundering Act (AMLA). “Our members are bona fide manufacturers that have continued to contribute significantly to the development and well-being of the national economy since several

decades ago,” Misif said in the letter sighted by The Edge Financial Daily. “In view of the above, we seek the urgent attention and assistance from Yang Berhormat to address the ongoing predicaments, especially the freezing of accounts, facing the steel companies,” it added. Among the companies raided are Amalgamated Industrial Steel Bhd (AISB), Alpine Pipe Manufacturing Sdn Bhd (account frozen) and Hiap Teck Hardware Sdn Bhd (both subsidiaries of Hiap Teck Venture Bhd), PPI Industries Sdn Bhd (account frozen) (subsidiary of Wah Seong Corp Bhd), Ann Joo Metal Sdn Bhd and Anshin Steel Service Centre Sdn Bhd (both subsidiaries of Ann Joo Resources Bhd), Tashin Steel Sdn Bhd and Prestar Steel Pipe Sdn Bhd (both subsidiaries of Prestar Resources Bhd), and Southern Pipe Industry Sdn Bhd (subsidiary of Southern Steel Bhd). The raids were conducted by the Royal Malaysian Customs Department together with other government departments such as the Royal Malaysian Police, the MoF and the Attorney-General's Chambers of Malaysia last week. Misif said its members had raised

concerns about the “high-handed” manner of the “audit”, which included heavy weapons, the confiscation of mobile phones and switching off of CCTVs within the premises during the visit. “As responsible corporate citizens and manufacturers, our members will extend [the] full cooperation to the authorities for such visits, but not to the extent that their reputation and image are put at stake when no wrongdoing or offence has yet to be determined by the authorities. Staff morale and implications for joint-venture investments would also be adversely affected,” Misif said. The association also noted that the freezing of accounts would affect its members' investor confidence and company reputation, especially public-listed companies. In a filing with Bursa Malaysia last week, Hiap Teck confirmed that the customs had taken custody of certain documents of two of its subsidiaries, and frozen a bank account of one of the two subsidiaries “for purposes of audit and investigation”. Hiap Teck revealed that it is currently seeking legal advice on the matter.

PUC Founder’s young honcho passes away

PATRICK GOH

BY L IE W J IA T E N G

JACK Cheong Chia Chieh, 45, the head honcho of PUC Founder (MSC) Bhd passed away over the weekend. When contacted by The Edge Financial Daily, PUC Founder confirmed that Cheong died of illness on Saturday night. Cheong was admitted to the Subang Jaya Medical Centre early this month due to his deteriorating health condition, according to people who were close to him. Cheong was the Bursa Malaysia’s ACE Market- listed firm’s managing director and substantial shareholder holding a 41.58% stake through Resource Holdings Management Ltd (RHML). Cheong took control of PUC Founder in January 2014 through a reverse takeover exercise by injecting Red Media Asia Ltd into PUC Founder for RM90 million in exchange for 750 million new shares in PUC Founder at an issue price of 12 sen apiece. Red Media is a company that specialises in media and advertising businesses. Cheong was appointed managing director on Jan 1, 2014. He was the head honcho of the company. He was the only executive director on the company’s board. Cheong stepped up efforts to grow PUC Founder by jumping onto the solar energy bandwagon. In March last year, the company’s wholly-owned subsidiary MaxGreen Energy Sdn Bhd was

Cheong was appointed managing director on Jan 1, 2014.

awarded a feed-in-tariff approval holder by the Sustainable Energy Development Authority Malaysia to develop and operate a solar photovoltaic plant with a capacity of 1mw, from which electricity output will be supplied to Tenaga Nasional Bhd at a fixed rate. He was also group managing director of RHML, the ultimate holding company of PUC Founder. RHML and its subsidiaries were formed in 2007, followed by RHML’s listing on the London Stock Exchange’s Alternative Investment Market in 2008. In 2009, he was awarded The World Chinese Young Entrepreneurs Award at the sixth World Summit of Chinese Entrepreneurs and The Emerging Category Award of Malaysia’s Ernst & Young Entrepreneur.

Can Padini continue to beat the odds? Padini Holdings Bhd’s net profit RM mil

15 10

33.07

31.83

26.59 18.18

19.24

20

16.21

25

13.66

30

28.4

40 35

Padini Holdings Bhd RM 2.3

Vol (mil) 6

45

21.11

KUALA LUMPUR: The retailing industry has been smarting from the implementation of the goods and services tax since last April, with revenue falling, impacting earnings. Going by the record low consumer sentiment index of 63.8 points in December — not to mention that consumer prices in January rose 3.5% from a year earlier — consumer spending may well remain weak, going forward. However, for local retail groups like Padini Holdings Bhd and Jerasia Capital Bhd — the latter is the distributor of the Mango brand of outfits — their earnings have remained relatively strong despite the headwinds. Padini’s quarterly profit, for one, doubled in its latest second quarter ended Dec 31, 2015 (2QFY16) to RM33.07 million from RM16.21 million a year ago, thanks to the continued expansion of its distribution network, which saw 13 Padini Concept Stores and Brand Outlet stores opening between the end of 2QFY15 and 2QFY16. Nevertheless, there remains a concern that consumers will continue to tighten their belts amid the less-than-rosy economic climate. But Padini, whose share price has

gained as much as 79 sen or 58.1%, while its earnings seem the least impacted, appears unfazed. It closed seven sen or 3.37% higher at RM2.15 last Friday, valuing it at RM1.4 billion. Just a few days earlier, the stock hit its record high of RM2.18 on Feb 23. Analysts, by and large, think Padini’s near-term earnings prospects remain positive. “The company’s near-term earnings growth will be supported by its existing outlets and new openings. We believe the aggressive store expansion and its pricing strategies could boost its earnings growth onwards,” a local bank-backed research firm analyst told The Edge Financial Daily when contacted. Padini expects to add another five new stores — two Padini Concept Stores and three Brands Outlet stores — by the end of its FY16 ending June 30 — one in Ipoh, Perak, with two each in Kota Baru, Kelantan, and Shah Alam, Selangor, according to Padini executive director Chan Kwai Heng in an email to The Edge Financial Daily. “We will continue with policies that will drive top-line growth, while holding prices steady. The distribution network must be expanded not just in size, but also in geographical and market reach,” Chan said.

27.74

BY GHO C H EE Y UAN

RM2.15

5

2.1

4

1.9

3

1.7

2

1.5

1

1.3

1Q 2Q 3Q 4Q 1Q 2Q 3Q 4Q 1Q 2Q FY14

FY15

FY16

1.1

0

Jan 30, 2015

But some cautioned that earnings growth for Padini may be less exciting going forward, as the company’s margin is expected to face pressure due to heated competition and higher input costs. Chan, however, is confident that falling margins can be compensated by higher sales through the group’s push for top-line growth. Meanwhile, in terms of valuations, some analysts view that Padini is now fairly valued. “Padini is currently trading at 12.9 times of its price-earnings ratio and we believe the current valuation is fair and has been reflected in the share price given the share price rally since last year,” one analyst said. Further, he estimated that Padini’s

Feb 26, 2016

earnings will ease off in 4QFY16, as he reasoned that the quarter “is a seasonally slower quarter for retailers”. Kenanga Research, however, thinks better things are yet to come for Padini. In a Feb 24 note, the research house said Padini will be well-positioned to ride on the upwave with the advantage of a wider store reach when macroeconomic headwinds simmer down, and consumer sentiment recovers. “Due to better-than-expected results and outlook, we are upgrading our estimated increase in samestore-sales growth (SSSG) for the Padini brands to 22.8% in FY16 from

our pre-revised SSSG of 18.8%. This improves our FY16 and FY17 net profits by 3.3% and 2.8%,” it said. As such, though the research house maintained its “market perform” call on Padini, it raised its target price (TP) to RM2.21 from RM1.82. AllianceDBS Research, however, downgraded Padini to “hold” from “buy”, given that the stock has hit its TP of RM2.16 in the strong run-up of its share price recently. While it acknowledged that Padini had posted strong 2QFY16 results, it noted that its gross profit margin for 2QFY16 had dropped to 40% (1QFY16: 46%, 2QFY15: 41%) due to an extensive discounting during the year-end sales promotion period, and more expensive merchandise brought in due to the weaker ringgit. “We believe the strong 2QFY16 results will leave room for consensus to upgrade its FY16 earnings forecasts. Nonetheless, we deem the results to be within our expectations, as we expect weaker second-half (2HFY16) results relative to 1HFY16. As such, we are maintaining our FY16/FY17 earnings estimates,” it said. Key risks, it added, are weaker-than-expected consumer spending and an increasingly competitive industry landscape.

HOME BUSINESS 5

M ON DAY F E B RUA RY 29 , 2016 • T HEED G E FINA NCIA L DA I LY

Growing health awareness to give Bioalpha a boost Its revenue likely to increase by double digits over next three years, says MD BY GHO C H EE Y UA N

KUALA LUMPUR: Increasing costs of healthcare, paired with growing consciousness among consumers of preventative healthcare, are turning people towards supplement products. And herbal and health supplement manufacturers like Bioalpha Holdings Bhd look set to benefit from this. According to its managing director (MD) William Hon Tian Kok, the Bursa Malaysia’s ACE Market-listed company is likely to increase its revenue by double digits over the next three years. It posted a 9.6% revenue rise to RM29.7 million in the financial year ended Dec 31, 2015 (FY15), from RM27.1 million in FY14. “Both the ageing population and the illness rate are on the rise, which have driven demand for health supplement products,” he told The Edge Financial Daily in an interview recently. “Prevention is better than cure. People are more willing to spend RM200 per month on supplement products in view of costlier medical bills,” said Hon, who is a major shareholder with a 17.21% stake in the group. In a report dated Jan 27, CIMB Research pointed out that the local health supplement market is mainly dominated by imports. “Imports of health supplements in Malaysia were close to RM5 billion in 2013. This compared with sales of the domestic healthcare supplement manufacturing industry of around RM700 million in the same period. “Today, there are more than 130

domestic health supplement producers in the country and Bioalpha’s market share is about 3% to 4%,” said CIMB Research. As a relatively young company, Hon said Bioalpha has a huge growth potential and the group will expand aggressively over the next few years. Bioalpha has two manufacturing plants in Bangi and Semenyih, Selangor, which are running at 50% of total capacity utilisation. The current capacity is able to cope with rising demand for the next three years, said Hon. “We are in talks with several multinational corporations (MNCs) for new original design manufacturer (ODM) contracts. Assuming we can come out with a product that is accepted by two or three MNCs, it can easily translate into [an] additional revenue of between RM4 million and RM5 million for the group,” he said. Presently, about 60% of the group’s revenue comes from house brands, with the rest from ODM. Hon said the group’s research and development team is also in the midst of developing next-generation health supplement products that are good for human consumption. “We are planting papaya leaves in our own herb farm in Terengganu to help dengue patients,” he added. He said the group had lined up new products comprising beauty and whitening, respiratory and antioxidants for launch this year. “Currently, we have six medical mushrooms ready for commercial production, including the top seller — cordyceps sinensis and a medical mushroom that has been

marketed since 2008. “We have also started marketing the second medical mushroom [known as] the tiger milk mushroom, traditionally used to cure respiratory problems,” he said. Hon said Bioalpha also plans to expand its pharmacy network through merger and acquisition (M&A) exercises, and open new retail outlets, in a bid to double sales of its in-house products. “We are in talks with several individual pharmacies and retail pharmacy chains for a proposed M&A,” said Hon. The opening of new retail and pharmacy outlets will be primarily located in the Klang Valley and Johor. Currently, Bioalpha has one retail pharmacy outlet called “LifeSprings” at Solaris Mont Kiara here. It is also the operator of 12 Mediconstant pharmacies after acquiring the chain from Ng See Hein and Loh Peng Yeow for RM5 million last year. Hon said all future expansions will be under the brand of Mediconstant, which is a well-known brand in the market. “Retailing business is interesting and the acquisition of Mediconstant Holding Sdn Bhd [in December last year] is expected to provide synergies to our existing healthcare supplement manufacturing business and reduce marketing costs,” he said. “It also allows us to reach the end customers faster with any new developed product formulations, as in-house marketing would generate greater awareness than through third-party retail pharmacies,” he added.

Hon: Prevention is better than cure. People are more willing to spend RM200 per month on supplement products in view of costlier medical bills. Photo by Shahrin Yahya

Bioalpha has also set up a 70:30 joint venture with MyAngkasa Holdings Sdn Bhd, the country’s largest cooperative organisation, to establish a chain of retail outlets nationwide. “Under the plan, we will offer a business opportunity to the cooperative members to invest in our pharmacy outlets through franchising, so that we will be able to recover our invested capital. “But we will still have ultimate control over the operations and we collect a certain amount of management fees from them,” he added. “MyAngkasa currently has around 12,000 cooperatives nationwide and eight million members. We also plan to invite individual members of the cooperatives to be members of Mediconstant’s

chain of pharmacies with certain membership privileges,” he added. Bioalpha is 51.4%-owned by the finance ministry, of which 22.4% is held via Khazanah Nasional Bhd. Permodalan Nasional Bhd also owns a 16.69% stake in the group. The group’s revenue has grown at a 20% compound annual growth rate over the past five years. For the fourth quarter ended Dec 31, 2015 (4QFY15), it posted a 47.3% jump in net profit to RM3.83 million from RM2.6 million a year ago, while revenue rose 16.2% to RM9.71 million from RM8.35 million in 4QFY14, mainly due to higher exports of its herbal products to China. CIMB Research expects Bioalpha’s net profit to grow 65% over the next two years. “Excluding 2015’s RM2.3 million initial public offering (IPO) expenses, net profit growth over the next two years should be around 40% per year,” the research firm said, adding that stronger-than-expected China sales, more pharmacies to be opened or an unexpected blockbuster product could be potential upsides to its earnings. CIMB Research has an “add” recommendation on the stock, with a target price of 65 sen, based on 19.2 times 2017 price-earnings ratio. Bioalpha started trading on Bursa Malaysia in April last year, with an IPO price of 20 sen. It hit a record high of 48 sen barely a week after listing, and has been trading in its 52-week range of 33 sen to 34 sen. The stock closed one sen or 3.08% higher at 33.5 sen last Friday, with a market capitalisation of RM167.5 million.

‘UMW Oil & Gas to remain in the red until FY18’ BY A L EX CHON G

KUALA LUMPUR: UMW Oil & Gas Corp Bhd (UMW-OG), which reported its maiden annual net loss of RM372.3 million in the financial year ended Dec 31, 2015 (FY15), is unlikely to reverse its fortunes anytime soon, analysts said, given the challenging operational environment. Some analysts, who had earlier expected the drilling and oilfield service arm of UMW Holdings Bhd with a 55.2% stake to register marginal profit for FY15, are revising their forecasts to assume that the group’s net loss will widen in FY16, and stay loss-making until FY18. This doesn’t bode well for its share price, which is trading 65% below its initial public offering price of RM2.80 on Nov 1, 2013. The stock closed 2.08% higher at 98 sen last Friday, giving it a market capitalisation of RM2.12 billion. Affin Hwang Investment Bank Bhd has cut its FY16 to FY17 fore-

casts for UMW-OG to a loss, after reducing its utilisation and charter rate assumptions for its jack-up rigs. “Our revised forecasts assume UMW-OG’s core net loss will widen 198% to RM130.7 million in FY16 (from RM43.9 million in FY15), and stay loss-making from FY17 to FY18,” it said last Wednesday. Affin Hwang has cut its target price (TP) to 75 sen from 89 sen for the stock, indicating a 29% downside risk, based on an unchanged 0.5 times 2016 price-to-book ratio, while maintaining its “sell” rating. BIMB Securities Research is more optimistic, expecting UMW-OG to book a small net profit of RM25 million in FY16, and double the figure in FY17 to RM44.8 million. Taking into consideration that half of UMW-OG’s drilling rigs are still idle, it has cut its forecasts by 80% and 71% for FY16 and FY17, respectively. “The contract for the provision of Naga 4 will not be extended, which

will effectively expire in March, bringing UMW-OG’s operating rig count to a mere three units (Naga 1, 7 and 8),” BIMB Securities Research said. The firm pointed to the non-working rigs comprising Naga 2,3,4,5 and 6, adding that longerterm earnings delivery by UMW-OG seems to be in question. “We cut our FY16 forecasts by 80%, as we assume lower utilisation days from 220 to 180 days for the current idle Naga 2,3,5,6 and soon out-of-job Naga 4, and tweaked our margins lower to 11% from 17% previously. For FY17, we lowered our earnings by 71% after assuming lower utilisation days and margin assumption from 20% to 13%,” said BIMB Securities Research, maintaining a “sell” call on UMW-OG, with a lower TP of 78 sen from 91 sen previously. Last Tuesday, UMW-OG swung to a net loss of RM372.3 million in FY15, compared to a net profit of RM252 million in the previous year,

weighed down by deterioration in time charter rates and falling utilisation of the group’s jack-up rigs. Revenue fell 17.3% to RM839.5 million from RM1.01 billion in FY14. Although the upstream oil and gas player was expected to post weaker earnings, the magnitude of the loss was way below the consensus forecast of RM19 million in net profit. It blamed the massive loss to impairment and write-off charges totalling RM337.7 million on its rigs, goodwill and oilfield service assets, which reflected persistent depressed oil prices that impacted demand for the group’s rigs and services. But even stripping the exceptional items off, UMW-OG would still post a core net loss of RM68.1 million, largely due to a 60.3% drop in drilling service revenue and start-up expenses for two newly delivered rigs. AllianceDBS Research is of the view that the weak drilling market will persist, expecting recov-

ery to take another two to three years, which may be accelerated if crude oil prices recover and stabilise above US$60 (RM252) per barrel. While it expects UMW-OG to remain in the red in FY16, Maybank IB Research takes a contrarian view that the current selldown of its shares may offer buying opportunities. Following UMW-OG’s kitchen-sinking exercise in the fourth quarter of 2015, the brokerage house believes the bad results and tough outlook for rigs have been priced in, and is reiterating its “trading buy” call, with a lower TP of RM1.16 from RM1.25 previously. “The outlook for rigs is tough, at least in the first half of 2016, and UMW-OG is expected to remain in the red, but this bearish sentiment has been priced in. Securing charter remains the key in 2016, at the expense of daily charter rates. As such, we expect UMW-OG to be P&L (profit and loss) negative but cash flow positive,” said Maybank IB Research.

6 HOME BUSINESS

Tan: Unearthing talents is key in ensuring we have among the best people in the industry. Photo by Sam Fong

Following news that foreign workers’ recruitment has been frozen

FY11 FY12 FY13 FY14 FY15

28.5

60.74

141.52

109.87

76.48

50.11

160 140 120 100 80 60 40 20 0

Revenue

68.14

Net profit RM mil

66.92

KUALA LUMPUR: Shares in My EG Services Bhd (MyEG) saw some choppy trade following news that the government had frozen recruitment of foreign workers. Its share price is down 7% from its five-year high of RM2.30 on Jan 11. News that the government had decided to suspend the recruitment of all foreign workers to Malaysia as it reviews the current pool of foreign labour in the country sent MyEG’s share price tumbling nearly 5% to close at RM2.06 on Feb 19 as investors were worried that the freeze would affect the e-government service provider’s earnings outlook. It closed three sen or 1.39% lower at RM2.13 last Friday, giving it a market capitalisation of RM5.12 billion. Analysts, however, believe that it is a knee-jerk reaction, with CIMB Research advising investors to take this short-term share price weakness as an opportunity to accumulate the stock. “The news [of the foreign worker freeze] is negative as investors have been factoring in [the] income stream from higher foreign labour registration via new intakes or the amnesty programme. There could be some follow-through modest selling pressure,” UOB-Kay Hian head of research Vincent Khoo told The Edge Financial Daily. However, he opined that the negative impact is likely to be temporary, as the suspension will be eventually lifted given Malaysia’s labour requirement. MyEG on Feb 11 announced that it had been appointed by the home ministry to manage the rehiring programme for illegal foreign workers. This was an enhancement contract

MyEG Services Bhd’s financial performance

34.82

BY TAN S I E W M U NG

58.83

KUALA LUMPUR: A team of four Malaysian students emerged as champion of the inaugural Southeast Asia Deloitte Tax Challenge (SEA DTC) 2016, which challeng participants to dig deep into their tax knowledge, while also honing their writing, speaking and presentation skills. Team TaxWiz from Tunku Abdul Rahman University College, comprising of Thiban Raj Arumugam, Angelina Tai Fern Jian, Chiang Weizheng and Rupina Kangasothy, took home the RM8,000 cash prize. “It’s really unexpected that we won. We are very honoured. The main factor in winning the challenge was the teamwork we had,” said Thiban. Angelina said her team members supported each other, while Rupina highlighted that it was important that no single speaker overshadowed the rest of the team members. Meanwhile, Phua Kuan Hua from the Singapore Management University won the first place under the individual category, which earned him a RM5,000 cash prize. He was also named the “Best Writer”, which brought him another RM1,000 cash prize. Overall, RM21,500 in prize money and awards — sponsored by the Association of Chartered Certified Accountants (ACCA) Malaysia and Wolters Kluwer CCH — were presented to the winners in both the individual and group categories, which, besides the Best Presenter and Best Writer awards, included their respective merit awards as well. The Fifth Avenue team from Thammasat University, Thailand, was named the first runner-up in the group category, and took home with it a cash prize of RM4,000. Mah Wen Jian from University of Tunku Abdul Rahman, Malaysia, was the first runner-up in the individual category, which rewarded

him a RM2,500 cash prize. Participants had to undergo intense presentation training facilitated by presenters from the ACCA, BFM89.9 and Deloitte last Thursday before the competition itself last Friday, whereby participants had to analyse a two-part case study and present their solutions within a 20-minute presentation, after a one-and-a-halfhour preparation. “Deloitte Malaysia is extremely proud to have hosted the inaugural SEA DTC 2016, which aims at cultivating and enriching the next generation of tax professionals in the region,” Deloitte Malaysia managing director Yee Wing Peng said during the event. Held annually at the national level in Malaysia since 2008, the Deloitte Tax Challenge brought in a record turnout of 2,667 participants last year. This year marks the first year the competition goes regional, and with it came participants not only from Malaysia, but Singapore, Thailand and Indonesia as well — some 3,054 altogether. “It has indeed grown in participation and stature — from the first challenge in 2008, where 800 participants competed, till the 2015 edition, where a record 2,667 challengers from 47 top-ranked higher-learning institutions took part. Unearthing talents is key in ensuring we have among the best people in the industry. The challenge has been instrumental not only in enabling us to identify top talents, but also in raising the stature of the accounting profession as a whole,” Deloitte Malaysia country managing partner Tan Theng Hooi shared.

27.33

BY A H MA D NAQ I B IDR IS

MyEG shares see choppy trade

22.13

Malaysian team takes top spot in SEA Deloitte Tax Challenge

M ON DAY FEB RUARY 29, 2 0 16 • TH EEDGE F I N AN C I AL DAI LY

1Q FY16

to the appointment letter dated Sept 4, 2015. The group had told Bursa Malaysia that this project would take effect from Feb 15 to Aug 15, and was expected to contribute positively to its earnings for the financial years ending June 30, 2016 and 2017. No value was disclosed, as MyEG said “it is dependent on the number of illegal foreign workers successfully registered”. “There is no official data on the number of illegal workers in Malaysia, but it is believed to be in the range of two million to four million. While the number of illegal workers to be legalised by the government is unclear now, it should not be lesser than the number recorded under the previous 6P programme of 1.3 million workers,” said Khoo. “Based on our rough estimate, processing one million illegal workers could lift MyEG’s revenue by RM100 million,” he added. Khoo also recognised that the potential contribution from the illegal worker registration is “significant”, estimating that by handling one million illegal worker registrations, net profit could come in at RM50 mil-

lion (trailing-12-month net profit: RM84 million). As for the courier service licence, he is of the view that the contribution would be small at the beginning stage, but this is a low-hanging fruit for MyEG as it is tapping its existing infrastructure (delivery of road tax) to run this new business. However, Khoo opined that these near-term prospects had already been priced in. “We note that there could be other potential earnings growth angles, such as its tie-up with Celcom Axiata Bhd in providing SIM cards to foreign workers. “MyEG’s share price would be sustainable should it show its capability in rolling out its new projects on hand,” Khoo added. He believes that MyEG has thus far shown its ability to clinch contracts and execute its contracts smoothly. “Prospects remain positive. Opportunities lie in its ability to build more value-added services for its growing database of customers,” he said. For CIMB Research, it believes that investors should take this short-term share price weakness as an opportunity to accumulate MyEG shares. “Potential rerating catalysts include stronger-than-expected registration of illegal foreign workers and [a] successful launch of the Customs Service Tax Monitoring project in mid-2016,” it said in a note to clients on Feb 21. MyEG more than doubled its net profit in the first quarter ended Sept 30, 2015 (1QFY16) to RM28.5 million from RM12.04 million a year ago, on the back of a 119% increase in revenue to RM60.74 million from RM27.72 million in 1QFY15.

Oceancash’s non-woven unit to drive growth in 2016 BY L AW Y I N- LY N

KUALA LUMPUR: Oceancash Pacific Bhd, a felt and non-woven product manufacturer, which saw its net profit and revenue rise by 81.6% and 9.1% respectively last year, expects to sustain its positive momentum in 2016, albeit at a slower pace, driven by growth in its non-woven division that will help cushion a slowdown in its felt division. Its group general manager Lor Seng Thee said the outlook for the felt segment is challenging in 2016, as the regional automotive market, a key contributor to its revenue, is expected to slow down. Still, he hopes to maintain the division’s performance in 2016 at last year's level. The Bursa Malaysia’s ACE Market-listed

company produces felt for heat and sound insulation in vehicles. Lor said the felt segment in Malaysia derives a third of its revenue from the local auto industry, while the air-conditioning and export markets contribute the remaining twothirds. The group is bullish about its non-woven division’s prospects, with revenue projected to grow 10% this year, compared with 14.8% in 2015, according to its co-founder and chief executive officer Tan Siew Chin. Tan said growth in the non-woven segment will be underpinned by prospective new customers and increased orders. Oceancash aims to capture some big names in 2016. He added that the group is currently in talks with a multinational corporation, which would make a

“significant” contribution to the division if a deal is clinched. Its felt division produces resonated and thermoplastic felt for application in the auto and air-conditioning industries, while the non-woven division manufactures fabrics used in the hygiene industry, which Tan said is fairly recession-proof. “Worldwide, the usage of disposable hygienic products is continuously increasing,” he said. Oceancash exports over 80% of its non-woven products, with Japan being its largest market, followed by Thailand, Indonesia and China. Tan said Oceancash will spend about RM4 million on capital expenditure this year, mainly to buy a new spooling machine for the non-woven division to upgrade its

production capability to cater for a wider range of products. He said the group has five production lines at its non-woven plant in Malaysia, running at 75% to 88% of capacity. The four production lines at its felt plants in Malaysia and Indonesia are running at a lower 50% capacity utilisation rate, owing to a slowdown in the auto markets of Indonesia and Thailand. Lor said the Indonesian operation is running with one production line, as Oceancash is in the midst of commissioning the second line after moving into its new factory in Cikarang from Bekasi and expects it to commence production in a month. Previously, Oceancash planned to expand its business operations to

Thailand, and relocate one of its two production lines from Malaysia to the country. But the expansion did not materialise, and Lor said the group is now re-evaluating the option. Founded in 1997, Oceancash’s net profit has been increasing steadily from RM1.81 million in the financial year ended Dec 31, 2010 (FY10) to RM8.92 million in FY15. Net profit nearly doubled from RM4.91 million in FY14, thanks to higher sales, foreign-exchange gain and the group incurring a one-off loss of RM1.69 million on the disposal of a PE modular machine in the third quarter of 2014. Revenue for FY15 grew 9.1% to RM79.43 million from RM72.81 million in FY14, on higher non-woven sales to Thailand and Japan.

HOME BUSINESS 7

M ON DAY F E B RUA RY 29 , 2016 • T HEED G E FINA NCIA L DA I LY

DIY laundry business gains momentum in tough times 30 Bubblelab, five Wash Studio outlets to open in 2016 BY SU PRI YA SU REN DRAN

KUALA LUMPUR: The self-service or do-it-yourself (DIY) laundry business is one that offers an interesting proposition in tough economic times. It serves as a business opportunity for the cautious investor, while catering to the needs of the low- to middle-income groups who rely on the service. Perhaps that is why it isn’t surprising that such DIY laundry stores are cropping up all around town. With coin- or token-operated machines, these stores are gaining popularity — most outlets also offer free Wi-Fi services to keep patrons amused while waiting for their loads to be done. The appeal of the DIY laundry business has also attracted the interest of Bursa Malaysia-listed JAG Bhd. The company, which is principally involved in total waste management services as well as information technology services, in September last year announced that it will be diversifying into the DIY laundry business through a tie-up between its wholly-owned subsidiary Jaring Metal Industries Sdn Bhd (JMI) and Bubblelab Laundry Sdn Bhd.

JMI owns 80% of the venture, while Bubblelab and its director Kenny Wong hold 10% each. JAG executive director Datuk Ng Meow Giak said the group intends to open 30 more Bubblelab outlets this year. “We have opened seven outlets as at end-2015, and the results have been positive. We plan to open 30 more in 2016, starting from April. As for contributions, we do not expect the business to contribute to our bottom line currently [for the financial year ended Dec 31, 2015], as Bubblelab is in a growing phase. “Having said that, we are happy to note that all our new outlets opened in 2015 are currently enjoying healthy cash flows. We are confident that this business segment will result in positive returns for JAG’s investment,” he said in an email response to The Edge Financial Daily. Another aggressive player in the DIY laundry business is privately-owned Duo Art Resources Sdn Bhd, which operates the Wash Studio outlets and is the authorised distributor of Speed Queen, a US-based brand for commercial washers and dryers.

Tan: Basically, this business has flourished in Malaysia due to the ‘no time and no space factors’. Photo by Sam Fong

The company has 20 Wash Studio outlets under its belt. It plans to increase this number to 25 outlets by the first quarter of this year. Duo Art director Deric Tan estimated that the self-service laundry industry had grown from approximately 800 to 1,000 outlets nationwide today, a tally that combines both franchised outlets and individual operators. “Basically, this business has flourished in Malaysia due to the

‘no time and no space factors’. No time because most households now depend on a dual-income arrangement where both the husband and wife work, while there is no space in the homes of the lower- to middle-income groups, as units are getting smaller due to limitations of affordability. “As a result, consumers are seeking alternatives to help them alleviate these constraints in a cost-effective and convenient way. Hence, the high demand for DIY laundry services,” he told The Edge Financial Daily in a recent interview. On an investment perspective, Tan said higher-income groups may see the DIY laundry business as a viable business option to grow their wealth, especially in the face of inflation and volatility in the local economy. “This business serves as a safety net among the higher-income workforce. A typical operation in [the] Klang Valley can enjoy a profit margin of 50%. Plus, there is no inventory management involved and minimal human intervention [is] required, [thus little to no labour costs],” Tan said of how a typical laundry franchise system works.

Tan, who hails from a marketing background and was previously attached to a few renowned fast-moving consumer goods companies, also shared that Wash Studio serves as a one-stop solution provider to keen investors who wish to go into the business by way of franchise. A basic business set-up in the Klang Valley, comprising six washers and four dryers, requires an initial capital outlay of about RM276,000, inclusive of the goods and services tax. Investors will need to register a company before taking on the venture, said Tan. “Our services start from identifying the right location to designing the shop layout, and implementing the renovation, peripheral and machine installation. We also obtain the business licence as well as conduct training on operations. “Post-opening, we assist business operators with a 24-hour helpline on machine maintenance and other day-to-day operations ... our system is fully equipped with automatic detergent dispensers, while our detergent, softener and sanitisers come complete with halal certification,” said Tan.

Vuclip sees Malaysia as its regional springboard BY KAMARUL ANWAR

KUALA LUMPUR: Asians love Korean dramas. It’s not rocket science, but Vuclip founder and chief executive officer Nickhil Jakatdar said it did take “a lot” of PhD holders, eight years and hundreds of terabytes (a terabyte to 1,000 gigabytes) of data mined from consumers every day to validate the notion. A notion that has now culminated in Vuclip’s Viu, an over-the-top (OTT) video and music content player which partners Korean and regional broadcasters, and content providers. The company is owned by Hong Kong telecommunications group PCCW Ltd, which the son of billionaire Li Ka-Shing, Richard, owns about 28% through Pacific Century Group. Calling Silicon Valley, California, home, Vuclip aims to be the leading video-streaming provider in Southeast Asia, India, Africa and the Middle East. Before entering these markets, Malaysia, which Vuclip recently gained entry via a partnership with Telekom Malaysia Bhd (TM), becomes an important market to study consumer behaviour before expanding further, said Jakatdar. “Malaysia offers many great data points: Smartphone penetration [here] is 70%, fantastic

connectivity across mobile and fixed broadband, and 38% of consumers are accessing the Internet on mobile devices alone, which is the highest in the world. And video consumption on the Internet takes up about 50% of the traffic here,” he told The Edge Financial Daily in an interview. “If we can provide a great solution and a great service for consumers here, in a couple of months or years, it will work in other markets.” But Jakatdar declined to reveal how many subscribers Vuclip plans to attain because the developing markets’ Internet penetration rate is rapidly rising. Nor did he wish to divulge the company’s target for the average viewer engagement time. Still, if Vuclip sets Malaysia up as the benchmark, it should aim for at least five hours per week, which is the amount viewers spend on Astro Malaysia Holdings Bhd’s “Astro On The Go” mobile streaming service. And if it’s any indication, Digital News Asia reported that Malaysians spend an average of 80 minutes per session on YouTube, where 65% of the time is viewed on mobile devices, citing a study conducted by TNS Research and Google Malaysia. Viu runs on a “freemium” business model, which allows it to compete directly with illegal streaming websites that charge nothing. With

the free version, subscribers will have to sit through advertisements to access just half of Viu’s 10,000hour (and increasing) video library. The premium, ad-free version costs RM10 a month, where subscribers get to watch selected latest Korean shows as early as eight hours after they premiered on the republic’s TV stations. Jakatdar said there are subtitles in Bahasa Malaysia, simplified Chinese and English, available in both the free and paid versions. “The fact that consumers can engage with our content for free, albeit ad-supported, is a very big difference to Netflix and iflix, where the consumer has to make a decision of ‘whether I stay with this brand or I walk away’,” Jakatdar said. While other streaming services are jockeying for position as the leading OTT provider of Hollywood content, Viu, on the contrary, went the other way by offering a library centring on local and regional content — be it from South Korea, Taiwan, Hong Kong, India or Malaysia. Vuclip general manager for Malaysia Kingsley Warner said Korean content ranks highly among Asian audience seeking drama shows online. “If you look in terms of pure audiences out of Malaysia that are going to leading pirated sites, they

Jakatdar: Consumers can engage with our content for free — it’s a very big difference to Netflix and iflix. Photo by Sam Fong

range from 700,000 to 1.8 million visitors on a monthly basis,” he said. Jakatdar said Vuclip had “a group of PhD [graduates]” as part of its consumer insight team to decipher audiences’ tastes over the last eight years. “[They] are experts in data mining. Every day, they look at hundreds of terabytes of data of what consumption patterns are resonating and what are not, what consumers are watching, and what features they are using.” Founded in 2008 and backed by Silicon Valley venture capital investors, Vuclip initially had a namesake

mobile streaming service that offered short clips like movie trailers and sports match highlights. But when PCCW acquired a majority stake in Vuclip in 2015 (Jakatdar declined to reveal the actual shareholding), the telecommunications and media giant went on a buying spree of regional content broadcasting rights, with the aim of providing a regional OTT video service. Viu was launched last Monday in Malaysia, joining Hong Kong and Singapore as part of the first phase of launches since last December. At this juncture, anyone who creates a Viu account will get a 30-day free access to its premium version: That means no advertisement for now. Beginning March 15, all TM’s 2.34 million broadband subscribers (as of Dec 31, 2015) will get Viu’s premium service for three months, at no extra charge. Industry sources said TM’s deal with Vuclip is similar to the one with iflix, where TM pays for the subscription fee. As for getting advertisers for Viu, Warner said online advertising in Malaysia is still growing at a healthy rate, but apart from YouTube, there are not many video-streaming sites that advertisers can invest in. “Advertisers are crying out for this type of opportunities. We know that for a fact.”

8 P R O P E RT Y S NA P S H

T

M ON DAY FEB RUARY 29, 2 0 16 • TH EEDGE F I N AN C I AL DAI LY

FREE transaction data

latest classified listings news

trend analysis

analytics

and more

Source: TheEdgeProperty.com

Brickfields 1Q2015 average price down 6.9% y-o-y • This week, the spotlight falls on the secondary market of non-landed residences in Brickfields and the integrated transport hub of KL Sentral. • Based on TheEdgeProperty.com’s analysis of transactions, the average transacted price of non-landed homes here has remained around the same levels since 2013. The average price retreated 15% from a peak of RM733 per square foot (psf) in 3Q2014 to RM623 psf in 1Q2015. This represents a 6.9% y-o-y drop on the previous corresponding quarter. • Transaction activity has also been lackluster since 2014. Total transaction volume for the 12 months to 1Q2015 fell 30.1% y-o-y from 166 units to 116 units. • While price growth and transaction activity appear to have cooled, KL Sentral has successfully established itself as a viable alternative for headquarters of companies due to its central location, excellent connectivity, supporting hotel and retail services and quality office spaces. Companies based in KL Sentral include Allianz Malaysia, CIMB Investment Bank, Google Malaysia, UEM Group and Shell Malaysia. • The prestige of KL Sentral has spread outwards, kick-starting development of the surrounding neighbourhood. Future projects include a mixed-use development at the former police headquarters along Jalan Tun Sambanthan. The project by Seni Nadi Land Sdn Bhd is expected to have a gross development value of RM2 billion. Meanwhile, located along Jalan Ang Seng is The Establishment, a serviced residence and boutique hotel development by Keystone Land Developments Sdn Bhd.

Brickfields non-landed residential average price

Source: TheEdgeProperty.com

Brickfields non-landed residential transaction volume

The Analytics are based on the data available at the date of publication and may be subject to revision as and when more data becomes available.

Could renting by the hour help hotels?

MOST READ ON

TheEdgeProperty.com

BY DAVI D REI D

LONDON: The French used to call it “cinq-a-sept”: That time of the afternoon for men to meet their mistresses before returning to their wives. But in modern times, could it be a saviour for struggling hotel chains? French website Dayuse.com is one company helping traditional hoteliers sell rooms for just a few hours during the day. Buyers include travellers who want a second office, a place to stay between flights rather than use an airport lounge or somewhere to grab a quick rest. Currently on the website, a fivehour daytime slot at a Best Western hotel in Manhattan is available from US$105 (RM441). The site claims that’s a 70% saving on night-time use. Growth story Dayuse launched in Paris in November 2010, focusing only on the French market. It now operates in 14 countries across Europe and North America. After announcing €15 million (RM68.81 million) of funding in January, the platform said it intends to expand to Singapore, Hong Kong, Dubai, Australia and Argentina. According to one article published on the website, the UK business witnessed 150% growth over the past

Vancouver’s island hinterland attracts affordability refugees

A view showing the Marriot Courtyard hotel in Montpellier, France. Dayuse is one company helping traditional hoteliers sell rooms for just a few hours during the day. Photo by Reuters

two years, and expects a similar rise this year. The firm itself said it will double staff at its London and New York offices this year. Lorenzo Sciotti, Dayuse’s business development manager, said most daytime reservations are now used for business. “In London, we get more business clients. Perhaps people want to rest after travel or they want to conduct a quick meeting. “Near airports, we get a lot of clients who have missed flights and prefer a bed to an airport lounge,” he said. Sciotti said in other markets, such as Italy, leisure bookings are more common. But even here, Sciotti said the main reason is not for love, but rather for what the com-

The hotel industry has suffered as Internet disruptors such as Airbnb have grabbed market share. But a travel analyst at Euromonitor international Ltd, Dr Wouter Geets, said big brand hotels won’t fight back by adopting daytime bookings. “Hotels want to compete with Airbnb by being more flexible. What that means is late checkouts and early check-ins. “Renting rooms during the day would restrict that,” he said. He was also uncertain about corporate use claiming modern hotel rooms don’t lend themselves well to business meetings. And on the tricky issue of afternoon affairs, Geets suggested some stigma over renting by the hour does remain. “I can imagine why big hotels would not want to be associated with that.” — CNBC

pany calls a “daycation”. “Imagine you can book a five-star hotel for the price of a two-star and you can use all the facilities, such as a spa or swimming pool,” he said. Bookings on the site can be made in cash and reservations cancelled without cost. Sciotti said hoteliers were initially reluctant to risk their brand against accusations of seediness, but 320,000 rooms had been booked since its launch. He claims the business is now better understood and he expects more chains to come on board. “On the site, we have 2,000 hotels and we are aiming for 5,000 hotels globally by the end of the year,” he For more, visit www.cnbc.com said.

Make first impressions count

BRDB Developments launches Camelia 3-storey garden terraced house Green Target to launch RM350 mil residential project in Raub

M O N DAY F E B RUA RY 29 , 2016 • T HEED G E FINA NCIA L DA I LY

9

10 B R O K E R S’ C A L L

M ON DAY FEB RUARY 29, 2 0 16 • TH EEDGE F I N AN C I AL DAI LY

QL Resources’ valuation appears lofty QL Resources Bhd (Feb 26, RM4.49) Downgrade to underperform with a lower target price (TP) of RM4.16: QL Resources Bhd’s nine-month ended Dec 31, 2015 (9MFY16) net profit of RM153.9 million (+7%) was within expectations by accounting for 74% and 71% of our in-house forecast and consensus estimates respectively. There were no dividends, as expected. Year-on-year, 9MFY16 revenue rose marginally by 2% to RM2.1 billion, driven by robust growth in the marine product manufacturing (MPM) division (+16.1%), thanks to higher export sales on the back of a weaker ringgit. 9MFY16 profit before tax (PBT) grew 6.8% to RM200 million, again attributable to the solid performance in the MPM division, which benefited from soft commodity prices. As a result, net profit rose 7% to RM153.9 million. Quarter-on-quarter, for the third quarter ended Dec 31, 2015 (3QFY16), revenue increased by 6.9% to RM738 million owing to growth in the MPM division (13.2%) on seasonality, and a 7.1% growth in the integrated livestock farming division due to higher sales volumes of feedstock. 3QFY16 PBT rose 8.3% to RM76.5 million due to the higher revenue from MPM and higher crude palm oil prices, which drove the palm oil activity division’s PBT up by 25.7% to RM4.5 million. As a result, net profit grew 4.9% to RM57.9 million.

Aeon’s new stores contribute to higher FY15 revenue

QL Resources Bhd FYE MAR (RM MIL)

Turnover Ebit PBT Net profit Core NP Consensus (NP) EPS (sen) EPS growth (%) DPS (sen) BV/Share (sen) PER (x) PBV (x) Net gearing (x) Dividend yield (%)

2015A

2016E

2017E

2,707.8 252.4 246.0 195.9 187.5 15.0 17.3 4.2 1.14 29.9 3.9 0.4 0.9

2,970.6 302.3 267.5 207.4 207.4 215.6 16.6 10.6 5.0 1.26 27.1 3.6 0.4 1.1

3,193.9 334.2 291.2 225.7 225.7 239.2 18.1 8.9 5.4 1.39 24.9 3.2 0.4 1.2

Source: Kenanga Research

The MPM division continued to be the growth pillar with consistent and resilient performance driven by robust demand for fishmeal and the weakening of the ringgit. Meanwhile, the hot weather caused by El Nino also boosted fish catches in Malaysia. As such, we foresee the division to continue sustaining earnings growth of QL Resources. Earnings growth is expected to be healthy at 10.6% and 8.9% over the next two years, underpinned by the defensive nature of its staple food products, which are less vulnerable to weak consumer sentiment. We made no changes to our

Aeon Co (M) Bhd (Feb 26, RM2.60) Maintain neutral with a lower target price (TP) of RM2.56: Aeon Co (M) Bhd’s revenue for the fourth quarter ended Dec 31, 2015 (4QFY15) increased by 0.4% yearon-year (y-o-y) to RM971.7 million. The growth was mainly contributed by a better performance from the property segment, which increased by 5.7% y-o-y, attributable to contributions from its new shopping centres. However, the retailing segment fell by 0.4% y-o-y attributable to the weaker consumer sentiment post-implementation of the goods and services tax, and a weaker ringgit. Financial year ended Dec 31, 2015 (FY15) cumulative revenue growth increased by a larger percentage of 3.7% y-o-y. This increase was mainly attributable to contributions from new shopping centres opened in 2014. Aeon’s 4QFY15 earnings slumped by 49.3% y-o-y to RM74.5 million. This decline was mainly due to higher operating costs, higher interest expenses and initial costs associated with the newly opened stores. Operating and interest costs increased by 2% y-o-y and 147% y-o-y respectively.

earnings forecasts. Aeon Co (M) Bhd No changes to our TP of RM4.16, based on unchanged 23 times FY17 FYE DEC (RM MIL) 2013 estimate price-earnings ratio (PER), Revenue 3,514.4 which is close to +1.5 standard deOperating profit 326.1 viation over a five-year mean. Although we like the company Operating profit 9.3 for its proven earnings track record margin (%) Pre-tax profit 331.8 and resilient nature, we think that 231.0 the valuation (24.9 times FY17 es- Net profit timate PER, close to +2 standard Net profit margin (%) 6.6 deviation over a five-year mean) Basic EPS (sen) 16.5 appears lofty. Thus, we downgrade Basic EPS growth (%) 8.6 our rating to “underperform” from 14.0 PER (x) “market perform”. 22.0 Risks include lower-than-ex- Net DPS (sen) (%) 1.6 Net dividend yield pected egg prices and higher-than-expected production costs. Source: Company, forecasts by MIDFR — Kenanga Research, Feb 26

Aeon’s retailing segment fell by 0.4% y-o-y due to weaker consumer sentiment. Photo by Sam Fong

Going forward, the group does not expect a lush 2016 due to the weak current consumer behaviour and rising cost of living. However, we believe in Aeon’s established presence and competitive strength in appropriate pricing, merchandise assortment and marketing strategies. The group also expects to improve its operational efficiency to ensure sustainable growth. We are maintaining our “neutral” recommendation on Aeon with FY16 TP of RM2.56. Our valuation is derived from FY16 price-earnings ratio (PER) of 21 times and FY16 earnings per share of 12.2 sen. Our PER is based on Aeon’s average historical quarterly PER for the past four years. — MIDF Research, Feb 26

2014

2015

2016F

2017F

3,705.5 302.1

3,834.6 227.0

4,060.3 246.1

4,321.2 264.8

8.2 301.3 211.9 5.7 15.2 (7.9) 14.0 5.0 1.6

5.9 210.8 131.7 3.4 9.5 (37.3) 13.9 5.0 1.6

6.1 244.1 170.8 4.2 12.2 28.1 14.0 5.0 1.9

6.1 264.2 184.9 4.3 13.2 8.2 14.0 5.0 1.9

S P Setia surpasses RM4b sales target S P Setia Bhd (Feb 26, RM3) Maintain neutral with a lower target price (TP) of RM3.10: Sales of the Battersea project may remain slow, given the upcoming supply in the Nine Elms area and the stamp duty hike in the United Kingdom last year. While S P Setia Bhd’s debt exposure in foreign currency terms is minimal, its cash flow may be tight for this project due to the scale of the development. We maintain “neutral”, with a TP of RM3.10 (from RM3.50), as property markets in Malaysia and London continue to stay weak. Fourteen months ended Dec 31, 2015 (14MFY15) sales reached RM4.3 billion, beating management’s RM4 billion estimate. The improvement in sales in November and December was mainly driven by projects in the Klang Valley, such as Setia Alam, EcoHill and Eco Glades. Overseas sales made up 33% of the total. Sales of Battersea Power Station (BPS)

S P Setia Bhd FYE DEC (RM MIL)

Total turnover Reported net profit Recurring net profit Recurring net profit growth (%) Recurring EPS (RM) DPS (RM) Recurring PER (x) P/BV (x) Div yield (%) ROAE (%) ROAA (%) Net debt to equity (%) Our vs consensus EPS (adjusted) (%)

2014

2015

2016F

2017F

2018F

4,139 469 437

5,780 787 787

4,903 694 694

5,442 886 886

4,152 669 669

6.4 0.17 0.11 16.7 1.21 3.9 8.1 3.6 26.9

80.1 0.30 0.20 9.5 1.04 6.8 11.9 5.3 17.2

(11.8) 0.26 0.20 11.3 1.06 6.9 9.3 4.2 10.3

27.7 0.32 0.22 9.2 1.06 7.6 11.6 5.2 14.0

(24.5) 0.23 0.21 12.6 1.09 7.3 8.6 3.8 15.3

-

-

(6.6)

12.5

(17.9)

Source: Company data, RHB

Phase 3A remained subdued at 59% (from 57% in October). S P Setia has set a RM4 billion sales target, and will roll out two town-

ship projects in financial year 2016 (FY16), including Eco Templer and EcoHill 2. The medium-density Setia Sky Seputeh serviced apartments

S P Setia will roll out two township projects in FY16. Photo by Abdul Ghani Ismail

will also enter the market, for which we think sales may be slower due to higher pricing. We raise our FY16 and FY17 earnings forecasts by 14% to 15%, in view of several completed projects such as Setia Alam, EcoHill, Eco Park and Eco Glades (worth a combined RM1 billion), as well as the handover of the Eco City strata titles (RM306 million) and Eco Sanctuary Singapore (S$473 million or RM1.41 billion) in the second half ending Dec 31, 2016. Parque Melbourne (A$247 million or RM738.54

milion) and BPS Phase 1 (£846 million or RM4.92 billion) could also be completed by year end. Unbilled sales were at RM9.2 billion (versus RM9.5 billion in the fourth quarter of FY15 [4QFY15]). Key risks include delays in launches and worse-than-expected market conditions. We maintain our “neutral” rating, but cut our TP to RM3.10 from RM3.50, based on a larger 35% (from 20%) discount to our updated revalued net asset value estimate. This is to reflect potential risk of the Battersea project and the weak property market in Malaysia. S P Setia’s 5QFY15 results, which only covered two months — November and December 2015 — beat our and market expectations. Fullyear earnings were largely boosted by the completion of Fulton Lane in 3QFY15/4QFY15. Meanwhile, a single-tier final dividend per share of 19 sen was declared. — RHB Research, Feb 26

11

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M ON DAY FEB RUARY 29, 2 0 16 • TH EEDGE F I N AN C I AL DAI LY

IJM Plantations posts RM7.1m core profit IJM Plantations Bhd (Feb 26, RM3.73) Maintain hold with a higher target price (TP) of RM3.55: IJM Plantations booked a third quarter ended Dec 31, 2015 (3QFY16) headline profit of RM22.8 million. But after stripping out foreign exchange (forex) gains and deferred taxation of RM15.7 million, it notched a core profit of RM7.1 million (-83% year-on-year [y-o-y], -54% quarter-on-quarter [q-o-q]), missing expectations. Its nine-month FY16 (9MFY16) core earnings were RM47.1 million (-60%), as cumulative net forex impact and deferred taxes were a negative RM6.4 million. The company’s third-quarter FY16 (3QFY16) revenue rebounded 7% sequentially to RM155.7 million (-15% y-o-y), in tandem with the crude palm oil (CPO) average selling price of RM2,137 per tonne (+4.2% q-o-q, -1.7% y-o-y). CPO production of 58.700 tonnes was notably lower by 13% y-o-y and 5% q-o-q. The key drag was weaker external fresh fruit bunch (FFB), which fell 23% y-o-y. Blended oil extraction rate was also 1.3 percentage points (ppts) lower at 19.4% versus 20.6% in 3QFY15. IJM Plantations had observed crop reduction effects in this quarter, with internal FFB of 233.800 tonnes (-1.2% y-o-y, -0.6% q-o-q), due to persistently low rainfall. The

LBS Bina Group Bhd FYE DEC (RM MIL)

IJM Plantations Bhd FYE MAR (RM MIL)

3Q2015

2Q2016

3Q2016

% CHG Y-O-Y

% CHG Q-O-Q

Revenue Operating exp Other oper (Exp)/Inc Operating profit Net interest (Exp)/Inc Exceptional gain/(loss) Pre-tax profit Tax Minority interest Net profit Net profit bef except Ebitda Opg orofit margins (%) Net profit margins (%)

183 (135) 6.20 54.2 (2.1) (13.4) 38.7 (12.4) 0.79 27.1 40.6 54.2 29.5 14.8

145 (151) (2.5) (8.8) (3.2) (20.3) (32.3) 17.7 9.66 (4.9) 15.3 (8.8) (6.1) (3.4)

156 (115) 0.01 41.1 (3.2) 15.7 53.6 (24.3) (6.5) 22.8 7.08 41.1 26.4 14.6

(15.1) (15.4) (99.9) (24.2) (54.6) nm 38.4 96.6 (920.0) (16.1) (82.5) (24.2) -

7.3 (24.3) (100.2) nm 0.8 nm nm (237.6) (167.2) nm (53.8) nm -

Source: Company, AllianceDBS Research

plunging Malaysian production (-26% y-o-y) was cushioned by the 53% growth in Indonesia FFB production, thanks to the larger mature area there. Our CPO price forecasts are RM2,600/RM2,810 per tonne in calendar year 2016 and 2017 (CY16/17) forecast, implying an approximately 20% upside from the average 2015 price. Thus, IJM Plantations’ earnings in 4QFY16 and FY17/18 may see an uplift due to its upstream plantation focus. However, we note the existence of production risks in the wake of

the lack of rainfall seen last year, especially at its 23,000 Malaysian hectarage which had a 15% fall in 9MFY16 FFB production. We expect IJM Plantations’ Indonesian mature planted area to reach 27,500 hectares (ha) at end-FY16, from 21,000ha the year before. Thus, we forecast FFB production there to rise 36%, which is on track as 9MFY16 posted 35% growth. Our discounted cash flow-based TP of RM3.55 factors in CY16/17 CPO price forecasts of RM2,600/ RM2,810 per tonne. — AllianceDBS Research, Feb 26

Thong Guan sees positive prospects Thong Guan Industries Bhd (Feb 26, RM3.16) Upgrade to outperform with a higher target price (TP) of RM3.40: Thong Guan Industries Bhd’s financial year ended Dec 31, 2015 (FY15) core net profit (CNP) of RM34.5 million beat expectations, making up 120% of the consensus (RM28.7 million) and 133% of our forecast (RM25.9 million) on stronger-than-expected plasticsegment margins (FY15 actual: 6.1% versus FY14 actual: 4%) due to a stronger US dollar. A final dividend of nine sen was announced for cumulative FY15 actual dividend per share of 13 sen, well above our 7.4 sen forecast. This implies a payout ratio of 40% for a solid dividend yield of 4.4%. Year-on-year (y-o-y), FY15 CNP rose 58% as plastic-segment profit before tax (PBT) jumped 91% to RM40.4 million on stronger margins as discussed above. The food and beverage segment’s PBT also improved 24% to RM2.8 million on strong contributions from tea and curry powder products. Quarter-on-quarter, fourth quarter end-

ed Dec 31, 2015 (4QFY15) CNP increased 74% to RM14.9 million as plastic PBT rose 52% to RM18.4 million on better margins (10% versus 3QFY15’s 7.1%). We expect continued top- and bottom-line growth driven by capacity expansion into highermargin products such as the 33layer nanotechnology stretch film line, commissioned in 1QFY16, the five-layer blown film line, commissioning in 2QFY16, and new Pure wrap lines targeted in the second half of FY16, with an estimated capacity of 1,400 tonnes per line annually. We raise our FY16 estimate CNP by 12% to RM33 million reflecting our stronger margin outlook, and introduce our FY17 estimate CNP of RM36.7 million (+11% y-o-y). Rating upgrade to “outperform” (from “market perform”). We are positive on Thong Guan’s prospects as a strong US dollar and continued capacity expansion into high-margin production lines should sustain the plastic segment’s margins going forward. Upgrade our TP to RM3.40 (previously RM3.07) on an unchanged

We expect continued top- and bottom-line growth driven by capacity expansion into higher-margin products.

target price-earnings ratio (PER) of 11 times as we roll forward our valuation base year to FY17 estimate (from FY16 estimate) in line with the sector. Hence, forward earnings per share are higher at 30.9 sen (from 27.8 sen). Our target PER is based on a 30% discount to the consumer packaging PER which incorporates Thong Guan’s lower net margins (4.6%) versus consumer packager SLP Resources Bhd’s 15.3%. Risks to our call include volatile plastic resin prices, foreigncurrency risk, and lower-than-expected contributions from its China-based subsidiaries. — Kenanga Research, Feb 26

Revenue Operating profit Profit before tax Net profit Core net profit EPS (sen) DPS (sen) PER (x) P/BV (x) Revenue growth (%) Core net profit growth (%) Operating margin (%) PBT margin (%) Dividend yield (%) Net gearing (%) ROE (%) ROA (%)

2013

2014

2015

2016F

2017F

533.5 437.7 426.9 392.3 47.5 8.6 11.0 15.7 0.9 4.7 27.7 82.0 80.0 8.1 13.0 5.5 2.4

670.4 114.3 104.3 70.1 70.1 12.7 9.3 10.6 0.7 25.7 47.6 17.0 15.6 6.9 21.0 7.0 3.2

680.4 109.9 107.6 76.0 76.0 13.8 9.3 9.8 0.7 1.5 8.4 16.2 15.8 6.9 37.8 7.4 3.1

925.0 148.0 129.5 84.8 84.8 15.4 9.3 8.8 0.6 35.9 11.5 16.0 14.0 6.9 30.1 6.9 3.2

1015 162.4 142.1 93.2 93.2 16.9 9.3 8.0 0.5 9.7 10.0 16.0 14.0 6.9 23.6 6.4 3.1

Source: Company, JF Apex

LBS Bina FY16 underpinned by sizeable unbilled sales LBS Bina Group Bhd (Feb 26, RM1.35) Maintain buy with an unchanged target price of RM1.70: LBS Bina Group Bhd (LBS) recorded a fourth quarter ended Dec 31, 2015 (4QFY15) bottom line of RM23 million, up 16.8% quarter-on-quarter (q-o-q), but marginally down 2.1% year-on-year (y-o-y) on the back of a higher top line, +39.1% q-o-q and +11.2% y-o-y. For financial year ended Dec 31, 2015 (FY15), LBS chalked up a net profit of RM76 million (+8.4% y-o-y), which is in line with our full-year estimate of RM74.8 million. On a q-o-q basis, LBS posted a better net profit backed by higher progress billings as more houses were handed over to buyers and higher product margin. However, on a y-o-y basis, the group’s net earnings were slightly lower, affected by a higher effective tax rate despite achieving higher revenue and profit before tax. For FY15, LBS achieved better results attributable to higher revenue and lower financing cost incurred. LBS achieved stellar new sales of slightly more than RM1 billion in 2015, 60% higher than RM645 million recorded in 2014. The majority of sales, about 85% of sales value, was derived from Bandar Saujana Putra (BSP) and D’Island in the Klang Valley. Moving forward, the group is striving to achieve RM1.2 billion new sales in 2016 amid the challenging property outlook. In tandem with the rising new sales, the group’s unbilled sales also surged strongly to RM1.1 billion as of end-January 2016, which could sustain its future earnings to one and a half years, that is equivalent to 1.6 times 2015’s top line. For 2016, LBS plans to launch RM1.7 billion gross development value (GDV) of projects with 82% of sales value concentrated in the Klang Valley. List of launches are: i) BSP in Southern Klang Valley — serviced apartments with a total GDV of RM385 million; ii) D’Island Residence in Southern Puchong — two-storey semi-D, superlink and serviced apartments with a total GDV of RM498 million; iii) Desiran Bayu, Puchong — two-storey cluster link and semi-D (bumi

lots) with a GDV of RM157 million; iv) Telok Gong, Klang —industrial factories with a GDV of RM125 million; v) Bukit Jalil — serviced apartments (PPA1M) with a GDV of RM209 million; vi) Bandar Putera Indah, Batu Pahat — terraced homes and semi-D with a total GDV of RM86 million; vii) Golden Hills and Centrum, Cameron Highlands — terraced homes and shop lots with total GDV of RM93 million; and viii) Midhills, Gohtong Jaya, Pahang — serviced apartments with GDV of RM137 million. We learnt that the group is looking out to expand its land bank in the Klang Valley, aiming for sizeable acreage for future township development as its existing BSP township comes into maturity. To date, LBS has an undeveloped land bank of 2,658 acres (1,076ha), rendering a potential GDV of RM22 billion. No change to our earnings forecast for 2016: RM84.8 million (+11.5% y-o-y) and 2017: RM93.2 million (+10.0% y-o-y). These are premised on our respective new sales assumption of RM1 billion and RM1.2 billion for 2016 and 2017. Maintain “buy” on LBS with an unchanged TP of RM1.70. However, we have fine-tuned our revalued net asset valuation (RNAV) after updating the projects’ GDV, unbilled sales, net debt, China assets, and including newly issued Warrant B. Our TP is now based on 45% discount (previously 60% discount) to our revised fully-diluted RNAV/share of RM3.11 (previously RM4.24). Our fair value for LBS implies 14 times 2016 forecast fully-diluted earnings per share of 12 sen. We favour LBS for its: i) resilient sales and clear earnings visibility; ii) diversified product offerings and geographical exposures (mid- to high-end property across the Klang Valley, Pahang, Johor, Sabah); iii) attractive dividend yield of 6.9%; iv) sturdy balance sheet with current low net gearing of 0.2 times; and v) unlocking the potential land bank values in Zhuhai International Circuit (ZIC) following the signing of a memorandum of understanding be tween LBS and JiuZhou Group Holdings Ltd on the upgrading of ZIC. — JF Apex Securities, Feb 26

13

M O N DAY F E B RUA RY 29 , 2016 • T HEED G E FINA NCIA L DA I LY

SOUTHEAST ASIAN ART

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1pm, 20 March 2016 at Hilton Kuala Lumpur 1

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1. KEN YANG, The Malaysian Mona Lisa, 2013, Oil on linden wood panel, 91CM X 61CM. AUCTION ESTIMATE: RM150,000 - RM250,000 2. AHMAD ZAKII ANWAR, Buddha, 2003, Acrylic on jute, 92CM X 92CM. AUCTION ESTIMATE: RM44,000 - RM54,000 3. MIN WAE AUNG, Nuns Under the Rain, 2008, Acrylic on canvas, 94CM X 130CM. AUCTION ESTIMATE: RM30,000 - RM35,000 4. U LUN GWYE, Shoulder Dance,1994, Oil on canvas, 60CM X 76CM. AUCTION ESTIMATE: RM39,000 - RM48,000

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14 H O M E

M ON DAY FEB RUARY 29, 2 0 16 • TH EEDGE F I N AN C I AL DAI LY

Najib: Give Adenan a strong mandate Sarawak chief minister guarantees political stability SARATOK: Prime Minister Datuk Seri Najib Razak wants the people of Sarawak to give chief minister Tan Sri Adenan Satem a strong mandate in the coming 11th state election. He said, with the strong mandate, Adenan would be able to form a state government that guarantees political stability and able to negotiate with the federal government for any form of development the state needed. “The strong mandate is the voice of the people of Sarawak and we (the federal government) must respect the mandate given,” he said during the opening of the “Sejiwa Senada 2016 Saratok” programme, here yesterday. Also present were Adenan and his wife Puan Sri Jamilah Anu, as well as federal and state ministers. By giving victory to Barisan Nasional (BN) of the state, Najib said the people of Sarawak would be able to ensure that the state and federal governments were on the same team, with one voice in ensuring that rapid development would continue to be implemented in the state. Adenan, who was celebrating his second anniversary as the Sarawak chief minister yesterday, had carried out numerous changes during his tenure as the chief minister. “The two-year duration is not sufficient for him to implement everything for the people. Give him another five years to bring more development to Sarawak,”

High-level conspiracy to topple Najib, says Azalina KUALA LUMPUR: Umno supreme council member Datuk Seri Azalina Othman Said on Saturday said there was a high-level conspiracy to topple Prime Minister Datuk Seri Najib Razak in what would have been a coup against democratic process and the decision of the people in the last general election. Azalina, who is also a minister in the Prime Minister’s Department, said former deputy prime minister Tan Sri Muhyiddin had said he was briefed by the former attorney-general (AG) Tan Sri Abdul Gani Patail when both were in office yesterday, about alleged criminal “proof” against the Prime Minister. She said, a then sitting attorney-general privately briefing and sharing classified legal information with Muhyiddin, a member of cabinet and an Umno member who clearly have vested interests, was unethical. “The fact that a [then] sitting attorney-general was privately briefing and sharing classified legal information with [Tan Sri] Muhyiddin, a member of cabinet and Umno member who clearly had vested interests, is not only unethical but also a breach of the Official Secrets Act,” she said in a statement to the media yesterday. Azalina said Muhyiddin was

not only in breach of the Official Secrets Act, but was also complicit in a politically-motivated conspiracy to manipulate and abuse our legal system in order to overthrow a democratically elected prime minister. Based on his statement, Muhyiddin was also indirectly questioning the credibility of the current AG and the Malaysian Anti-Corruption Commission (MACC), she said. Azalina said AG Tan Sri Mohamed Apandi Ali on Jan 26, 2016 cleared the prime minister of any wrongdoing regarding the donations. “So if any quarters are not in agreement with the AG’s action in handling a prosecution, they do not have any basis to challenge it; it is important to note that the AG’s decision was made after a detailed investigation from all angles on the report submitted by the MACC,” she said. Azalina questioned why only now Muhyiddin was making such a confession, just after he was suspended as the deputy president. “Can his act be seen as abetting since he claims to have information on an alleged criminal act, but did not report to the authorities until today (yesterday),” she added. — Bernama

Hisham: I did not decide on Muhyiddin’s suspension Najib (left) and Adenan raising their joint hands in support of the ‘Sejiwa Senada 2016 Saratok’ programme in Saratok yesterday. Photo by Bernama

Najib said. He reminded the people that if they erred in making their choice in the next state election, whatever negotiations carried out between the state and federal governments on empowerment would face dif-

ficulty. “The negotiation will be simple if it is done between the federal government and a strong state government under the leadership of Adenan,” he added. — Bernama

Mandate is a new responsibility, not a gift, says Zahid LAWAS: Deputy Prime Minister Datuk Seri Dr Ahmad Zahid Hamidi regards the mandate given to him by the Umno supreme council last Friday, to execute the duties of Umno deputy president, as a responsibility. In thanking the Umno supreme council for its confidence in him, he said he considered the post not as a gift but a new responsibility. He said there should now be a new chapter in the country’s political development, to leave behind the ambiguities and confusion of the past. “In my opinion, these duties and responsibilities do not ig- DPM: There should now be a new nore any former figure or indi- chapter in the country’s political vidual seen to be antagonistic, development. Photo by Bernama as this was a unanimous decision made by members of the Umno bration in Taman Awam Lawas, supreme council,” he told a news here, yesterday. conference after launching the Last Friday, the Umno supreme National Anti-Drugs Day cele- council unanimously decided to

Zahid said he would also engage with former leaders in executing his duties.

suspend Tan Sri Muhyiddin Yassin as party deputy president with immediate effect and Ahmad Zahid to carry out the responsibilities of the deputy president. Ahmad Zahid subsequently urged all members of the Umno party that has been the backbone of Barisan Nasional (BN), as well as members of BN component parties to close ranks as they gear up to unite for BN’s survival. He said he would also engage with former leaders in executing his duties. — Bernama

KUALA SELANGOR : Umno vice-president Datuk Seri Hishammuddin Tun Hussein has refuted claims that Tan Sri Muhyiddin Yassin’s suspension from the deputy president’s post was decided by him. However, he said the decision was made unanimously by all the supreme council members based on the party’s principle. “During the Umno supreme council meeting yesterday (on Saturday), coincidentally the president and first vice-president had excused themselves (from the meeting) ... I was the most senior member to chair the meeting. “I want to verify here that the decision was made, after detailed discussions and unanimously, by all members of the Umno supreme council, including from Johor,” he said.

He was commenting on the statement by Pagoh Umno division deputy chief Ismail Mohamed who blasted him and several other leaders for supporting the decision to suspend Muhyiddin. “Yesterday’s decision cannot please everyone, apart from assisting the party, the deputy president’s duty and responsibility are to assist the president ... when he is unable to assist, we had to suspend and the decision was fair,” said Hishammuddin. At the Umno supreme council meeting on Saturday, Umno secretary-general Datuk Seri Tengku Adnan Tengku Mansor announced Muhyiddin’s suspension as deputy president with immediate effect and the duties will be performed by vice-president Datuk Seri Dr Ahmad Zahid Hamidi. — Bernama

Tabung Haji makes police report against Rafizi KUALA LUMPUR: Lembaga Tabung Haji yesterday lodged a police report against Pandan member of parliament Rafizi Ramli over his allegation that the agency (Tabung Haji) had given a corporate guarantee to its associate company, TH Heavy Engineering Bhd (THHE). In a statement here yesterday, Tabung Haji said Rafizi, who is also Parti Keadilan Rakyat (PKR) vice-president, was asked to name the bank which approved the loan to THHE, as claimed by him. “TH (Tabung Haji) regrets

the dissemination of documents through the social media and the baseless and slanderous accusation. “The allegation has a negative impact on TH and will hurt the interest of its depositors. TH will cooperate with the authorities in carrying out the investigation soonest possible,” said the statement. Tabung Haji said the police report was made to protect the interest of its depositors and its own reputation as an Islamic institution in Malaysia. — Bernama

15

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16 H O M E

M ON DAY FEB RUARY 29, 2 0 16 • TH EEDGE F I N AN C I AL DAI LY

Avoid negative culture Raja Muda of Perlis urges young generation to acquire valuable knowledge ARAU: Raja Muda of Perlis Tuanku Syed Faizuddin Putra Jamalullail said young Malaysians should endeavour to build up their character, and acquire valuable and religious knowledge to tackle the influence of negative culture. He said the youths in this country must also prepare to equip themselves with adequate knowledge, as a guide to differentiate between what is good and bad. “More people, particularly the youths, currently forget history, know the major threats to security and how we achieved peace and and sovereignty before the country harmony in our beloved country. gained independence. As such, I hope the youths would “In fact, we are still not free from

Tuanku Syed Faizuddin: More people, particularly the youths, currently forget (our) history.

various forms of threat, such as drug abuse, terrorist groups and deviationist teachings,” said Tuanku Syed Faizuddin. He added that the young generation today is exposed to new “enemies”, such as the freedom to access information through the Internet, which poses a threat to individuals, families, the community, religion and the country.

He said this after launching the Love the Nation Carnival and the Perlis Royal Cycling Program 2016 at the Grounds of the C-Mart Complex here yesterday. Also present were National Civics Bureau (BTN) director-general Datuk Ibrahim Saad, Perlis BTN director Jazli Fadzil and Mufti of Perlis Datuk Dr Mohd Asri Zainul Abidin. The programme organised by the Perlis BTN received the cooperation of the state government, with the support of the Perlis Youth Council, Kangar Municipal Council, and the Perlis Islamic Religious and Malay Customs Council. — Bernama

Over 1,000 dogs in action at Dogathon BY N ORA ZU RRA AZIZ & SI T I SH A FI A H ARIFF IN

SERDANG: Back with a bark. The biggest dog gathering in Malaysia returned to take a bite of the action, as over 1,000 canines wagged and pawed their way to the Bukit Expo in Universiti Putra Malaysia (UPM) here yesterday morning. Dogathon 2015/2016 is back for its 19th instalment as the biggest annual event organised by the Veternak and Zoologico Club of UPM’s faculty of veterinary medicine. The event is aimed at raising funds to aid the Stray Animal Awareness programme and assist the annual Pro-Kasih programme. According to the dean of the university’s faculty of veterinary medicine, Prof Dr Mohd Hair Bejo, the programme began way back in 1997, as a platform to address issues of stray dog awareness and promote how to handle stray dogs.

“Dogathon gives a great exposure to society about responsible pet ownership, pet health, stray animal welfare as well as the veterinary profession. “This programme can also create awareness among society of how stray animals can be a risk to people if they are not well taken care of. “Diseases from animals, such as rabies, can easily be transmitted to humans. So, if we don’t look carefully in terms of the welfare and health of stray animals, then this will pose a risk to people. This is called [a] zoonotic disease,” he told reporters at the programme. Commenting on the Pro-Kasih programme, Mohd Hair said it is a stray animal-neutering project aimed at controlling the population of strays in a humane manner. He said it is conducted by students of the faculty of veterinary medicine under close supervision of veterinarian lecturers. Meanwhile, rescue dog own-

Participants at the Dogathon 2015/2016. The event is aimed at raising funds to aid the Stray Animal Awareness programme and assist the annual Pro-Kasih programme.

er Chan Meng Fye, 69, said he attended the programme for the first time to get acquainted with other dog owners and know about other breeds of the canines. In 2014, the 18th Dogathon was

officially recorded as the biggest dog gathering in Malaysia, in the Malaysia Book of Records, when it gathered a total of 1,216 dogs in a single location for a day. — Bernama

CIDB’s construction competition enters final phase KUALA LUMPUR: Arena of Youth, a construction-related competition organised by the Construction Industry Development Board (CIDB), has entered its final phase. “The competition is aimed at training and nurturing a new generation of builders for the Malaysian construction industry,” CIDB general manager of corporate communications Noryani Ismail said yesterday. Winners will be adjudged during the International Construction Week 2016 here from April 11 to 15. More than a dozen universities, colleges and secondary schools in the country are taking part in Arena of Youth. The competition challenges two categories of students — secondary school and university students — to develop a city of the future and design solutions to mitigate the impact of

natural disasters respectively. In the My City 2050 segment, local schools under the Pintar Foundation and international schools, comprising more than 100 upper secondary school students, will compete to showcase models of a futuristic city in Malaysia in 2050, while the Rebuild It Green (RIG) competition encourages university teams to develop solutions to mitigate the impact of natural disasters on urban areas. “The competition was inspired by natural disasters in Malaysia, including the devastating floods in 2013 and 2014, as well as promoting the aspirations of the Construction Industry Transformation Programme (CITP),” said Noryani. The CITP, from 2016 to 2020, is the national agenda to transform the construction industry and was launched by Prime Minister Datuk

Seri Najib Razak last September. The CITP comprises four thrusts: Quality, safety and professionalism; environmental sustainability; productivity; and internationalisation. Noryani said each thrust would have a vital role in the Arena of Youth competition, but the productivity thrust had greater prominence since the Malaysian construction industry is currently facing several human resource challenges. “Through Arena of Youth, we intend to show students that construction is a viable career option and for the country to realise the aspirations of 2020,” she said, adding that the current reluctance among many Malaysians to take up construction jobs might be due to lack of awareness or misperceptions about the construction industry as being dirty, dangerous and difficult. Meanwhile, Dr Yeap Gik Hong,

head of the engineering department, School of Engineering of KDU University College Penang, described Arena of Youth, which was launched as part of the CIDB’s 20th anniversary last year, as a useful mechanism to broaden and deepen the minds of young people on the construction industry in a creative way because it challenges participants to think beyond the classroom. He said KDU had opted for a combination of degree and diploma level engineering and design students for the RIG competition to bring about fresh ideas and greater creativity. The winner of the RIG competition will be awarded a seed fund of RM40,000 to establish a junior enterprise, a non-profit company run by the winning team members to turn their ideas into reality. — Bernama

RSD hopes to cut fatal road accidents with Pan Borneo Highway SARIKEI: The Road Safety Department (RSD) hopes the building of the Pan Borneo Highway, which will be the main route linking Sarawak and Sabah, when completed will reduce accident fatalities. Its director-general, Abdul Ghafar Yusof, said the construction of the highway would improve the conditions of the undulating roads in Sarawak, as they are built on swampy and peat land. “Apart from the attitude of drivers, the condition of roads and vehicles also contribute to road accidents,” he told Bernama here on Saturday. Earlier, he gave away about 30 safety helmets to road users here, in conjunction with the Sarawak RSD road safety campaign. Also present were Sarawak RSD director Davina Agnes Enteli and Jalan Sarikei road transport department branch head Zokipli Kawi. The 1,663km Pan Borneo highway is expected to cost RM29 billion. Abdul Ghafar said if no actions are taken to improve road safety, accident fatalities could rise from more than 6,000 people in 2015 to 10,000 by 2020. He said the RSD is targeting to reduce fatal road accidents to 5,000 or lower via a 2014 to 2020 road safety plan. — Bernama

Husband arrested after woman found dead IPOH: A woman was found dead in the living room of her house in Ladang Sengat, Simpang Pulai here yesterday. S Durga Devi, 17, allegedly murdered by her husband, was found lying down with her face badly injured, apparently punched. Ipoh police chief ACP Sum Chang Keong said police were alerted to the incident at about 7.30am by a member of the public, who heard a brawl going on in the victim’s house. “The neighbour reported hearing loud arguments coming from the victim’s home from midnight to 5am. The fight was believed to be over domestic problems. The body has been sent to Raja Permaisuri Bainun Hospital for [a] post-mortem,” he said, adding that the victim’s 27-year-old labourer husband was arrested for investigation under Section 302 of the Penal Code and no weapons were seized. On the traces of blood found outside the house, Sum said blood samples would be sent to the forensic unit for identification. — Bernama

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M O N DAY F E B RUA RY 29 , 2016 • T HEED G E FINA NCIA L DA I LY

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M ON DAY FEB RUARY 29, 2 0 16 • TH EEDGE F I N AN C I AL DAI LY

G20 wants govts doing more, central banks less ‘Monetary policy alone cannot lead to balanced growth’ BY EN DA C U RRA N & JEF F BLACK

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inance chiefs from the world’s top economies committed their governments to doing more to boost global growth amid mounting concerns over the potency of monetary policy. In a pledge that will prove easier to write than deliver and may disappoint investors looking for a coordinated stimulus plan, the Group of 20 (G20) said “we will use fiscal policy flexibly to strengthen growth, job creation and confidence.” After a two-day meeting in Shanghai, finance ministers and central bank governors also doubled down on a line from their last gathering that “monetary policy alone cannot lead to balanced growth.” For those few analysts calling for a 1985 Plaza Accord-type agreement to address exchange-rate tensions, there was no such luck: International Monetary Fund managing director Christine Lagarde said there were no discussions about anything like that. The G20 members did reaffirm they will refrain from competitive devaluations, and — in new language — agreed to consult closely on currencies. While central banks proved critical in avoiding a global slide into de-

pression last decade, there is now no consensus among the world’s top economic guardians backing stepped-up monetary stimulus. That leaves focus on fiscal policies that are subject to domestic political constraints, and a structural-reform agenda the G20 said will be gauged through a new indicator system. Among those publicly indicating a potentially reduced role for central banks was Lagarde, who said last Friday the effects of monetary policies, even innovative ones, are diminishing. Bank of England governor Mark Carney used a Shanghai speech ahead of the G20 to voice scepticism about negative interest rates — now in place in continental Europe and Japan — and their ability to boost domestic demand. For his part, Chinese Premier Li Keqiang, speaking in a pre-recorded video at the G20, said quantitative easing policies cannot remove structural obstacles to growth and may lead to negative spillovers. The People’s Bank of China has been using more orthodox tools to support fiscal spending and structural reforms. Adding to an atmosphere of unease about further central bank actions, some officials expressed concern about Japan’s policies, after its surprise move to adopt negative in-

terest rates last month roiled the currency market. “The debate was also about Japan to be honest — there was some concern that we would get into a situation of competitive devaluations,” Eurogroup chief Jeroen Dijsselbloem, who heads gatherings of euro area finance ministers, told reporters on Saturday. “If policy decisions — for example for domestic issues — lead to devaluation, we should inform and consult with the different countries.” Japanese policymakers are now contending with a yen that rallied more than 6% in February, the biggest monthly surge since 2008 — and one that stoked speculation among traders that officials could intervene in the market by selling the currency. The G20 said in the Shanghai communique that “we will consult closely on exchange markets,” language that was not included in its September statement. Delivering on the G20 statement to ease pressure on central banks will require political appetite for unpopular domestic reforms, while new spending may be constrained by already overstretched budgets, especially across much of the advanced world. “Where is the boost to growth going to come from? Fiscal policy? Reform?” said Richard Jerram, the chief

economist at Bank of Singapore Ltd. “After six or seven years of trying to promote recovery there is no appetite for fiscal stimulus, and no easy or obvious reforms that have been neglected.” Some countries are heading in the other direction on the fiscal front. UK Chancellor of the Exchequer George Osborne warned just days ago he may make further cuts in public spending in his annual budget on March 16. See related story on Page 20 Japan is planning a 2017 sales-tax increase. German Finance Minister Wolfgang Schaeuble rejected fiscal stimulus last Friday. US budget policy has proved a constant battleground between Republicans and Democratic President Barack Obama. “There is no positive surprise” from the G20 commitments, said Mitsumaru Kumagai, chief economist at Daiwa Institute of Research in Tokyo. “There are no detailed plans in this agreement, so generally you can say they just achieved the bare minimum,” he said. “Stocks may sell off a bit.” Host nation China came through with the most specific plans, with Finance Minister Lou Jiwei pledging a wider fiscal deficit as his coun-

try’s leaders prepare for an annual gathering of the national legislature starting March 5. People’s Bank of China governor Zhou Xiaochuan also highlighted room for further monetary action. Other G20 members have not ruled out further central bank actions, and — for all his criticism of Japan — Dijsselbloem said last Friday that monetary policy can still do more. Officials at the European Central Bank (ECB) have signalled that, given the dimming of the global outlook and downward pressure on inflation coming from energy prices, a reduction in their deposit rate from the current minus 0.3% and even a boost to the pace of quantitative easing may be on the cards. Reflecting a consensus that central banks are already deploying their tools vigorously, the G20 said that “monetary policies will continue to support economic activity and ensure price stability, consistent with central banks’ mandates.” With the Federal Reserve already signalling it has pared back plans for rate hikes this year, there was less of a focus at the G20 gathering about US monetary policy. The upshot: central bankers leave Shanghai with little pressure to act at their respective March meetings.  Bloomberg

To Brexit or Bremain, that is the question — analysis BY WI L FRED FROST

THE debate in Britain over European Union (EU) membership centres on three main areas. First, the economy, and whether positives like free trade would exist outside of EU membership, and whether negatives like excess regulation would make a meaningful difference if removed. Second, migration of workers, and whether this helps offset Britain’s poor demographics, or acts as an excess strain on the welfare system. And third, sovereignty: Is Britain ruled by the members of parliament (MPs) in Westminster elected last May by British voters, or by unelected bureaucrats in Brussels? The big move in sterling over the past week came not at the start of last weekend when Prime Minister David Cameron returned from Brussels with his renegotiation deal, but rather on last Sunday and Monday. There are two main reasons for this. • First, Boris Johnson became the most high-profile member of Cameron’s own Conservative Party to say he would be backing an exit. The Financial Times reported this week that the number of Tory MPs backing Brexit is approaching 150, meaning that

the parliamentary party of 331 MPs is split almost in half. This, alongside some Labour MPs too, adds a broad, mainstream appeal to the exit camp that has found it hard to present a united front so far. • The other thing that occurred at the same time is that Johnson framed the debate very much as a sovereignty issue. Those who oppose the migration of Europeans from the continent into Britain are likely to vote for a Brexit regardless. Similarly, those who voted for Nigel Farage and the UK Independence Party in last year’s general election have probably already decided how they will vote on June 23. By pulling on the sovereignty chord, Johnson and company have a much better chance of convincing swing voters — the portion of which is large, adding unpredictability to this vote — to side with him and back an exit. Of the concessions that Cameron secured from Brussels in his renegotiation deal, politically the most significant was a permanent opt out from the “ever closer union” ambitions of the EU. This was meant to placate voters unsure over the sovereignty issue within the debate. However, Michael Gove — the justice secretary, and the second most high-profile Conservative Party member to back

an exit after Johnson — argued last week that it is not a significant legal concession. He also said it does not reduce the number of laws from the European Commission, or rulings from the European Court of Justice, that inhibit UK lawmakers from freedom to act as they see fit. Similar sentiment was echoed by Johnson. That said — Cameron’s deal with Brussels has further secured Britain’s special status in the EU. The two key areas being, on the economy, where Britain benefits from free trade yet maintains its own currency; and on migration, where Britain benefits from workers joining its economy from Europe, but is not compelled to let millions of refugees enter in the same way that Germany, France and many others are. These points are significant, and the prime minister and his team have

proven very adept at translating such factors into votes in the past. The threat to Britain’s economy will be at the forefront of the stay-in-theEU campaign. One point that while not top of the agenda for either camp in the UK, but hugely relevant for global markets, is what a Brexit would do to an already weak EU. The bearishness this week has focused on the pound, with the euro still mainly influenced by the European Central Bank rather than a UK referendum, but euro volatility can be expected as we approach June. The most crucial factor that is likely to decide this vote is uncertainty. The prime minister has a deal that shows what Britain’s relationship

with the EU should look like if the nation were to stay. Nobody has any idea what things would look like if Britain were to leave. The status quo is the easy choice for voters in June, and thus the onus is on the exit camp to make what will need to be a hugely convincing argument to voters to embrace the unknown. And in light of that, an ever-weaker pound may in fact play into Cameron’s hands — will people really vote for something that is so clearly hurting the Great British Pound? — CNBC Wilfred Frost is co-anchor of CNBC’s Worldwide Exchange.

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M ON DAY F E B RUA RY 29 , 2016 • T HEED G E FINA NCIA L DA I LY

WEEK IN FOCUS 1

(From left) Economic Planning Unit director-general Datuk Seri Dr Rahamat Bivi Yusoff, Minister in the Prime Minister’s Department Datuk Seri Abdul Wahid Omar, and United Nations Development Programme resident representative for Malaysia, Singapore and Brunei Michelle Gyles McDonnough in Putrajaya on Feb 23. — photo by Sam Fong

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(From second left in the back row) Accenture management consulting senior manager Goh Mei Lee, Hewlett Packard Enterprise director of human resource Natalia Navin, Zicolaw partner Yong Hon Cheong, CIMB Group chief people officer Hamidah Naziadin, Teach for Malaysia external relations director Prabha Devi Sundram, TalentCorp Malaysia chief executive officer Johan Mahmood Merican, Higher Education Ministry’s director of industry linkages division Dr Arham Abdullah, and PricewaterhouseCoopers Malaysia recruitment lead Michelle Hew together with winners Universiti Teknologi Petronas Team All-Stars team (first prize), Universiti Malaysia Perlis’ Smarties team (second prize), and Universiti Sains Malaysia’s Y team (third prize) at the CIMB Talent Trail 2016 grand finale in Kuala Lumpur on Feb 27.

REOPENING OF RWG’S SPICE GARDEN... (From left) India’s High Commissioner to Malaysia His Excellency T S Tirumurti, Spice Gardens owner Pradeep Batra, Genting Group chairman and chief executive Tan Sri Lim Kok Thay, Benefit Link Marketing Sdn Bhd owner and Pradeep’s son Bharat Batra, Spice Garden’s Focus 88 Sdn Bhd administrator Lalit Sharma, and Spice Garden branch manager Gagan Thapa during the ribbon-cutting ceremonyat the reopening of the new Spice Garden restaurant in Resorts World Genting (RWG), Genting Highlands, on Feb 25.

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(From left) Dean emeritus of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Sloan School of Management Richard Schmalensee, Bank Negara Governor Tan Sri Dr Zeti Akhtar Aziz, and Asia School of Business (ASB) president and dean Charles H Fine during the groundbreaking ceremony of ASB’s new campus in Kuala Lumpur on Feb 23.

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(From left) Deputy British High Commissioner to Malaysia Paul Rennie, British High Commissioner to Malaysia Vicki Treadell, CIMB Group chief people officer Hamidah Naziadin and chairman Datuk Seri Nazir Razak at the signing of a memorandum of understanding to mark the establishment of the Chevening-CIMB Asean scholarships in Putrajaya on Feb 23. — photo by Shahrin Yahya

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Philips Malaysia country manager Muhammad Ali Jaleel (left) and Nvizon Malaysia Sdn Bhd country head Adil Hafeez at the launch of Philips Malaysia’s first exclusive store outside the Klang Valley in Bayan Lepas, Penang on Feb 23.

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(From left) Hong Leong Islamic Bank Bhd chief executive officer (CEO) and managing director (MD) Raja Teh Maimunah Raja Abdul Aziz, Hong Leong Bank group MD and CEO Domenic Fuda, and CEO Foong Pik Yee at the release of Hong Leong Bank’s second quarter ended Dec 31, 2015 financial results in Kuala Lumpur on Feb 23. — photo by Sam Fong

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M ON DAY FEB RUARY 29, 2 0 16 • TH EEDGE F I N AN C I AL DAI LY

G20 nations pledge all tools to lift growth Despite German disquiet over fiscal and monetary stimulus BY B I L L SAVA DOV E & BENJAMIN CARLSON

SHANGHAI: The world’s 20 top economies will use all policy tools available to lift sluggish global growth, they said on Saturday, despite German disquiet over fiscal and monetary stimulus. The global recovery was continuing but “remains uneven and falls short of our ambition for strong, sustainable and balanced growth”, the G20 finance ministers and central bank chiefs said in a communique in Shanghai. They met amid fears driven by slowing growth in host nation China, steep falls in world financial markets, and US interest rates having risen for the first time in nine years — while Japan has adopted negative rates. The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development last week cut its 2016 global growth forecast from 3.3% to 3.0%. The G20 communique cited a list of specific risks the world faces, including volatile capital flows, falling com-

‘VW ex-CEO told of defeat device admission weeks before news was public’ FRANKFURT: Volkswagen’s (VW) former chief executive Martin Winterkorn (pic) was informed that the carmaker had told regulators it was using defeat devices two weeks before the scandal became public, the German tabloid Bild am Sonntag reported yesterday. It said it was in possession of a letter sent by an unnamed manager directly to then-CEO Winterkorn on Sept 4 that said: “In the conversation on 03.09.2015 with the regulator CARB (California Air Resources Board), the defeat device was admitted.” Volkswagen’s US CEO Michael Horn told a US House of Representatives hearing in October the company had told regulators on Sept 3 it was using defeat devices. A letter pointing to the thenCEO could lend weight to the cases of shareholders planning to sue Volkswagen for compensation for the plunge in its share price, saying VW should have told the public as soon as it became aware. — Reuters

modity prices and rising geopolitical tensions, along with “the shock of a potential UK exit from the European Union and a large and increasing number of refugees in some regions”. But disagreements about the right remedy overshadowed the meeting, after Germany’s Finance Minister Wolfgang Schaeuble said attempts to boost economies with monetary loosening could be counterproductive and fiscal stimulus — governments spending more or cutting taxes — had run its course. Germany sometimes has different economic priorities to other countries and Schaeuble was at odds with the United States, Britain and China, which all backed the use of monetary and fiscal tools to fight a downturn, as well as structural reforms. In the event the communique said the group “will use all policy tools — monetary, fiscal and structural — individually and collectively” to build confidence and strengthen the recovery. But it acknowledged that in-

China’s central bank governor Zhou Xiaochuan (left) and Schaeuble seen at the G20 finance ministers and central bank governors meeting in Shanghai, China on Saturday. Schaeuble said attempts to boost economies with monetary loosening could be counterproductive and fiscal stimulus — governments spending more or cutting taxes — had run its course. Photo by Reuters

creasing the money supply alone would not lead to balanced growth and said fiscal policy would be used “flexibly”, while giving a nod to the importance of structural reforms. In the communique the group reaffirmed their previous commitment to “refrain from competitive devaluations” and pledged to “con-

sult closely” regarding foreign exchange markets. IMF managing director Christine Lagarde said that Premier Li Keqiang and all Chinese representatives said “loud and clear” that “there was no intention, no determination, no decision whatsoever to devalue the currency”. — AFP

Berkshire Hathaway 4Q profit jumps almost one-third Quarterly operating profit rose 18% to US$4.67 billion, or US$2,843 NEW YORK: Warren Buffett’s Berk- per share, from US$3.96 billion, or shire Hathaway Inc on Saturday said US$2,412 per share. fourth-quarter (4Q) profit rose 32%, helped by improved results in its in- See related story on Page 24 surance operations and higher gains from investments and derivatives. Analysts on average had forecast Net income rose to US$5.48 billion operating profit of US$2,814 per share, (RM23.02 billion), or US$3,333 per according to Thomson Reuters. RevClass A share, from US$4.16 billion, enue rose 7% to US$51.82 billion. or US$2,529 per share, a year earlier. Book value per share, which reBY JONATH AN S TE M P E L

flects assets minus liabilities and which Buffett considers a good yardstick for Berkshire’s intrinsic worth, rose 3% from the end of September, to US$155,501. For all of 2015, profit rose 21% to US$24.08 billion, or US$14,656 per share. The gain from the merger that created Kraft Heinz Co prevented profit from edging lower, Berkshire said. Operating profit rose 5% to US$17.36 billion, or US$10,564 per share. — Reuters

Sharp deal with Foxconn is a messy milestone BY QUENTIN WE BB

HONG KONG: Sharp falling into Taiwanese hands would be a messy milestone. The future of the ailing display-maker was shaping up to be an acid test of Japanese reform. Now a putative deal with Taiwan’s Foxconn has descended into farce. Last Thursday, Sharp unveiled a long-awaited plan to sell control to various arms of the contract electronics giant for about ¥489 billion (RM18 billion). But hours later the Taiwanese side said, extraordinarily, it was poring over last-minute “material information” couriered over by Sharp and could not sign anything yet. It was not meant to be like this. When Foxconn recently overtook state-backed rival Innovation Net-

work Corp of Japan (INCJ)as the leading bidder, that seemed like a promising sign of change in corporate Japan. Victory would mean the board picking the most compelling pitch, not the establishment favourite — even if the bidder was a foreigner. In truth, the picture is more nuanced, since Foxconn’s bid is far more respectful of the status quo than INCJ’s break-up proposal, and softer on creditors, too. Failure at this stage would embarrass all concerned. But nor does the communications breakdown bode well for any combined future. The two companies have already differed publicly about whether Foxconn was the preferred bidder or not. Sharp now looks either desperate in leaving it so late to share

important data points, or confused in failing to understand Foxconn. Analysts who were already withering about the deal’s rationale will take even more convincing. Foxconn boss Terry Gou now has to decide whether to seal his unlikely victory in the light of new information. If he does, further challenges await. He will have to create a lot of value despite limited direct overlap between the two businesses. Judging by operating profit at rivals, Sharp is probably worth just ¥700 billion or so on an enterprise value basis, Bernstein analysts reckon — less than the value of its net debt and preferred shares. Taking over Sharp was already bold. The last-minute surprise makes it even more so. — Reuters

IN BRIEF IMF says Tunisia should adjust its ‘development model’ TUNIS: Tunisia should adjust its development model to counter economic slowdown and build “inclusive growth”, the International Monetary Fund’s (IMF) country representative said, ahead of an expected line of IMF credit. The authorities have failed to redress the economy since the uprising five years ago that ousted long-time president Zine El Abidine Ben Ali. Tunisia’s economic growth slowed to 0.8% last year from 2.3% in 2014, and unemployment nationwide stands at 15%. In January, a wave of protests spread to several cities including Tunis in some of the worst social unrest since the 2011 revolt. — AFP

‘Air France said to tell staff of 1,605 job cuts this year’ TOULOUSE: Air France told a workers’ council it will eliminate 1,605 jobs this year, with all cuts to come through voluntary departures, people familiar with the situation said. Ground staff, including mechanics and airport workers, account for the vast majority of the cuts, with 1,405 jobs set to go, or 3% of their total, the people said. Flight attendants will see their number reduced by 200 from 13,720 currently. Formal discussions with pilots start March 10, though the company aims to change work practices to boost productivity rather than reduce headcount. In total Air France has about 64,000 employees. — Bloomberg

HSBC says US ends antitrust probe into bank’s metals trading PARIS/WASHINGTON: HSBC Holdings plc said the US Justice Department shut an antitrust probe into precious metals trading as prosecutors focus on a criminal fraud investigation. The bank was informed in January that the antitrust division was closing its investigation, while the probe run by the fraud section is ongoing, the company disclosed in a filing last Thursday. HSBC was among at least 10 banks that were under investigation by the Justice Department over alleged manipulation of precious-metals prices, Bloomberg reported last year. — Bloomberg

DC rejects Exelon’s Pepco takeover plan SAN FRANCISCO: Exelon Corp’s plan to buy Pepco Holdings Inc for US$6.8 billion (RM28.56 billion) was rejected by Washington regulators who proposed new terms that would allow the deal to go forward if the companies and other parties agree in 14 days, according to a report by The Business Times. The District of Columbia’s Public Service Commission voted to reject an earlier merger settlement and to offer new conditions, the commission said last Friday in a statement. If those terms are accepted, the takeover is approved with no further action.

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M ON DAY F E B RUA RY 29 , 2016 • T HEED G E FINA NCIA L DA I LY

Rouhani allies win all 30 seats in Tehran — state TV TEHRAN: Iranian President Hassan Rouhani’s allies have won all of the capital’s 30 seats in parliament, with 90% of votes counted from last week’s election, state television reported yesterday. The pro-Rouhani List of Hope, led by reformist Mohammad Reza Aref, a former vice-president, knocked the No 1 conservative

Ireland faces uncertainty after ousting coalition BY NAOMI O’ L EA RY

DUBLIN: Ireland waited for the final results yesterday of an election that has left the eurozone country in limbo, ejecting Prime Minister Enda Kenny’s governing coalition but offering no clear alternative. First results from last Friday’s vote indicated Kenny’s Fine Gael party and its junior partner, Labour, will no longer have a parliamentary majority — but neither will any other grouping, meaning weeks of negotiations may lie ahead. “Democracy can be very exciting but it’s merciless when it kicks in. So this is a disappointment for the Fine Gael party,” Kenny told RTE television after he was re-elected in his rural constituency of Mayo. “Clearly the government of Fine Gael and Labour is not going to be returned to office and obviously one has to wait now until all the counts are in right across the country to see what the options that must be considered are.” In a trend that echoed elections in Greece, Spain and Portugal, voters turned to independent politicians, smaller parties and anti-austerity groups amid anger over hardship that has continued despite strong economic growth. Initial results indicated Fine Gael would still be the largest party in parliament, but old rival Fianna Fail is now hot on its heels in a remarkable recovery from 2011, when it was routed in the wake of the economic crash. The two parties have political similarities but a bitter history, as the political descendents of opposite sides in a civil war who have taken turns ruling Ireland since 1932. Yet between them they would have enough seats to govern, and party figures began to indicate this previously unthinkable arrangement could be considered. “We’re committed to doing our best by the country and ensuring that the country gets a good government. But it will take time,” said Fianna Fail leader Micheal Martin. — AFP

candidate, Gholam-Ali Hadad Adel, into 31st place, sealing a whitewash, according to the preliminary results. The tally showed Hadad Adel more than 6,000 votes behind the candidate in 30th place with the remaining 10% of ballots to be counted. The results were based on

around 2.6 million votes from a total of 2,900,000 in the capital, a key battleground. Should the results be confirmed, it would also mean that all eight women on the List of Hope would be elected. A total of 290 seats were up for grabs in last Friday’s election. In the 260 seats in the provinces,

the president’s allies fared less well. Out of the 56 constituencies outside the capital, 19 went to the main list of conservatives, nine to the pro-Rouhani list and 14 to independent candidates. Of the independents, six had ties to conservatives, fi ve to reformists and three were undeclared. — AFP

Clinton sweeps South Carolina primary Seizing momentum ahead of ‘Super Tuesday’ showdown BY IVAN COURO NNE

COLUMBIA: Hillary Clinton scored a resounding victory against Bernie Sanders in Saturday’s Democratic primary in South Carolina, seizing momentum ahead of the most important day of the nomination race: tomorrow’s “Super Tuesday” showdown. Four weeks into the White House primaries, the former secretary of state earned her first decisive win of the campaign, after a nail-biter victory in Iowa, a thumping loss to Sanders in New Hampshire, and then a five-point win in Nevada. South Carolina was the first southern state to vote for a 2016 Democratic nominee, before the race broadens to 11 contests across the country. “Tomorrow (yesterday) this campaign goes national,” Clinton said to a loud roar as she thanked supporters in Columbia, South Carolina, where she emerged with a clearer path to the nomination. “We are going to compete for every vote in every state. We are not taking anything, and we are not taking anyone, for granted.” US networks called the race for Clinton immediately after polls closed in the Palmetto State, where the majority of Democratic voters

Clinton waving at the end of her speech to supporters about the results of the South Carolina primary at a primary night party in Columbia on Saturday. Photo by Reuters

are African American, a voting bloc that she and her husband, former president Bill Clinton, have successfully courted for decades. Clinton also looked beyond her battle with Sanders, tweaking the man many now see as the likely Republican nominee: Donald Trump, whose campaign slogan is “Make America Great Again”. “Despite what you hear, we don’t need to make America great again. America has never stopped being great,” she said, reading

off a teleprompter. “But we do need to make America whole again,” she added, laying out an argument against the divisive rhetoric favoured by Trump, who has antagonised immigrants, Muslims and campaign rivals. “I know it sometimes seems a little odd for someone running for president these days and in this time to say we need more love and kindness in America,” she added. “But I am telling you from the bottom of my heart, we do.” — AFP

Hong Kong pro-independence activist stands in key vote HONG KONG: A Hong Kong activist, who seeks independence from China and has been charged over recent street battles with police, stood for office yesterday in a key by-election that highlights the city’s political fault lines. Edward Leung, 24, one of the leaders of “localist” group Hong Kong Indigenous, is vying to become a legislator after a prominent pro-democracy politician stepped down. Student Leung is taking on six other contenders for the New Territories East seat, including candidates

from pro-Beijing and pro-democracy camps. He is not tipped to win but his candidacy will be a barometer of how much support the fledgling localist movement — fiercely opposed by Beijing — can garner at the ballot box. Since massive rallies in 2014 calling for fully free leadership elections failed to win concessions from Beijing, young protesters like Leung have become increasingly disillusioned with the more established pro-democracy parties. Smaller groups have emerged

under a “localist” banner, pushing for greater autonomy and even independence from China as fears of interference from Beijing grow. Their frustrations spilt over into violence earlier this month when running battles with police left more than 100 injured. Leung is facing a rioting charge for his involvement. “Hongkongers are the masters of their own soil,” said Leung yesterday. “I will defend Hong Kong people’s interests and Hong Kong people’s rights.” — AFP

IN BRIEF Myanmar anti-drug group abandons poppy field mission after clashes WAINGMAW (Myanmar): A group of Christian hard-line anti-drug vigilantes yesterday abandoned plans to destroy poppy fields in an area of northern Myanmar after clashes broke out between their members and armed attackers in the past week. Pat Jasan, which is known for flogging drug users, said it was calling off the mission in mountainous Kachin state because local police and military said they could not provide protection. Myanmar is the world’s second-largest opium producer after Afghanistan, despite the government’s repeated vows to eliminate the drug trade. — AFP

British PM challenges Brexit supporters to admit risks LONDON: British Prime Minister David Cameron yesterday challenged supporters of a British exit from the European Union to admit the risks involved, as the battle for votes stepped up ahead of the June referendum. In an article for The Sunday Telegraph, a newspaper close to his Conservative party, Cameron warned that gaps in the case for a Brexit made it the “gamble of the century”. “When the people campaigning for ‘out’ are asked to set out a vision outside the European Union, they become extremely vague,” the prime minister wrote. — AFP

Three stabbed, 13 arrested at KKK rally in California LOS ANGELES: Three people were stabbed, one of them critically, and 13 others were arrested in California on Saturday when a Ku Klux Klan (KKK) rally erupted into clashes with counter-protesters, witnesses and police said. Around midday, half a dozen members of the white hate group, whose ranks still number several thousands in the United States, arrived at the protest site in Anaheim, officials said. At that point, the Klan members were “swarmed” by protesters, who attacked them with at least one wooden plank, witness Brian Levin told AFP. — AFP

Thousands stuck on Greek border as Balkans cap migrant arrivals ATHENS: Some 6,500 people were stuck at the Idomeni camp on Greece’s northern border with Macedonia on Saturday after four Balkan countries announced a daily cap on migrant arrivals. The build-up began in earnest last week after Macedonia started refusing entry for Afghans and imposed stricter document controls on Syrians and Iraqis, slowing the passage of migrants and refugees to a trickle. Tensions had run high along the border on Saturday, with some 400 migrants staging a protest demanding entry to Macedonia. — AFP

22

live it!

M ON DAY FEB RUARY 29, 2 0 16 • TH EEDGE F I N AN C I AL DAI LY

MO

WELLBEING . THE ARTS . WINE+DINE . STYLE+DESIGN . LEISURE

L Filepic of Richard Marx. He is scheduled to perform on March 9 at the Plenary Hall, KLCC.

KING OF BALLADS American singer and songwriter Richard Marx makes KL pit stop on his Asia tour

MA in V We dev to Am on par Asi oth

Lam do tha com du pu abs is s

exp his an ‘fle as w

BY HANNAH M ER ICAN

F

ans of American singer Richard Marx have something to look forward to this March, as he is scheduled to perform in Kuala Lumpur as part of his Asia 2016 tour. An adult contemporary and pop/rock singer famous for a string of ballads that got people singing and dancing in the 80s and 90s, the 52-year-old Marx staged his last solo concert in Malaysia in 2011, and is back this year with two more albums under his belt. The talented Chicago native has had a nearly three-decade-long career as a performer, songwriter and producer with plenty of highlights. Since his debut, he has sold more than 30 million albums worldwide, starting with hits such as Hold On to the Nights and Don’t Mean Nothing, which earned him a Grammy nomination for best male rock vocal performance in 1988. His next album, Repeat Offender, went on to be even more successful with singles Satisfied and Right Here Waiting, which both topped the charts. The following release also went platinum with hits such as Hazard and Keep Coming Back. The single Now and Forever, which was released from the album Paid Vacation, is one of Marx’s most popular tracks that is still regularly played at weddings and engagement parties. To date, Marx is the only male artist in history to have his first seven

singles reach the Top 5 on the Billboard charts. Aside from his own hits, Marx has also worked with countless talented musicians in the industry. In 1997, he recorded the hit song At the Beginning with Donna Lewis for the animated film Anastasia, which was released as a single from the film’s soundtrack. He has also served as a co-writer for artistes such as Sarah Brightman, Luther Vandross, 98 Degrees, N Sync, Barbra Streisand and Natalie Cole. In fact, Marx won a Grammy for song of the year in 2004, for the song Dance with My Father, which he wrote and composed in collaboration with Luther Vandross. This piece is particularly memorable as it was Vandross’s last studio album release before his untimely death in 2005. Marx’s last release was his eighth studio album, Beautiful Goodbye which was released in July 2014, with the new single Whatever We Started. The style of this album is a slight departure from his previous works with a deliberately sexy sound. Commenting on the album he says, “The songs on this record were influenced greatly by everyone from Sade to Bebel Gilberto to various EDM

(Electronic Dance Music) artists to even Chopin. I’m known for romantic music in the past, but this music I wrote is all more sensual and ethereal, and the lyrics are more adventurous than I’ve been willing to go in the past.” All but one of the songs on Beautiful Goodbye were written and produced by Marx himself. His latest album gave him the opportunity to collaborate with Walter Afanasieff, Vertical Horizon frontman Matt Scannell, David Hodges and television host Daisy Fuentes, who he married last year. With the release of his latest album, and of course news of this epic tour, there are no signs of Marx slowing down and this tour is an indication of more good things to come. Catch Richard Marx in concert on March 9 at 8.30pm, at the Plenary Hall, Kuala Lumpur Convention Centre (KLCC). Tickets are priced at RM528, RM428, RM328, RM228 and RM128, visit www.ticketpro.com.my to purchase. For regular updates on the concert, follow www.facebook.com/FatBoysMY.

P A C

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live it! 23

M O N DAY F E BRUA RY 29 , 2016 • T HEED G E FINA NCIA L DA ILY

WELLBEING . THE ARTS . WINE+DINE . STYLE+DESIGN . LEISURE

ART

BY M AE CHAN

Lam’s Patchwork for not seeing face to face.

Local artist Ivan Lam to show at Volta NY MALAYSIAN artist Ivan Lam will be participating in Volta NY 2016 from March 2 to 6, represented by Wei-Ling Gallery. First begun as a satellite fair that developed in Basel in 2005 “by galleries, for galleries” to showcase new and emerging art, Volta NY is the American incarnation of the original show focusing on solo artist projects. The established artist is the only Southeast Asian participant, with Malaysia being one of only three Asian countries present in the invitational fair, the other two being Japan and Taiwan. With an artistic career that has spanned 22-years, Lam’s practice has long evolved from his early years doing silkscreen prints, and portraits and paintings that veered between realistic and abstract. The one common in his practice has been the presence of duality, his works often characterising the push and pull between two ideologies — such as presence and absence, love and hate, past and present, and what is said and what is meant. For Volta NY, the artist presents a body of work exploring the generational gap between himself and his daughters, artistically conveying the persistent and ironic void that exists between generations of ‘flesh and blood’, be it with himself and his parents, as well as them with theirs before.

In a painstaking process, Lam also tried to close the space between his daughters, the duality of their beings and existence despite being conceived from the same parents. He ‘merged’ the faces of his daughters by first slicing the image of each into one inch stripes, then interspersing them with one another’s in over 60 stripes. Painting each face with a variation of black and white tones to differentiate and yet link them, the significance of the work is also found in the strong emotional connection he initially had, that became somewhat detached as he lost himself in the process of making the work. Lam credits his gallerist, Wei-Ling for bolstering his chance with the strong proposal they presented. Having also studied painting at the Maine College in the United States, Lam reflects on his journey: “It has taken me eighteen long years to return to New York City, and to return with a solo show, shows how far I have come and for that I am grateful. I hope to make the country proud”.

PICK OF THE DAY BASK in the hydrating benefits of the Ceramide Youth Restoring Essence, a balanced cocktail of 73 minerals for the skin. It nourishes the skin while providing antiageing benefits by helping to replenish the appearance of the skin’s natural barrier, promising smoother, firmer and healthier-looking skin. The essence also contains a hyaluronic acid derivative, pro-vitamin B5 and aloe vera complex that calms the skin and preserves moisture. Ceramide Youth Restoring Essence is priced at RM265 and available at Parkson in Pavilion, KLCC, Sunway Pyramid, Bandar Utama, IOI Putrajaya, Gurney Plaza Penang, Plaza Merdeka Kuching, One Borneo Kota Kinabalu, Ipoh, Aeon in Mid Valley, Kinta City Ipoh, KL Sogo and Robinson The Gardens Mid Valley.

Volta NY will be held at Pier 90, New York from March 2 to 6. For more information, visit www.ny. voltashow.com.

Personal ASSISTANT CO MPI L ED BY SHALINI YEAP

WORK. LIFE. BALANCE TUCK into delicious Italian fare at Troika’s Sky Dining restaurant, Strato. Try out this month’s lunch menu at RM50++ for the twocourse option or RM65++ for three courses. But if it’s your birthday, Strato would like to commemorate your once-in-every-four-year celebration with a complimentary two-course set lunch or pasta-of-the-day dinner. Present your identification card at Strato, Level 23A, Tower B, The Troika 19 Persiaran KLCC, Kuala Lumpur for a birthday meal, on the house. Visit www.troikaskydining.com/strato or call (03) 2162 0886 for reservations and more information.

BENCHMARK is a group exhibition taking place at Artcube, featuring the works of five Malaysian contemporary artists – Hamir Soib, Masnoor Ramli Mahmud, Zulkifli Yusoff, Abdullah Jones and Abdullah Hamdan. The artworks include the strip collage technique as well as photo print on aluminium style. View the la Lumpur between 11am and 8pm today. Call exhibition at 3-10 and 3-13, Level 3, Intermark (03) 2181 1787 or visit www.artcube.com.my/ Mall, The Intermark, 348 Jalan Tun Razak, Kua- contact-arctube for more information.

SPEND your Monday evening jamming to the beats of WVC. The band is made up of bandleader/composer/arranger/music director/pianist Tay Cher Siang, bassist AJ and drummer KJ Wong. There is no cover charge for tonight’s show, but patrons are required to buy a minimum of two drinks to enjoy the show. No Black Tie is located at 17, Jalan Mesui, Off Jalan Nagasari, Kuala Lumpur. Call (03) 2142 3737 or visit www. facebook.com/noblacktie for more information.

24 F E AT U R E

M ON DAY FEB RUARY 29, 2 0 16 • TH EEDGE F I N AN C I AL DAI LY

There may never be another Buffett Because most CEOs aren’t even trying to emulate him BY TA RA L AC H A PELLE

NEW YORK: Warren Buffett’s eating habits are entirely unhealthy. His jokes and analogies induce groans — and he sprinkled plenty of them into the annual letter he released to Berkshire Hathaway shareholders on Saturday morning. When it comes to running a business, though, the folksy, 85-year-old billionaire has proven to be the best there is. And so, they say there may never be another Warren Buffett. There won’t because most chief executive officers (CEOs) aren’t even trying to emulate him, which is probably why so much of their dealmaking has been ineffectual by comparison. Berkshire Hathaway’s success, put simply, is the result of Buffett not putting all the company’s eggs in one basket. That’s how Berkshire — a declining textile business when Buffett took over in 1965 — got to prosper into the fifth-largest corporation in the world, with a market value of US$325 billion (RM1.36 trillion) and record profit of about US$24 billion in 2015. The rest of the corporate world has turned its nose up at conglomerate structures and decided that what investors need is less complexity. This viewpoint posits that more focused management teams are less distracted and allocate resources more efficiently, making for a more appealing investment for shareholders. For some companies that did become too sprawling (perhaps General Electric [GE] is the best example), that may be true. Never has the pressure been so intense on a company to pick one industry or end market and stick with it. In the face of growth challenges,

CEOs have thrown their hands up. They’re combating demographic shifts, penetrated markets and letdown in China, and they don’t have time for costly innovation that can be hit or miss. Investors want to see earnings growth now. That’s why most companies are embracing deals — but specifically buying only those assets that fit their main line of business and selling off those that don’t. It’s very different from Buffett’s method. Of the 20 most valuable companies in the world, the only true remaining diverse conglomerates may be Berkshire, Johnson & Johnson and GE. At what point will the break-up trend come up short and diversification once again become the name of the game? There are two other big differences between Buffett’s acquisition strategy and everyone else’s. First, his sensitivity to price. He won’t overpay, whereas many others have shown they will. The median earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation, and amortisation multiple for global merger and acquisition (M&A) exercises last year was the highest since the record in 2007. On a revenue basis, last year was the record. Second, Buffett buys businesses run by managers he admires and he keeps them in those roles, or takes stakes in other big public companies such as Coca-Cola, IBM and Wells Fargo. The acquired companies become part of the Berkshire umbrella and funnel the cash up the chain so that Buffett can invest it. This is also a stark contrast to the strategy at Jorge Paulo Lemann’s 3G Capital, which had made Buffett’s recent partnering with the private-equity firm a head-scratcher. Buffett addressed it in his annual letter, boil-

ing it down to two different ways to reach the same goal. 3G buys a business and removes the bloat, while Buffett scopes out targets that aren’t bloated. Together, they teamed up to cut the fat at ketchup maker Heinz, which has since merged with macaroni-and-cheese maker Kraft. However different their M&A styles are, Buffett says he isn’t opposed to working with Lemann again, probably more as an investor. Diversifying means there are more risks and pitfalls to manage, and Buffett has pointed out a few. Declining coal shipments will hurt his railroad, BNSF Railway, for one — and driverless cars might pose a threat to his auto insurer, Geico. On the other hand, the potential impact of climate change on his other insurance businesses isn’t keeping him up at night. He did, however, mention an unsettling threat that should keep all of us up, but over which we have no control: the probability of a catastrophic event such as a cyber, biological, nuclear or chemical attack. It’s the type of risk that’s low now, but “approaches certainty in the longer run”, he wrote. Yikes! Corporate America may be up against more challenges than ever as gross domestic product trucks along at 2% and some smart people start to question the stability of our economic recovery. But Buffett is still the nation’s cheerleader, and that’s a good sign. In a way that only he could put it: “America’s golden goose of commerce and innovation will continue to lay more and larger eggs.” But, ya know, just as long as that goose isn’t cooked by nuclear warfare. — Bloomberg

More subprime borrowers are falling behind on their auto loans BY MAT T S C UL LY

NEW YORK: More borrowers with spotty credit are failing to make monthly car payments on time, a troubling sign for investors who have snapped up billions of dollars of securities backed by risky auto debt. Delinquencies on subprime auto loans packaged into bonds rose in January to 4.7%, a level not seen since 2010, according to data from Wells Fargo & Co. Rising delinquencies come as a warning sign that more loans may end up in default down the road, said John McElravey, an analyst at the bank. What may be most troubling, however, is that the default rate is already climbing, up to 12.3% in January from 11.3% the prior month. That is the highest rate since 2010, the data show. Securities backed by auto loans are structured to absorb a portion of anticipated defaults, but concerns have mounted over the last year that cumulative losses on auto loan securitisations may end up exceeding initial estimates,

4.98

Rising delinquencies come as a warning sign that more borrowing may end up in default down the road.

thanks to declining underwriting standards. Loan performance may be worsening because of a number of factors, including a rise in initial jobless claims, said McElravey. He identified an auto finance company in Texas, for example, that began experiencing a noticeable increase in net losses six months ago. The increase coincided with a rise in unemployment in Texas, where the oil industry has been hit hard by prolonged low prices, he said. The data are worth watching closely, he added, “especially against the backdrop of subpar economic growth”. — Bloomberg

128.98

Markets 2 5

M ON DAY F E B RUA RY 29 , 2016 • T HEED G E FINA NCIA L DA I LY

BURSA MAL AYSIA MAIN MARKET

Bursa Malaysia

YEAR HIGH

Sectorial Movement INDICES

CLOSE

+/-

%CHG

INDICES

CLOSE

5.28

0.32

TECHNOLOGY

3,249.47

21.76

0.67

FTSE BURSA 100

11,245.43

9.93

0.09

589.78

0.17

0.03

FTSE BURSA MID 70

12,776.12

-82.06

-0.64

INDUSTRIAL PRODUCT

145.21

-1.36

-0.93

FTSE BURSA SMALL CAP

15,173.25

-64.18

-0.42

CONSTRUCTION

269.93

-1.31

-0.48

FTSE BURSA FLEDGLING

15,796.40

-135.46

-0.85

TRADE & SERVICES

223.72

-0.28

-0.13

FTSE BURSA EMAS

11,540.64

6.55

0.06

14,028.51

66.47

0.48

FTSE BUR M’SIA ACE

5,690.60

-28.23

-0.49

FTSE BUR EMAS SHARIAH

12,310.18

-25.83

-0.21

FTSE BUR HIJRAH SHARIAH

13,752.38

-35.90

-0.26

8,408.81

128.66

1.55

1,663.44

KLSE INDUSTRIAL

KLSE FINANCIAL KLSE PROPERTY

1,127.27

6.04

0.54

KLSE PLANTATION

7,837.09

-12.94

-0.16

490.39

4.05

0.83

KLSE MINING

FTSE/ASEAN 40

0.05

%CHG

CONSUMER PRODUCT

KLSE COMPOSITE

22.93

+/-

0.22

Bursa Malaysia Main Market YEAR HIGH

YEAR LOW

DAY HIGH

CONSUMER PRODUCTS 0.745 0.550 0.665 4.334 3.400 3.540 9.400 5.327 9.400 0.510 0.220 — 6.150 4.004 6.010 2.600 1.200 1.220 5.380 3.022 4.950 68.080 53.080 56.960 0.110 0.045 0.045 1.125 0.650 0.665 1.870 0.880 1.730 0.660 0.427 0.540 0.445 0.230 — 13.732 11.300 12.180 1.310 0.720 1.230 2.925 2.580 2.620 1.970 0.399 1.620 3.290 1.120 2.780 0.100 0.035 — 2.450 1.193 2.350 1.360 1.055 1.320 0.175 0.065 0.110 0.075 0.040 0.055 0.983 0.800 0.830 52.100 40.852 50.900 0.165 0.065 0.115 0.220 0.105 0.170 0.280 0.165 0.195 0.460 0.190 0.325 2.620 1.693 2.500 0.325 0.240 0.250 0.990 0.640 0.760 20.040 16.745 20.000 0.940 0.475 0.795 1.407 0.990 0.990 1.220 0.350 0.950 1.040 0.595 0.920 14.448 12.152 13.900 1.640 0.720 1.230 2.580 2.070 2.270 1.130 0.930 — 0.175 0.040 0.050 6.290 4.084 6.290 1.196 0.920 1.010 0.552 0.391 0.450 5.280 2.850 4.750 1.438 0.832 1.290 0.490 0.340 0.425 3.102 1.816 1.980 1.420 0.623 1.080 1.170 0.425 0.750 4.740 2.568 4.180 4.000 1.521 3.680 0.400 0.055 0.060 0.935 0.465 0.810 2.632 1.742 2.220 1.200 0.920 1.060 0.150 0.055 — 8.100 5.412 6.250 9.490 2.950 9.050 0.245 0.130 0.190 0.405 0.185 0.280 2.997 2.130 2.630 0.925 0.700 0.805 2.388 1.450 1.550 4.640 1.808 4.330 0.250 0.050 0.055 1.554 1.160 1.250 1.120 0.810 0.955 1.417 1.080 1.250 5.226 4.507 4.710 0.145 0.045 0.060 1.650 1.100 1.460 75.500 68.737 75.000 2.800 2.186 2.750 0.245 0.080 0.130 0.395 0.220 0.365 1.010 0.620 0.965 0.580 0.455 0.500 2.530 1.990 2.040 7.797 6.425 6.850 2.230 1.232 2.150 25.700 19.454 25.200 0.785 0.604 — 0.370 0.200 — 0.885 0.275 0.650 1.280 0.755 1.000 0.325 0.175 0.275 0.584 0.402 0.550 2.099 1.450 1.720 16.700 13.802 16.120 0.630 0.470 — 2.728 1.563 2.160 1.525 0.968 1.300 2.957 1.394 2.400 4.650 3.514 4.520 1.710 1.340 1.510 2.778 1.488 2.570 0.585 0.400 0.470 0.880 0.435 0.870 0.735 0.380 0.635 2.450 0.766 2.120 3.167 1.580 1.820 0.065 0.040 0.040 2.450 1.671 2.450 1.520 0.730 1.270 0.745 0.365 0.590 0.510 0.280 — 3.299 2.262 2.400 1.300 0.355 1.160 2.178 1.040 1.260 1.610 1.184 1.360 0.575 0.445 — 0.470 0.170 0.410 10.996 6.500 7.060 2.430 1.471 2.240 0.850 0.430 0.720 0.098 0.045 0.055 0.670 0.300 — 0.690 0.405 0.450 2.350 1.430 2.150 0.525 0.190 0.505 1.147 0.797 0.945 3.490 1.419 2.650 2.084 1.354 1.450 INDUSTRIAL PRODUCTS 1.236 0.883 1.060 0.210 0.105 0.110 0.640 0.475 0.495 0.450 0.250 — 1.070 0.830 0.925 2.454 1.850 — 0.200 0.105 0.110 * Volume Weighted Average Price

DAY LOW 0.650 3.480 9.000 — 5.850 1.200 4.900 55.880 0.045 0.655 1.670 0.530 — 12.100 1.150 2.580 1.590 2.740 — 2.260 1.300 0.105 0.050 0.800 50.020 0.110 0.160 0.190 0.305 2.500 0.240 0.760 19.800 0.765 0.990 0.905 0.905 13.820 1.140 2.200 — 0.050 6.230 0.990 0.440 4.600 1.270 0.410 1.940 1.030 0.715 4.030 3.640 0.055 0.790 2.100 1.040 — 6.180 8.680 0.175 0.275 2.530 0.795 1.540 4.200 0.050 1.200 0.930 1.250 4.560 0.055 1.460 74.240 2.750 0.125 0.345 0.940 0.500 1.990 6.800 2.080 24.900 — — 0.620 0.950 0.265 0.540 1.650 15.760 — 2.100 1.290 2.370 4.480 1.470 2.570 0.465 0.830 0.635 2.040 1.790 0.040 2.380 1.270 0.570 — 2.370 1.120 1.240 1.360 — 0.385 6.920 2.200 0.685 0.050 — 0.430 2.100 0.500 0.920 2.600 1.410 1.030 0.105 0.490 — 0.920 — 0.105

CODE

7120 7090 2658 7051 6432 7722 7129 4162 7243 9288 7174 7154 7128 2836 7035 7148 9423 2828 5188 7205 7202 5214 7179 7119 3026 7198 7182 5091 9091 7149 7208 7094 3689 9776 2755 8605 9172 3255 5102 5606 5606PA 5187 3301 5160 7213 7141 5024 8478 5107 7152 8931 5247 7216 8303 6203 7062 0002 5172 7006 9385 7943 8079 7089 7126 7085 7087 5189 3662 7935 5886 5202 5150 3921 4707 7060 7139 7215 5066 7071 7107 4006 7052 3719 5022 9407 6068 5231 4081 5080 7088 4065 7190 8966 7134 7237 7084 9946 5252 5157 7180 7165 7412 7246 8532 7103 7186 7082 7211 4405 7200 7252 9369 7230 7176 4588 7757 7203 5156 7121 5155 5584 7184 5159 7178 5131 0012 7086 7061 7131 7191 9148 7146

COUNTER

ACOSTEC AHEALTH AJI AMTEK APOLLO ASIABRN ASIAFLE BAT BIOOSMO BONIA CAB CAELY CAMRES CARLSBG CCK CCMDBIO CHEEWAH CIHLDG CNOUHUA COCOLND CSCENIC CSL DBE DEGEM DLADY DPS EKA EKOWOOD EMICO ENGKAH EURO EUROSP F&N FARMBES FCW FFHB FPI GAB GCB GOLDIS GOLDIS-PA HBGLOB HLIND HOMERIZ HOVID HUATLAI HUPSENG HWATAI IQGROUP JAYCORP JERASIA KAREX KAWAN KFM KHEESAN KHIND KOTRA KSTAR LATITUD LAYHONG LCHEONG LEESK LIIHEN LONBISC LTKM MAGNI MAXWELL MFLOUR MILUX MINTYE MSM MSPORTS MWE NESTLE NHFATT NICE NIHSIN NTPM OCR OFI ORIENT PADINI PANAMY PAOS PARAGON PCCS PELIKAN PMCORP POHKONG POHUAT PPB PPG PRLEXUS PWF PWROOT QL REX SASBADI SAUDEE SERNKOU SGB SHH SIGN SINOTOP SPRITZER SWSCAP SYF TAFI TCHONG TEKSENG TEOSENG TGL TOMEI TPC UMW UPA WANGZNG XDL XIANLNG XINQUAN YEELEE YEN YOCB YSPSAH ZHULIAN 3A ABLEGRP ABRIC ACME ADVENTA ADVPKG AEM

CLOSING (RM)

+/– (RM)

VOL (‘000)

0.650 3.540 9.170 0.250 5.850 1.200 4.950 56.640 0.045 0.655 1.700 0.540 0.275 12.120 1.190 2.580 1.590 2.740 0.040 2.270 1.300 0.105 0.050 0.830 50.020 0.110 0.170 0.190 0.310 2.500 0.240 0.760 19.980 0.770 0.990 0.910 0.910 13.840 1.220 2.270 0.990 0.050 6.230 1.000 0.445 4.610 1.280 0.425 1.950 1.030 0.725 4.060 3.670 0.055 0.810 2.100 1.060 0.065 6.190 9.050 0.175 0.280 2.560 0.795 1.540 4.230 0.055 1.220 0.955 1.250 4.710 0.055 1.460 74.240 2.750 0.130 0.355 0.965 0.500 2.000 6.850 2.150 25.200 0.620 0.265 0.650 0.990 0.270 0.540 1.650 16.060 0.510 2.120 1.300 2.370 4.490 1.510 2.570 0.470 0.840 0.635 2.080 1.810 0.040 2.440 1.270 0.575 0.350 2.390 1.140 1.240 1.360 0.505 0.390 6.980 2.230 0.685 0.050 0.440 0.435 2.140 0.505 0.930 2.610 1.450

-0.015 0.130 0.170 — -0.110 -0.120 -0.050 -0.240 -0.005 -0.010 -0.050 UNCH — -0.060 -0.020 -0.040 -0.040 -0.010 — -0.070 UNCH -0.005 UNCH -0.020 -0.100 UNCH 0.010 -0.010 -0.015 -0.070 -0.005 UNCH 0.120 0.005 UNCH -0.015 -0.010 0.020 -0.010 UNCH — UNCH 0.020 UNCH -0.005 -0.170 0.010 0.005 -0.060 -0.050 -0.010 -0.080 0.020 -0.005 0.010 -0.160 0.010 — -0.040 UNCH UNCH 0.010 -0.050 -0.010 -0.010 -0.070 0.005 -0.020 0.005 0.020 0.010 UNCH -0.020 -0.320 -0.010 0.005 -0.005 0.025 UNCH -0.030 UNCH 0.070 0.200 — — 0.020 -0.010 0.005 -0.005 -0.010 0.240 — -0.050 UNCH -0.020 -0.010 0.010 UNCH -0.005 UNCH -0.010 0.080 -0.010 UNCH 0.060 -0.030 -0.010 — UNCH -0.020 -0.020 -0.140 — -0.005 0.030 0.010 -0.010 UNCH — UNCH 0.040 0.010 -0.010 -0.050 -0.030

1.040 0.110 0.490 0.305 0.925 2.300 0.110

0.010 0.005 UNCH — 0.010 — UNCH

PE# (X)

DY (%)

MKT CAP (MIL)

155 79.8 78.5 — 27.4 10.2 4.5 144.4 217.3 443.7 1116.7 20.1 — 134.8 139.2 71 77 49.7 — 67.2 198.4 237 3450.4 3.1 3 2572.5 5343.5 121 1720.7 8 362.2 9 33.5 255.1 3.5 271 713.1 232 606.1 224.3 — 262.8 60.4 248.7 1625 9.7 598.1 215 197.9 146 70 883.8 71.1 40 51.4 29.5 1.4 — 127.8 373.3 95.3 449.2 676.2 63.2 44.2 73.3 293 419.7 37 10 14.7 1825.1 46 2.6 22.1 3120.1 7255 1294.7 38.3 392.1 120.4 2198.8 14.7 — — 38.5 242.3 1437.9 815.2 463 672.1 — 212.2 48 138.2 196.9 2.3 11.4 719.4 504 92.5 298.9 95.8 350 449.9 11 1295 — 14.1 530.9 408.4 18 — 1352.7 486.1 13.1 140.1 4890.4 — 132.8 232.3 1151.1 124.5 78 102

0.662 20.90 3.490 13.84 9.246 15.25 — — 5.934 13.15 1.206 — 4.939 14.37 56.315 17.77 0.045 — 0.659 12.82 1.692 15.61 0.535 9.08 — 7.95 12.134 18.13 1.175 17.68 2.607 13.86 1.601 11.12 2.746 17.33 — — 2.313 16.24 1.313 15.97 0.106 2.20 0.050 — 0.829 8.49 50.675 21.38 0.110 45.83 0.168 — 0.192 — 0.310 4.69 2.500 38.52 0.242 41.38 0.760 — 19.941 20.21 0.770 — 0.990 79.20 0.910 16.19 0.913 24.59 13.841 17.61 1.196 47.10 2.201 10.13 — — 0.050 — 6.253 9.21 0.992 10.65 0.446 16.60 4.656 6.84 1.280 18.71 0.422 — 1.951 8.56 1.056 11.46 0.729 5.80 4.126 37.87 3.653 22.77 0.058 — 0.803 14.78 2.144 10.66 1.046 18.83 — — 6.192 6.74 9.034 21.08 0.180 — 0.278 10.53 2.575 9.88 0.796 9.56 1.544 8.76 4.260 9.65 0.055 — 1.225 19.87 0.934 — 1.250 13.57 4.633 11.46 0.060 — 1.460 — 74.815 29.54 2.750 12.76 0.128 — 0.356 30.60 0.955 19.03 0.500 — 2.003 15.48 6.849 13.80 2.116 12.90 25.008 12.52 — 23.05 — — 0.625 — 0.977 — 0.269 21.95 0.542 18.88 1.692 8.99 16.046 19.20 — 20.24 2.142 9.80 1.294 10.20 2.388 12.26 4.492 28.29 1.489 82.51 2.570 20.78 0.469 — 0.859 32.18 0.635 — 2.090 10.75 1.800 6.80 0.040 33.33 2.419 12.57 1.270 264.58 0.580 12.55 — — 2.388 19.90 1.136 13.54 1.252 7.20 1.360 46.10 — — 0.394 10.48 6.978 25.12 2.230 9.51 0.687 7.89 0.055 12.82 — 20.47 0.433 0.98 2.125 16.74 0.500 — 0.934 7.43 2.627 11.76 1.422 12.58

— 3.11 2.18 — 4.27 0.42 3.03 5.51 — 2.87 — 1.85 — 5.86 1.68 3.68 1.26 — — 2.34 6.15 — — 1.81 2.00 — — — — 2.60 — — 2.88 — 1.52 — 3.30 5.13 — 0.88 4.04 — 4.82 4.00 2.25 — 2.73 — 4.10 3.88 — 0.62 0.54 — — 3.33 — — 1.94 — — — 3.39 — 3.25 1.65 — 3.28 — 2.40 5.52 — 0.91 3.23 3.64 — 1.41 0.76 — 2.50 1.75 4.65 1.98 4.03 — — — — 1.85 2.12 1.49 2.45 1.98 2.31 3.38 0.95 — 1.95 — — — 4.81 5.52 — 2.05 — — — 2.09 0.44 2.02 5.51 1.98 — 5.87 3.59 3.65 — — 4.60 1.40 — 4.30 2.49 4.14

115.6 414.7 557.5 12.5 468.0 94.9 947.0 16,172.4 22.4 528.1 260.3 43.2 53.4 3,733.9 187.6 719.7 66.9 443.9 26.7 519.4 156.6 130.5 38.7 111.2 3,201.3 64.7 53.0 31.9 29.7 176.9 58.3 33.8 7,328.2 47.0 247.5 75.3 225.1 4,181.0 585.8 1,385.8 451.2 23.4 2,042.8 300.0 359.4 399.5 1,024.0 31.8 171.7 141.4 59.5 2,713.1 806.6 3.8 78.2 84.1 140.4 17.3 601.7 522.6 11.6 47.0 460.8 148.3 200.4 688.4 22.0 671.3 52.0 76.0 3,311.0 32.7 338.1 17,409.3 206.7 39.4 84.0 1,083.9 104.8 480.0 4,249.7 1,414.5 1,530.8 74.9 18.6 39.0 547.8 208.8 221.6 374.2 19,039.1 51.0 250.4 101.1 720.5 5,603.7 93.1 359.0 42.3 100.8 66.4 104.0 217.2 79.0 360.8 185.3 351.9 28.0 1,606.1 311.2 372.0 55.4 70.0 91.2 8,154.7 177.5 109.6 134.8 32.0 147.1 397.1 63.1 148.8 351.4 667.0

305.2 170.2 127 — 61 — 111.5

1.050 18.84 0.105 — 0.490 — — 10.63 0.921 45.79 — 15.50 0.105 220.00

1.35 — — — — 5.22 —

409.3 29.0 68.9 66.6 141.3 47.2 26.1

# PE is calculated based on latest 12 months reported Earnings Per Share

VWAP* (RM)

YEAR LOW

DAY HIGH

DAY LOW

0.480 0.325 0.410 0.375 0.400 0.260 — — 4.790 2.200 3.650 3.600 0.505 0.230 — — 0.800 0.610 0.720 0.715 0.535 0.335 0.375 0.365 1.129 0.620 0.640 0.620 0.260 0.120 0.235 0.210 1.560 0.952 1.200 1.090 5.073 3.730 3.820 3.820 0.730 0.382 0.645 0.630 0.880 0.560 0.650 0.650 0.215 0.100 — — 0.810 0.500 0.540 0.540 1.240 0.480 1.240 1.130 2.480 1.600 1.790 1.650 0.795 0.285 0.700 0.665 0.150 0.090 0.110 0.110 1.571 0.980 1.020 1.010 3.100 2.150 2.610 2.610 2.020 0.791 1.760 1.750 0.670 0.300 0.340 0.325 0.295 0.175 0.225 0.210 0.455 0.145 0.250 0.240 5.170 2.000 4.250 4.140 0.286 0.065 0.070 0.065 2.159 1.576 2.140 2.110 1.109 0.846 0.970 0.930 1.690 1.030 1.430 1.400 2.560 1.380 — — 1.500 1.140 — — 2.340 1.264 1.910 1.780 1.688 1.340 — — 1.230 0.710 — — 0.105 0.050 0.055 0.050 5.977 4.079 5.010 4.980 0.600 0.160 — — 3.155 1.440 1.710 1.640 0.895 0.200 0.675 0.640 1.000 0.670 0.885 0.880 1.350 0.880 1.270 1.240 1.008 0.534 0.865 0.865 0.440 0.275 0.385 0.385 2.420 1.636 2.230 2.190 0.475 0.220 0.375 0.365 0.308 0.170 0.185 0.180 0.635 0.250 0.450 0.380 0.510 0.312 — — 0.920 0.660 0.730 0.715 1.549 1.100 1.180 1.160 1.981 0.980 1.000 0.980 0.675 0.250 0.555 0.530 1.260 0.406 0.930 0.890 1.610 1.000 1.160 1.120 0.335 0.190 — — 0.823 0.596 — — 1.700 0.624 1.170 1.120 1.560 0.467 1.140 1.090 1.273 0.918 1.060 1.040 3.210 2.274 2.920 2.810 0.835 0.347 0.550 0.530 2.686 1.977 2.200 2.190 3.090 1.165 2.600 2.510 1.645 1.370 — — 2.970 0.455 2.240 1.850 0.080 0.040 0.055 0.050 0.420 0.205 0.260 0.240 0.135 0.080 0.090 0.090 0.630 0.285 0.410 0.405 0.312 0.173 0.220 0.215 0.135 0.070 0.110 0.105 1.121 0.883 0.930 0.900 0.750 0.320 0.595 0.570 6.150 4.600 4.850 4.600 3.500 2.880 — — 1.790 1.110 1.460 1.360 0.985 0.706 0.890 0.875 0.620 0.200 0.215 0.210 0.925 0.130 0.185 0.175 1.800 0.827 — — 1.040 0.530 0.760 0.715 0.430 0.310 — — 0.140 0.045 0.050 0.050 4.030 2.880 3.000 2.990 0.157 0.058 0.080 0.075 0.960 0.760 0.845 0.845 2.050 1.214 1.950 1.920 0.445 0.235 0.245 0.235 0.120 0.045 0.105 0.095 0.190 0.135 0.145 0.145 0.330 0.075 — — 1.280 0.920 — — 2.830 1.210 2.110 2.030 1.954 1.051 1.510 1.420 0.245 0.145 0.190 0.180 1.290 0.353 1.030 0.970 0.985 0.430 0.735 0.670 3.440 2.730 3.160 3.120 2.600 1.237 2.120 2.040 0.205 0.070 0.085 0.080 2.110 1.280 1.710 1.660 0.768 0.390 0.470 0.455 2.703 0.937 1.630 1.570 0.775 0.335 0.580 0.550 9.500 5.204 6.610 6.340 0.600 0.350 0.565 0.515 5.886 4.286 5.460 5.400 0.558 0.330 0.370 0.370 0.620 0.410 — — 10.517 8.231 9.190 9.130 0.601 0.384 — — 0.819 0.325 0.605 0.585 0.605 0.420 0.485 0.470 0.215 0.110 0.125 0.120 0.075 0.030 0.040 0.030 0.117 0.045 0.050 0.045 0.490 0.220 0.230 0.225 0.260 0.110 — — 0.120 0.065 0.075 0.070 4.250 3.180 3.700 3.690 0.879 0.330 0.365 0.360 0.871 0.502 — — 0.555 0.350 — — 0.889 0.652 0.800 0.785 0.320 0.175 0.225 0.215 0.830 0.515 — — 1.650 1.090 1.380 1.300 2.100 1.640 — — 1.340 0.590 0.905 0.865 0.095 0.060 0.070 0.065 1.920 0.765 1.210 1.150 0.505 0.325 0.500 0.495 2.800 2.090 2.280 2.270 2.600 1.040 2.450 2.330 1.200 0.815 0.910 0.900 0.380 0.210 0.255 0.230 1.160 0.120 — — 0.160 0.100 — — 0.705 0.454 0.585 0.575 1.030 0.647 0.970 0.950 1.346 0.890 1.020 1.010 0.085 0.050 0.060 0.055 7.620 4.950 6.900 6.700 0.735 0.377 0.630 0.605 5.630 3.665 5.550 5.500 0.330 0.075 0.110 0.110 23.505 20.059 22.240 21.860 7.310 2.510 6.700 5.760 11.000 5.460 11.000 10.780 1.100 0.774 0.980 0.950 3.396 1.387 2.180 2.120 0.650 0.450 — — 0.495 0.360 0.375 0.375 1.170 0.650 0.905 0.895 0.380 0.295 0.335 0.335 0.557 0.400 0.450 0.440 1.180 0.450 1.120 1.100 0.200 0.110 0.115 0.115 1.750 1.360 1.520 1.520 0.950 0.650 0.770 0.770 6.330 4.960 6.130 6.110 0.505 0.224 0.450 0.440 0.960 0.615 0.835 0.800 4.200 3.154 3.820 3.720

CODE 5198 2682 7609 9954 2674 4758 6556 9342 5568 5015 7214 7162 7070 7099 7181 8133 7005 7187 0168 6297 5100 9938 7221 7188 5105 5229 7076 2879 7171 8435 8044 5007 5797 8052 7018 2852 7986 5071 7195 2127 5094 7157 5082 8125 8176 7114 5835 5835PA 5265 7169 1619 7233 8907 9016 7217 7773 5101 7249 2984 7229 0149 3107 5197 3611 7197 5220 7192 7096 5649 0136 7077 3247 5151 5168 7105 5095 3298 5072 5199 7033 8443 5165 2739 5000 9601 9687 7222 7183 7223 8648 2747 7043 7167 4383 0054 7199 6211 3522 5371 5060 9466 7164 6971 7017 7153 7130 3476 5192 8362 3794 9326 5092 5232 8745 3581 2887 4235 9881 5068 9199 5098 7029 8095 5152 3778 5223 8192 6149 5001 7219 5576 7595 5916 3883 7004 5087 7002 5025 4944 7140 5065 7225 5183 9997 5436 5146 6033 3042 7095 7172 8869 6637 8117 8273 9458 9873 7168 7123 7544 7498 7765 7232 7803 5134

COUNTER AFUJIYA AISB AJIYA AKNIGHT ALCOM ANCOM ANNJOO ANZO APB APM ARANK ASTINO ASUPREM ATTA ATURMJU BHIC BIG BKOON BOILERM BOXPAK BPPLAS BRIGHT BSLCORP BTM CANONE CAP CBIP CCM CENBOND CEPCO CFM CHINWEL CHOOBEE CICB CME CMSB CNASIA COASTAL COMCORP COMFORT CSCSTEL CYL CYMAO DAIBOCI DENKO DNONCE DOLMITE DOLMITE-PA DOLPHIN DOMINAN DRBHCOM DUFU EG EKSONS EMETALL EPMB EVERGRN EWEIN FACBIND FAVCO FIBON FIMACOR FLBHD GBH GESHEN GLOTEC GOODWAY GPA GPHAROS GREENYB GSB GUH HALEX HARTA HCK HEVEA HEXZA HIAPTEK HIBISCS HIGHTEC HIL HOKHENG HUAAN HUMEIND HWGB IDEALUBB IMASPRO IRETEX JADI JASKITA JAVA JMR JOHOTIN JTIASA KARYON KEINHIN KIALIM KIANJOO KIMHIN KINSTEL KKB KNM KOBAY KOMARK KOSSAN KPOWER KSENG KSSC KYM LAFMSIA LBALUM LCTH LEONFB LEWEKO LIONCOR LIONDIV LIONIND LSTEEL LUSTER LYSAGHT MASTEEL MASTER MAYPAK MBL MELEWAR MENTIGA MERCURY METROD MIECO MINETEC MINHO MLGLOBAL MSC MUDA MULTICO MYCRON NAKA NWP NYLEX OKA ORNA PA PCHEM PENSONI PERSTIM PERWAJA PETGAS PETRONM PIE PMBTECH PMETAL PNEPCB POLY PPHB PREMIER PRESTAR PRG PWORTH QUALITY RALCO RAPID RESINTC RUBEREX SAB

CLOSING (RM) 0.410 0.290 3.600 0.250 0.720 0.365 0.630 0.230 1.090 3.820 0.630 0.650 0.125 0.540 1.190 1.700 0.680 0.110 1.020 2.610 1.750 0.325 0.225 0.250 4.140 0.065 2.130 0.970 1.430 2.000 1.200 1.810 1.370 0.750 0.055 5.000 0.185 1.670 0.650 0.885 1.240 0.865 0.385 2.230 0.365 0.185 0.400 0.510 0.725 1.170 0.980 0.545 0.890 1.150 0.260 0.710 1.140 1.090 1.050 2.870 0.550 2.190 2.580 1.400 2.050 0.055 0.260 0.090 0.410 0.220 0.110 0.900 0.595 4.600 3.150 1.400 0.880 0.215 0.175 1.420 0.715 0.350 0.050 3.000 0.075 0.845 1.950 0.235 0.100 0.145 0.090 1.140 2.060 1.440 0.185 1.000 0.705 3.160 2.070 0.080 1.680 0.460 1.590 0.570 6.340 0.565 5.430 0.370 0.430 9.190 0.465 0.590 0.470 0.120 0.030 0.050 0.230 0.160 0.075 3.700 0.360 0.640 0.400 0.790 0.225 0.560 1.300 1.700 0.885 0.070 1.180 0.500 2.280 2.390 0.910 0.240 0.125 0.135 0.580 0.960 1.010 0.055 6.780 0.605 5.500 0.110 22.180 6.000 11.000 0.980 2.120 0.475 0.375 0.905 0.335 0.450 1.100 0.115 1.520 0.770 6.110 0.440 0.800 3.820

+/– (RM) UNCH — -0.050 — -0.005 -0.005 -0.015 0.005 -0.160 -0.080 -0.005 0.005 — UNCH 0.060 UNCH -0.005 UNCH UNCH UNCH UNCH -0.005 UNCH 0.010 -0.160 -0.005 UNCH 0.030 UNCH — — -0.100 — — UNCH -0.030 — UNCH -0.020 UNCH -0.020 UNCH UNCH 0.040 -0.005 UNCH -0.115 — 0.005 -0.010 -0.030 -0.005 -0.020 -0.030 — — -0.010 -0.030 0.010 UNCH UNCH -0.010 -0.020 — -0.500 0.005 0.015 UNCH 0.015 0.005 UNCH -0.010 0.015 -0.250 — -0.030 UNCH UNCH -0.010 — -0.045 — UNCH UNCH -0.005 0.005 UNCH UNCH UNCH UNCH — — -0.010 -0.010 UNCH -0.020 -0.005 UNCH -0.120 UNCH -0.010 0.005 0.030 UNCH -0.250 0.050 0.030 UNCH — UNCH — -0.015 -0.005 -0.005 -0.005 UNCH UNCH — UNCH 0.040 -0.015 — — -0.010 UNCH — -0.150 — -0.065 UNCH -0.050 0.020 0.010 -0.060 -0.040 0.030 — — -0.005 -0.005 UNCH -0.005 -0.080 -0.015 -0.030 UNCH 0.280 -0.980 0.160 0.030 -0.030 — -0.005 0.005 0.005 0.025 -0.020 UNCH UNCH -0.005 -0.010 UNCH UNCH 0.120

VOL (‘000) 4.8 — 19 — 22 45.8 441.9 5911.1 446.5 6.6 29.6 5 — 1.3 7352 114.7 285.5 18 526.5 1 92.3 367.4 40 33 600.2 721.5 118 2.1 40.9 — — 582.9 — — 208.1 950.9 — 1391.7 1388.5 948.1 447.6 4.4 10 98.5 391.2 9156.8 9506.7 — 11.7 244.1 4421.3 3964.8 3368.4 14 — — 5577.6 1619 33.7 248.2 191.5 9.1 449 — 9734.3 17238.7 20.1 1055 28 105.1 566.1 175.9 566 2063.8 — 1865.7 87.1 359.5 3908.8 — 10.6 — 385.6 26.8 9819.4 4 19.3 62.2 30346.3 40.1 — — 85.7 4278.7 273.8 388.1 3232.8 75.4 960 358.2 198.5 16101.4 71.7 812.4 4947 173.4 41.4 10 — 251.2 — 729 1261 159 110.5 310.2 554.1 — 16127.8 5 70 — — 47.8 37.6 — 107.4 — 3813.9 2810.2 743.9 17 10 461.7 7.8 72.2 — — 73.7 100.5 145 450 11286.7 170.2 30.1 927.9 763.8 6240.4 275.4 26.6 431 — 5 101.8 60 78 1952.4 219.3 1 1.5 210 46.9 263.2 17.8

VWAP* (RM)

PE# (X)

DY (%)

0.406 35.04 — 65.91 3.608 12.06 — — 0.720 20.69 0.366 135.19 0.632 — 0.224 — 1.112 6.57 3.820 10.61 0.630 6.63 0.650 9.29 — — 0.540 1.73 1.173 — 1.718 24.75 0.677 13.52 0.110 — 1.015 15.55 2.610 15.82 1.754 14.86 0.331 — 0.218 — 0.241 — 4.191 7.35 0.065 1.31 2.132 14.31 0.932 — 1.403 10.74 — 5.80 — — 1.829 10.50 — 18.82 — — 0.055 7.86 4.993 25.47 — — 1.683 5.50 0.652 11.13 0.882 20.77 1.255 8.54 0.865 17.06 0.385 — 2.217 23.33 0.366 10.93 0.185 168.18 0.414 6.29 — — 0.720 2.94 1.163 8.35 0.992 22.69 0.539 13.59 0.903 3.33 1.155 — — 13.98 — 10.81 1.138 10.21 1.112 24.49 1.050 13.14 2.874 6.51 0.543 12.01 2.192 7.87 2.542 10.20 — 3.40 2.050 9.80 0.050 — 0.240 — 0.090 — 0.409 — 0.216 14.67 0.105 30.56 0.900 11.86 0.581 30.51 4.731 29.73 — 17.87 1.405 9.52 0.884 10.80 0.215 — 0.178 — — 7.45 0.749 8.97 — 32.71 0.050 — 2.998 20.38 0.080 — 0.845 — 1.935 15.63 0.245 — 0.100 13.33 0.145 24.17 — — — 43.51 2.072 10.03 1.463 43.11 0.184 10.11 0.990 14.41 0.705 4.70 3.139 9.78 2.069 8.27 0.080 1.05 1.685 11.29 0.462 17.16 1.597 8.54 0.563 — 6.453 21.58 0.520 — 5.433 8.27 0.370 20.22 — — 9.177 30.25 — 12.40 0.589 9.92 0.475 6.69 0.124 — 0.031 — 0.047 — 0.226 — — — 0.075 — 3.692 9.60 0.361 — — 9.86 — — 0.790 15.11 0.222 — — 15.60 1.334 9.20 — 10.57 0.881 6.08 0.065 — 1.172 6.87 0.497 1.24 2.279 109.62 2.393 35.57 0.908 44.17 0.249 5.15 — — — — 0.578 20.35 0.964 8.91 1.013 10.64 0.059 — 6.763 21.02 0.617 3.94 5.520 9.88 0.110 — 22.090 20.47 6.048 10.33 10.888 18.17 0.976 10.13 2.155 18.10 — — 0.375 9.06 0.900 7.72 0.335 81.71 0.443 11.42 1.108 33.64 0.115 20.54 1.520 — 0.770 10.64 6.118 — 0.447 9.09 0.813 17.02 3.794 17.25

— — 0.56 — 6.94 — 4.76 — 5.96 5.10 3.57 3.00 — — — — — — 1.72 — 3.43 — — — 1.21 — 2.82 2.58 4.20 — — 3.23 4.38 2.33 — 1.70 — 3.47 — — 6.45 6.36 — 2.64 — — — — — 3.67 6.12 3.67 — — — 4.93 — 0.46 2.38 4.18 1.91 5.71 5.81 10.71 — — — — — 3.41 — 5.56 — 1.63 — 1.25 5.11 1.40 — 2.46 2.10 — — 1.00 — — 1.79 — — 2.07 — 2.63 1.70 0.69 2.16 1.00 — — 2.90 — 2.38 — 1.89 — 1.58 — 1.84 5.41 — 3.48 4.30 1.69 6.38 — — — — — — — 1.81 1.56 — 3.80 — — 4.62 3.53 — — — — — 1.26 — — — — 3.45 3.13 2.48 — 2.65 5.79 6.91 — 2.71 — 1.09 4.08 4.25 — — — — 4.44 0.91 — — — — 5.68 3.75 1.31

MKT CAP (MIL) 73.8 38.2 274.1 14.5 96.7 79.9 329.3 64.6 123.0 770.1 75.6 178.2 36.5 37.9 72.7 422.4 32.7 30.4 526.3 156.7 328.5 53.4 22.1 31.3 795.5 75.5 1,146.5 443.9 171.6 89.6 49.2 542.2 150.6 34.3 24.3 5,371.9 8.4 887.8 91.0 494.5 471.2 86.5 28.9 609.3 38.1 33.4 107.5 6.3 161.0 193.1 1,894.6 95.6 188.3 188.8 44.5 117.8 964.9 241.7 89.4 630.3 53.9 537.1 266.3 261.2 164.0 296.0 28.7 88.2 55.2 73.4 58.1 250.1 63.1 7,548.4 174.6 622.3 176.3 154.5 193.0 57.7 199.3 28.0 56.1 1,437.3 90.2 93.3 156.0 31.3 94.2 65.2 15.6 144.5 192.2 1,402.2 88.0 99.0 43.7 1,403.6 322.1 83.9 433.1 991.8 108.2 71.0 4,054.2 31.9 1,962.8 35.5 64.5 7,808.7 115.5 212.4 145.7 38.6 39.5 69.6 165.1 20.5 129.9 153.8 88.0 35.0 16.8 72.7 51.0 39.2 52.2 204.0 185.9 46.6 129.6 44.8 228.0 729.1 40.4 68.1 6.9 43.2 112.7 151.8 76.0 52.1 54,240.0 78.4 546.2 61.6 43,888.3 1,620.0 844.9 78.4 2,753.5 62.5 60.0 99.5 112.9 81.9 161.8 71.8 88.1 32.3 534.3 60.4 183.4 523.1

26 Markets

M ON DAY FEB RUARY 29, 2 0 16 • TH EEDGE F I N AN C I AL DAI LY

MO

BURSA MAL AYSIA MAIN MARKET

YEAR HIGH

YEAR LOW

DAY HIGH

DAY LOW

8.280 2.688 6.450 6.390 1.256 0.777 0.920 0.900 1.870 1.130 1.640 1.590 3.270 1.439 3.090 3.000 1.070 0.700 0.890 0.860 11.320 6.410 11.300 10.740 0.970 0.280 0.335 0.330 0.400 0.230 0.270 0.260 1.350 0.526 1.070 0.990 0.440 0.230 0.260 0.245 0.770 0.370 0.420 0.395 6.350 2.600 3.130 3.050 0.695 0.365 0.535 0.520 0.850 0.480 — — 1.556 0.699 1.300 1.270 2.410 0.608 2.180 2.150 0.850 0.639 — — 1.030 0.690 0.730 0.730 0.483 0.200 0.390 0.375 2.240 1.500 1.670 1.630 2.550 1.300 2.350 2.250 2.368 0.745 1.870 1.870 3.560 1.884 3.000 2.910 5.750 3.126 5.560 5.270 0.425 0.240 0.320 0.315 0.830 0.370 0.505 0.500 15.669 13.828 15.180 15.100 15.515 14.900 — — 0.220 0.080 0.110 0.105 0.450 0.215 — — 2.210 0.700 1.700 1.660 1.720 0.685 — — 0.495 0.220 0.375 0.370 3.530 1.650 3.180 3.110 3.260 1.562 2.880 2.780 0.800 0.640 — — 2.966 1.190 2.440 2.420 2.300 1.660 1.960 1.950 7.030 2.407 5.750 5.540 0.745 0.530 — — 0.230 0.140 0.165 0.160 1.750 1.360 1.700 1.680 5.418 2.109 5.020 5.020 1.370 0.700 1.200 1.140 0.820 0.640 — — 1.633 1.133 1.290 1.250 1.427 0.790 0.835 0.800 0.400 0.275 0.340 0.340 2.150 1.377 1.750 1.720 2.900 1.629 2.650 2.450 0.670 0.490 0.535 0.500 0.580 0.410 0.450 0.415 2.407 2.029 2.200 2.150 1.550 0.895 1.440 1.380 1.893 1.001 1.220 1.200 1.108 0.790 0.910 0.845 0.270 0.170 0.180 0.180 0.830 0.510 — — CONSTRUCTION 0.560 0.260 — — 0.728 0.505 0.590 0.580 1.079 0.540 0.660 0.660 0.875 0.495 0.520 0.515 0.577 0.330 0.430 0.415 1.142 0.847 0.940 0.935 1.235 0.895 0.910 0.895 1.859 1.540 1.580 1.580 1.157 0.753 1.050 1.010 1.306 0.835 1.090 1.080 0.620 0.330 0.565 0.535 2.580 1.100 2.100 2.050 5.146 3.665 4.500 4.450 1.422 0.780 0.850 0.830 1.540 0.780 0.860 0.830 1.457 1.282 — — 1.490 1.280 — — 2.010 1.601 1.950 1.940 3.651 2.844 3.450 3.360 0.835 0.540 0.630 0.625 0.863 0.500 0.515 0.500 1.280 0.510 1.160 1.140 0.455 0.230 0.260 0.255 1.840 1.170 1.700 1.680 1.120 0.740 0.910 0.905 1.670 1.050 1.520 1.490 1.500 1.060 — — 1.440 0.680 0.740 0.700 0.485 0.325 0.365 0.350 1.336 1.020 1.180 1.160 0.370 0.190 0.345 0.340 1.680 0.840 1.190 1.140 2.701 1.497 2.300 2.190 1.009 0.360 0.375 0.360 1.604 1.172 — — 1.994 1.366 1.550 1.500 0.235 0.115 0.120 0.115 4.187 2.905 3.250 3.240 1.050 0.600 0.720 0.700 1.450 0.980 1.410 1.400 0.530 0.330 0.370 0.360 0.445 0.265 0.390 0.375 1.740 0.845 1.400 1.330 0.819 0.438 0.525 0.515 1.744 1.083 1.620 1.580 0.905 0.555 0.755 0.725 0.395 0.220 0.225 0.220 TRADING SERVICES 0.485 0.150 0.245 0.225 0.595 0.285 0.300 0.295 3.300 2.470 2.600 2.580 0.235 0.135 0.210 0.200 2.663 0.765 1.440 1.370 7.248 4.220 6.190 5.880 0.785 0.340 0.375 0.370 0.325 0.095 0.100 0.095 11.070 9.130 9.350 9.290 2.780 1.518 2.200 2.070 0.345 0.065 0.080 0.065 1.308 0.765 1.010 0.995 0.175 0.105 0.115 0.110 3.240 2.410 2.680 2.620 4.810 4.160 4.370 4.370 0.495 0.285 0.445 0.435 6.997 5.270 6.000 5.760 0.310 0.210 0.285 0.280 1.060 0.690 0.770 0.720 0.676 0.335 0.450 0.450 0.450 0.195 0.295 0.280 7.190 6.347 — — 2.841 1.765 2.160 2.100 0.477 0.336 0.420 0.405 2.907 1.900 2.050 2.050 0.855 0.610 0.700 0.700 0.550 0.330 — — 3.294 2.858 3.180 3.130 0.248 0.119 0.145 0.140 1.360 0.555 0.970 0.965 4.488 3.666 4.080 3.970 1.090 0.450 0.480 0.450 2.140 0.990 2.000 1.970 3.930 1.960 3.460 3.390 1.092 0.637 0.800 0.795 0.562 0.332 — — 0.633 0.410 — — 0.105 0.060 0.090 0.090 1.040 0.650 0.805 0.805 0.060 0.040 0.045 0.045 1.987 1.390 1.670 1.630 0.150 0.085 0.090 0.085 2.822 0.990 1.330 1.270 1.837 0.900 1.080 1.030 0.685 0.480 0.575 0.560 1.679 1.284 1.600 1.570 5.869 3.530 3.980 3.870 1.710 0.979 1.420 1.380 0.430 0.240 0.270 0.250 1.476 0.512 1.090 1.040 0.450 0.210 0.240 0.215 0.325 0.195 0.230 0.225 3.817 2.594 3.360 3.320 0.390 0.190 0.320 0.310 1.097 0.810 0.900 0.900 1.590 1.062 1.350 1.320 1.260 0.650 1.260 1.160 * Volume Weighted Average Price

CODE

COUNTER

CLOSING (RM)

+/– (RM)

VOL (‘000)

VWAP* (RM)

PE# (X)

DY (%)

MKT CAP (MIL)

YEAR HIGH 1.380 2.500 0.699 1.537 0.340 0.450 2.794 1.829 4.620 9.266 1.748 0.503 2.390 0.070 0.410 7.720 3.120 3.467 0.020 0.835 6.700 0.910 1.630 0.375 1.980 0.550 0.450 2.000 0.408 1.944 4.400 1.557 0.610 0.390 0.480 0.350 0.800 1.940 2.708 1.855 0.190 7.034 1.317 3.457 1.689 0.685 1.000 2.630 1.400 9.275 2.754 0.540 0.125 0.255 0.415 2.380 1.160 0.135 1.007 0.831 1.759 0.155 2.750 0.501 0.745 2.346 1.420 0.170 1.527 1.570 0.665 0.250 7.047 26.300 0.250 7.269 0.270 0.430 5.116 3.270 3.310 0.202 0.200 0.410 0.921 0.935 0.660 0.205 2.400 0.285 0.610 1.310 1.470 1.810 9.227 0.900 2.915 1.530 2.527 3.427 0.265 2.658 0.525 1.688 2.219 14.567 1.850 0.555 0.410 7.526 0.740 1.500 0.500 3.006 1.321 3.100 2.750 1.505 0.750 2.600 0.745 3.010 0.545 4.541 1.460 0.130 3.236 0.835 1.649 FINANCE 14.355 2.961 4.717 13.200 13.400 6.224 1.970 4.148 8.811 6.282 0.500 1.364 14.037 10.971 16.614 2.460 1.035 0.890 0.215 2.650 0.764 15.804 1.000 3.195 9.190 2.189 4.180 2.130 1.477 19.304 0.330 8.001 0.763 4.143 2.023

9822 7811 5170 7247 9237 4731 7239 7366 7073 5145 5163 4324 5181 7115 7155 7248 7132 5665 7143 6904 7207 7235 7106 5012 4022 5149 4448 4448P 5178 7097 7439 9741 6378 7034 7374 7854 7285 5010 7113 7173 4359 7100 7133 7227 4995 6963 5142 7226 7111 7231 7050 7025 5009 4243 7245 5048 7020 7014

SAM SAPIND SCABLE SCGM SCIB SCIENTX SCNWOLF SCOMIEN SEACERA SEALINK SEB SHELL SIGGAS SKBSHUT SKPRES SLP SMISCOR SSTEEL STONE SUBUR SUCCESS SUPERLN SUPERMX TAANN TADMAX TAS TASEK TASEK-PA TATGIAP TAWIN TECGUAN TECNIC TEKALA TGUAN TIENWAH TIMWELL TOMYPAK TONGHER TOPGLOV TOYOINK TURIYA UCHITEC ULICORP UMSNGB VERSATL VS WASEONG WATTA WEIDA WELLCAL WONG WOODLAN WTHORSE WTK WZSATU YILAI YKGI YLI

6.440 0.910 1.640 3.000 0.860 10.800 0.335 0.260 0.990 0.255 0.400 3.080 0.535 0.500 1.280 2.170 0.710 0.730 0.380 1.670 2.270 1.870 2.920 5.270 0.320 0.505 15.100 14.900 0.105 0.230 1.680 1.320 0.370 3.160 2.790 0.700 2.420 1.950 5.550 0.610 0.165 1.680 5.020 1.150 0.720 1.280 0.800 0.340 1.720 2.620 0.535 0.450 2.200 1.430 1.200 0.850 0.180 0.585

-0.010 -0.010 0.070 -0.060 0.010 -0.200 0.005 UNCH -0.050 -0.005 UNCH 0.060 0.010 — -0.010 0.010 — -0.040 -0.015 -0.010 0.070 -0.020 -0.070 -0.290 UNCH 0.015 -0.080 — -0.010 — -0.030 — -0.005 0.180 -0.070 — -0.010 -0.020 -0.190 — UNCH -0.010 -0.300 -0.020 — 0.010 -0.015 UNCH -0.030 -0.190 0.025 0.030 UNCH 0.020 0.050 -0.030 -0.005 —

38.9 31.2 1253.3 44.8 32 235.4 489.9 65 291.6 33 53.9 1109 162 — 950.1 146 — 116 426.1 2 498.1 16.2 2871.8 778.1 26.2 106 8.7 — 96 — 27.7 — 58.5 2081.6 445.1 — 66.3 7 2907.1 — 16.9 417.8 2.1 157.5 — 4984 1207.9 21 8 6222.1 95.1 6 9 1586 107 1043.8 20.7 —

6.419 8.99 0.916 15.83 1.617 9.60 3.027 19.40 0.882 — 11.002 12.92 0.331 — 0.262 23.64 1.000 33.67 0.249 637.50 0.400 — 3.085 — 0.521 15.64 — — 1.288 18.66 2.166 22.14 — 23.13 0.730 — 0.380 — 1.650 — 2.305 14.17 1.870 10.01 2.945 19.34 5.352 13.05 0.320 2.39 0.502 6.65 15.148 20.10 — — 0.109 — — — 1.679 7.60 — 0.53 0.371 — 3.142 17.93 2.822 11.72 — 42.94 2.432 12.67 1.956 22.89 5.636 19.16 — 92.42 0.164 21.71 1.689 14.76 5.020 27.14 1.166 7.80 — — 1.266 22.70 0.809 8.26 0.340 — 1.738 8.33 2.557 21.06 0.529 — 0.421 81.82 2.172 19.10 1.406 18.55 1.214 14.42 0.880 13.84 0.180 — — —

1.85 6.59 1.37 3.11 — 2.04 — — 3.03 — 5.00 — 1.31 — 1.53 1.38 3.52 — — 2.99 3.52 2.67 1.71 3.80 — — 7.28 7.38 — — — — — 2.22 6.45 — 3.31 6.15 1.80 1.64 — 5.95 1.79 2.61 — 4.45 5.63 — 1.74 3.51 — — 4.55 1.28 1.67 2.35 — —

555.9 66.2 520.0 396.0 63.3 2,484.0 29.3 88.9 187.7 127.5 32.0 924.0 100.3 20.0 1,432.6 536.7 31.8 306.2 34.2 349.0 272.4 149.6 1,986.1 1,953.8 142.5 90.9 1,866.7 5.0 16.3 14.8 67.4 53.3 56.6 332.7 269.2 62.3 264.9 248.5 6,962.3 65.3 37.7 663.6 728.9 92.0 84.5 1,496.1 619.9 28.7 229.3 869.0 49.1 18.0 528.0 688.3 333.9 136.0 62.7 59.4

7007 7078 6173 5190 5932 8761 8591 7528 5253 8877 7047 9261 5398 5226 5169 5169PA 5169PB 6238 3336 5268 8834 4723 9083 7161 3565 5171 9628 5129 5006 9571 5924 5085 5703 8311 7055 5070 7145 9598 5205 5263 9717 5054 5622 5042 9679 7028 2283

ARK AZRB BDB BENALEC BPURI BREM CRESBLD DKLS ECONBHD EKOVEST FAJAR GADANG GAMUDA GBGAQRS HOHUP HOHUP-PA HOHUP-PB HSL IJM IKHMAS IREKA JAKS JETSON KERJAYA KEURO KIMLUN LEBTECH MELATI MERGE MITRA MTDACPI MUDAJYA MUHIBAH PESONA PLB PRTASCO PSIPTEK PTARAS SENDAI SUNCON SYCAL TRC TRIPLC TSRCAP WCT ZECON ZELAN

0.320 0.590 0.660 0.515 0.420 0.940 0.910 1.580 1.010 1.080 0.545 2.060 4.470 0.850 0.840 1.340 1.290 1.950 3.400 0.630 0.500 1.140 0.255 1.690 0.905 1.520 1.500 0.700 0.365 1.160 0.340 1.160 2.200 0.365 1.260 1.530 0.115 3.250 0.705 1.400 0.365 0.380 1.340 0.520 1.580 0.755 0.220

— UNCH -0.015 -0.005 0.005 -0.010 0.005 0.020 -0.040 -0.020 -0.015 -0.030 -0.010 0.010 0.020 — — 0.020 -0.010 UNCH -0.015 0.010 -0.005 -0.010 -0.005 0.010 — -0.040 -0.005 0.010 UNCH 0.010 -0.080 -0.005 — UNCH UNCH 0.010 -0.010 UNCH -0.005 0.005 -0.010 0.010 -0.030 UNCH UNCH

— 13 11 153 72 213.9 246.8 1 163.4 11.5 970.1 904.9 1116.8 187.4 355.6 — — 12.1 3774.9 128.9 106.8 2077.7 254.3 166.5 158 83.6 — 5.7 25 2280.2 55.7 454.4 443.6 1058.9 — 4523.8 288.3 8.5 157.5 1512.9 192.8 151 165.1 118 1945.5 10.9 1139.2

— 16.75 0.581 13.47 0.660 8.19 0.518 — 0.417 14.79 0.940 13.68 0.899 4.39 1.580 6.81 1.021 10.17 1.084 46.15 0.549 — 2.073 5.57 4.474 16.17 0.840 180.85 0.841 4.02 — — — — 1.943 14.35 3.403 15.60 0.628 — 0.508 — 1.150 26.03 0.255 30.72 1.688 9.87 0.909 54.52 1.502 7.65 — 64.10 0.731 14.93 0.364 5.01 1.168 8.15 0.342 — 1.160 — 2.233 11.64 0.369 16.44 — 26.75 1.522 12.14 0.116 18.25 3.244 11.13 0.709 8.49 1.407 14.04 0.364 3.43 0.383 12.67 1.352 11.70 0.520 11.90 1.600 10.57 0.737 — 0.224 6.09

— 3.39 5.30 0.58 4.76 3.19 4.12 1.90 2.48 1.85 2.29 2.43 2.68 — — 1.87 1.16 1.33 2.50 — — — — 1.78 — 2.50 — 2.50 — 2.87 — 7.76 1.82 2.74 3.97 5.23 — 5.54 1.77 — — 0.47 — 1.71 1.24 — —

14.7 285.3 200.5 418.1 98.1 324.7 161.0 146.5 540.4 923.9 179.8 484.3 10,755.2 332.3 291.5 10.7 25.4 1,136.2 12,179.4 327.6 85.4 499.7 47.9 218.2 907.5 456.9 204.7 84.0 24.5 744.9 78.8 640.8 1,035.5 238.7 115.0 516.2 36.5 529.0 545.7 1,810.1 116.9 182.6 88.8 90.7 1,910.9 89.9 185.9

5238 5166 6599 7315 5099 5014 5115 0159 6351 7083 5194 5210 1481 6399 7048 7579 6888 5021 7251 7241 6998 5032 5248 3395 5196 4219 6025 1562 7036 9474 2771 5257 5245 2925 7117 7209 7016 5104 5136 5037 5184 0091 5141 5132 7212 7277 5908 5216 2097 5259 5036 7471 1368 0064 5081 5208 7189

AAX AEGB AEON AHB AIRASIA AIRPORT ALAM AMEDIA AMWAY ANALABS APFT ARMADA ASB ASTRO ATLAN AWC AXIATA AYS BARAKAH BHS BINTAI BIPORT BJAUTO BJCORP BJFOOD BJLAND BJMEDIA BJTOTO BORNOIL BRAHIMS BSTEAD CARIMIN CARING CCB CENTURY CHEETAH CHUAN CNI COMPLET COMPUGT CYPARK DAYA DAYANG DELEUM DESTINI DIALOG DKSH DSONIC EASTLND EATECH EDARAN EDEN EDGENTA EFFICEN EIG EITA EKIB

0.230 0.300 2.600 0.210 1.390 5.880 0.370 0.100 9.350 2.200 0.070 1.000 0.110 2.660 4.370 0.435 5.800 0.285 0.770 0.450 0.280 7.100 2.160 0.405 2.050 0.700 0.415 3.130 0.140 0.970 4.080 0.480 2.000 3.390 0.795 0.450 0.440 0.090 0.805 0.045 1.660 0.090 1.310 1.070 0.565 1.570 3.980 1.390 0.270 1.090 0.235 0.225 3.340 0.310 0.900 1.350 1.260

-0.015 UNCH 0.020 UNCH -0.050 -0.280 -0.005 0.005 0.050 0.150 -0.005 UNCH -0.005 0.030 0.020 -0.005 -0.180 0.005 0.030 -0.005 -0.015 — 0.010 -0.010 UNCH 0.005 — -0.020 UNCH -0.010 0.060 0.015 0.010 -0.020 -0.015 — — -0.005 0.005 -0.005 UNCH UNCH 0.040 0.040 -0.005 -0.020 0.080 UNCH 0.015 -0.010 -0.005 UNCH -0.050 UNCH UNCH 0.040 0.090

35772.3 88 173.9 199 41075.7 1202 2012.9 146.9 11.6 10 40879.2 7920.7 161.5 1415.5 1 1227.6 5686.8 14 985.2 450.3 2331.9 — 671.4 16697.4 72.9 10 — 619.5 6281.6 140.4 226.2 20.9 30 84.7 725.5 — — 60 20 20 58 1059.5 4284.9 747.9 1231.7 4145.7 79.7 2111.1 270.2 12.7 18.2 135 28.2 2248.5 6.5 192 382.5

— 33.33 1.92 — 2.16 1.29 — — 4.28 1.36 — 1.63 2.27 4.70 6.29 — 3.79 4.39 2.60 — — 3.10 4.58 2.47 1.10 — — 5.57 — — 5.15 — 1.00 1.47 5.66 1.67 1.30 3.33 3.73 — 3.01 — 5.34 5.14 — 1.40 2.39 1.20 — 2.06 — — 1.50 — 3.89 2.96 —

954.1 123.0 3,650.4 33.6 3,868.3 9,756.0 342.1 23.9 1,537.0 132.1 30.4 5,866.3 73.0 13,845.3 1,108.5 112.9 51,140.4 108.4 634.9 188.6 60.1 3,266.0 2,474.6 1,892.6 773.7 3,500.2 97.6 4,228.7 416.2 229.2 4,219.4 112.3 435.4 341.5 297.4 57.4 74.2 64.8 98.6 96.0 412.8 156.2 1,149.0 428.0 517.9 8,177.0 627.5 1,876.5 66.3 549.4 14.1 70.1 2,717.1 219.8 167.0 175.5 115.7

# PE is calculated based on latest 12 months reported Earnings Per Share

0.234 0.300 2.589 0.204 1.401 6.019 0.372 0.097 9.341 2.135 0.070 1.000 0.115 2.659 4.370 0.436 5.868 0.281 0.747 0.450 0.287 — 2.149 0.408 2.050 0.700 — 3.147 0.142 0.969 4.026 0.470 1.986 3.403 0.797 — — 0.090 0.805 0.045 1.646 0.089 1.290 1.050 0.565 1.581 3.972 1.402 0.259 1.058 0.225 0.227 3.332 0.313 0.900 1.331 1.208

— — 21.42 25.30 — — 6.88 — 18.73 13.33 — — — 25.36 24.16 14.31 19.66 9.50 16.31 — — 26.63 12.05 2.35 37.07 — — 12.97 13.21 — 13.70 — 33.06 7.56 6.80 46.88 1100 — 38.33 — 7.83 — 6.10 8.55 23.06 27.99 14.26 39.83 1.92 18.29 36.72 — 11.75 34.83 11.38 8.97 20.90

YEAR LOW

DAY HIGH

DAY LOW

0.966 1.210 1.180 1.500 2.200 2.120 0.435 0.450 0.440 1.217 1.280 1.280 0.145 0.175 0.170 0.110 — — 1.892 2.380 2.350 0.815 1.690 1.660 3.722 4.240 4.190 6.510 8.000 7.780 1.034 1.560 1.530 0.380 0.440 0.410 1.773 2.390 2.350 0.060 — — 0.265 0.300 0.290 3.466 7.640 7.570 1.479 2.840 2.800 2.850 3.030 2.870 0.005 0.015 0.010 0.250 0.375 0.355 5.232 6.550 6.500 0.651 0.820 0.800 0.920 1.020 1.010 0.205 0.220 0.210 1.450 1.800 1.770 0.355 — — 0.290 — — 1.638 1.790 1.770 0.250 — — 1.300 1.370 1.300 3.768 4.360 4.340 0.995 1.020 0.995 0.350 0.580 0.565 0.190 0.205 0.205 0.235 0.275 0.265 0.120 — — 0.500 0.650 0.630 0.871 1.920 1.840 2.430 2.530 2.490 1.165 1.630 1.610 0.135 0.155 0.150 5.516 6.290 6.200 0.550 0.620 0.565 1.940 2.250 2.180 0.997 1.380 1.320 0.484 0.655 0.645 0.650 — — 1.886 2.310 2.210 0.875 1.030 0.995 7.308 8.960 8.510 1.490 1.690 1.610 0.330 0.430 0.425 0.060 0.075 0.070 0.155 0.190 0.180 0.245 0.290 0.275 1.241 2.170 2.100 0.560 0.700 0.700 0.070 0.075 0.075 0.660 — — 0.590 0.700 0.695 1.231 1.540 1.500 0.085 0.110 0.105 1.226 2.430 2.320 0.378 0.425 0.420 0.449 0.590 0.585 0.865 0.900 0.865 0.896 1.240 1.220 0.055 0.065 0.060 0.841 1.240 1.230 0.995 — — 0.230 0.270 0.260 0.135 — — 4.592 6.550 6.270 17.936 25.320 24.960 0.030 — — 5.113 6.060 5.850 0.175 — — 0.210 — — 2.150 2.210 2.150 1.565 2.840 2.760 2.460 2.580 2.500 0.103 — — 0.100 0.170 0.165 0.340 0.395 0.385 0.555 0.575 0.560 0.572 0.800 0.800 0.460 0.505 0.500 0.090 — — 1.556 2.290 2.200 0.135 0.205 0.190 0.195 0.225 0.210 0.858 — — 1.270 1.300 1.280 1.340 1.510 1.450 6.535 7.850 7.590 0.720 — — 1.360 1.950 1.920 1.340 1.440 1.370 2.290 2.430 2.380 2.448 — — 0.100 0.120 0.110 1.877 2.330 2.250 0.330 0.345 0.340 1.210 1.590 1.540 1.490 1.530 1.530 10.103 13.300 13.120 1.177 1.760 1.690 0.300 0.320 0.305 0.130 0.145 0.140 5.908 6.660 6.600 0.460 0.655 0.655 0.882 1.210 1.190 0.340 0.400 0.400 2.661 — — 0.900 — — 2.300 2.820 2.790 0.860 0.980 0.960 1.160 1.180 1.170 0.500 — — 1.560 1.800 1.660 0.360 0.720 0.720 2.230 2.500 2.500 0.420 — — 3.309 4.000 3.840 0.755 1.020 0.995 0.025 0.035 0.030 2.310 2.880 2.790 0.434 0.780 0.765 1.349 1.570 1.540 10.780 2.073 3.070 9.770 9.900 4.126 1.342 3.170 7.480 3.930 0.310 1.230 11.650 7.327 12.153 1.778 0.572 0.765 0.110 1.589 0.460 13.847 0.626 2.650 8.180 1.260 2.890 1.290 1.227 16.745 0.250 5.010 0.505 3.654 1.100

11.800 2.200 3.600 — — 4.500 — 3.570 8.540 4.480 0.360 1.270 13.140 — 14.160 2.450 0.710 0.885 0.115 — 0.490 14.980 1.000 — 8.700 1.390 3.000 1.540 1.380 18.460 0.275 5.450 0.530 3.860 1.210

11.440 2.150 3.500 — — 4.380 — 3.430 8.360 4.320 0.355 1.270 13.040 — 14.000 2.400 0.700 0.885 0.110 — 0.485 14.860 0.980 — 8.430 1.360 2.910 1.470 1.370 18.360 0.270 5.310 0.520 3.840 1.170

CODE

5056 6939 9318 7210 0128 9377 5209 0078 4715 3182 3204 7676 7668 7110 7253 3034 2062 5008 7013 5255 5225 5614 5673 8923 0058 8672 5079 6491 0151 5035 5878 5843 9121 4847 6874 7170 8486 5143 3859 5264 3514 6012 5077 5983 4502 5090 7234 3069 5186 3816 2194 0059 0043 3891 3905 0138 9806 4464 5533 0172 5201 3018 5260 8419 5125 5657 5041 6254 5133 7108 0047 7080 5219 5681 7027 7081 7201 7163 4634 5204 8346 5272 0037 8885 8567 5147 7185 9113 0099 7158 7045 7053 9792 5250 4197 9431 5218 5242 6084 9865 1201 6521 5173 8524 5140 5347 8702 7228 7206 4863 0101 8397 7218 5711 5167 7137 5243 7091 5754 7250 7240 5016 7692 5246 5267 7122 7293 7066 4677 5139 5185 2488 1163 1163PA 1015 5088 5258 1818 1023 2143 5228 5819 5274 1082 6688 3379 3379PA 3441 5096 6483 8621 1198 1058 1155 1171 6459 5237 6009 1295 9296 1066 4898 6139 5230

COUNTER

CLOSING (RM)

+/– (RM)

VOL (‘000)

VWAP* (RM)

PE# (X)

DY (%)

MKT CAP (MIL)

0.85 3.49 6.23 3.91 — — 4.92 0.60 1.50 0.50 2.24 1.36 6.28 — — 2.63 1.94 5.21 — — 0.46 4.27 — — 1.40 — — 4.75 3.64 3.82 1.80 4.00 — — — — — 2.69 7.03 — 1.33 3.21 1.75 3.65 7.58 6.53 — 3.62 — 2.30 2.11 2.35 — — — 0.45 — — 2.41 — 4.00 — — 5.36 3.56 — 3.07 — 1.61 1.30 — — 1.08 2.39 — 5.05 2.11 — 6.09 1.15 — — 2.73 — 5.31 4.06 8.91 — 3.62 — — 3.60 10.00 1.68 3.24 1.37 1.04 2.13 6.28 2.33 — 3.00 — 4.17 2.94 2.20 8.62 — — 3.23 0.21 3.36 — 1.36 5.21 2.13 1.02 3.81 — 2.28 — 2.80 — 2.86 1.47 — 0.53 — 6.05

357.0 312.9 211.3 221.6 179.1 20.4 3,017.4 2,310.0 24,939.8 29,945.6 468.6 103.9 483.2 5.2 46.4 17,101.1 516.9 197.2 101.5 423.8 53,453.4 146.0 73.9 33.4 249.2 72.3 46.0 495.7 60.5 130.5 4,589.1 499.0 85.0 82.6 153.0 48.1 150.5 493.2 3,580.0 8,150.0 158.1 46,788.2 570.0 855.7 1,464.1 1,088.3 31.9 538.2 1,648.0 38,790.4 5,054.8 69.2 56.9 542.5 671.4 5,121.0 42.1 64.8 85.4 550.6 694.9 107.5 545.2 117.6 363.7 979.0 404.1 56.5 399.0 1,198.8 324.0 35.3 1,205.4 24,975.4 2.8 1,537.8 118.4 11.8 1,154.6 1,369.7 258.0 905.6 216.5 339.1 382.9 108.8 93.3 22.7 785.6 373.9 503.5 65.3 972.5 1,837.7 48,781.7 29.6 11,684.7 233.4 1,765.2 156.8 403.7 671.5 408.0 1,886.8 306.0 74,382.8 215.9 122.1 162.6 24,877.5 1,135.0 500.6 16.4 189.1 103.7 114.7 2,118.8 151.7 58.7 483.0 95.0 168.0 19.2 13,230.8 183.6 21.3 3,070.8 122.7 16,946.6

5.07 4.88 4.00 0.50 0.59 4.51 6.67 3.47 4.06 1.79 — 5.40 3.06 0.84 2.66 4.15 1.41 4.52 — 4.00 2.06 4.70 6.09 3.45 6.68 — — — 6.72 3.03 5.56 1.08 3.40 3.73 3.39

1,687.7 4,177.3 5,573.2 1,681.2 929.7 13,563.8 384.4 5,592.2 4,544.2 38,116.9 101.7 234.7 28,440.5 2,493.7 16,180.0 614.9 492.3 117.4 71.6 300.0 354.9 4,946.6 288.3 586.9 83,267.8 3,888.8 632.8 1,051.1 337.0 71,664.3 368.2 16,449.5 907.3 3,141.0 894.6

ENGTEX FIAMMA FITTERS FREIGHT FRONTKN FSBM GASMSIA GDEX GENM GENTING GKENT GUNUNG HAIO HAISAN HANDAL HAPSENG HARBOUR HARISON HUBLINE ICON IHH ILB IPMUDA JIANKUN JOBST KAMDAR KBES KFIMA KGB KNUSFOR KPJ KPS KPSCB KTB KUB LFECORP LIONFIB LUXCHEM MAGNUM MALAKOF MARCO MAXIS MAYBULK MBMR MEDIA MEDIAC MESB MFCB MHB MISC MMCCORP MMODE MTRONIC MUIIND MULPHA MYEG NATWIDE NICORP OCB OCK OLDTOWN OLYMPIA OWG PANSAR PANTECH PARKSON PBA PDZ PENERGY PERDANA PERISAI PERMAJU PESTECH PETDAG PETONE PHARMA PICORP PJBUMI POS PRESBHD PRKCORP RANHILL RGB RPB SALCON SAMCHEM SAMUDRA SANBUMI SCICOM SCOMI SCOMIES SEEHUP SEG SEM SIME SJC SKPETRO SOLID STAR SUIWAH SUMATEC SURIA SYSCORP TALIWRK TASCO TENAGA TEXCHEM TGOFFS THHEAVY TM TMCLIFE TNLOGIS TOCEAN TSTORE TURBO UMS UMWOG UNIMECH UTUSAN UZMA VOIR WARISAN WIDETEC WPRTS XINHWA YFG YINSON YONGTAI YTL

1.180 2.150 0.440 1.280 0.170 0.160 2.350 1.670 4.200 8.000 1.560 0.440 2.390 0.065 0.290 7.600 2.840 2.880 0.010 0.360 6.500 0.820 1.020 0.220 1.780 0.365 0.365 1.790 0.275 1.310 4.350 1.000 0.575 0.205 0.275 0.265 0.650 1.860 2.490 1.630 0.150 6.230 0.570 2.190 1.320 0.645 0.760 2.210 1.030 8.690 1.660 0.425 0.075 0.185 0.285 2.130 0.700 0.075 0.830 0.695 1.500 0.105 2.330 0.420 0.590 0.895 1.220 0.065 1.240 1.540 0.265 0.180 6.460 25.140 0.055 5.940 0.180 0.235 2.150 2.830 2.580 1.600 0.165 0.395 0.565 0.800 0.505 0.120 2.210 0.195 0.215 1.250 1.300 1.490 7.710 0.730 1.950 1.410 2.390 2.570 0.115 2.330 0.340 1.560 1.530 13.180 1.740 0.320 0.145 6.620 0.655 1.190 0.400 2.760 0.960 2.820 0.980 1.180 0.530 1.660 0.720 2.500 0.430 3.880 1.020 0.035 2.810 0.765 1.570

-0.050 947.7 -0.020 126.1 -0.010 573.5 -0.020 10.3 UNCH 3326.9 — — -0.050 25.5 0.010 290.9 UNCH 5124.1 0.240 5112.8 UNCH 160 0.025 48.6 UNCH 92.8 — — -0.020 24 -0.030 768.1 0.010 88.2 -0.030 13 -0.005 10976.4 -0.010 4223.7 -0.030 6759.8 0.010 11 UNCH 50 0.005 23.5 0.010 13.4 — — — — UNCH 38.1 — — -0.060 23.3 UNCH 528.3 UNCH 462.7 0.010 2225.1 UNCH 365 0.010 345.8 — — UNCH 26 -0.020 269.9 -0.060 431.6 UNCH 2888 -0.005 753.7 -0.030 3686.7 -0.025 2681.4 -0.090 579.4 -0.030 120.3 UNCH 162.5 — — -0.090 680 0.020 1046.6 0.060 5681 -0.010 1176.5 -0.005 33.4 0.005 121 0.005 763 0.010 3747.7 -0.030 8692.9 -0.010 9.3 -0.005 243.2 — — -0.005 117.9 -0.040 141.5 -0.005 84.5 -0.110 1106.4 -0.005 45.4 0.005 150.9 -0.015 3228.9 UNCH 131 UNCH 2861.1 UNCH 136 — — -0.010 16244.4 — — 0.190 687.4 0.200 1695.1 — — 0.100 106.8 — — — — -0.040 2593.3 UNCH 711.7 0.080 11.3 — — UNCH 1212 0.010 82.1 UNCH 3732.7 UNCH 63.5 0.005 18 — — -0.030 271.1 -0.005 17354.5 UNCH 6461 — — UNCH 168.3 -0.030 718.7 0.110 5438.4 — — 0.060 8468.2 0.020 380.6 UNCH 125.3 — — UNCH 7319 0.060 7.1 -0.005 51.9 UNCH 1465.2 UNCH 32.3 UNCH 5944.7 UNCH 19.9 0.015 614 UNCH 2871.9 -0.020 7659.8 UNCH 28 -0.020 439.1 UNCH 3.3 — — — — 0.020 17 0.020 3408.1 -0.020 259.1 — — -0.130 421.1 0.005 10 UNCH 0.7 — — -0.040 2499.4 UNCH 252.2 UNCH 625 -0.030 291.8 -0.005 873.6 0.010 5852.9

1.192 8.01 2.157 5.21 0.444 18.33 1.280 10.38 0.170 15.04 — — 2.358 25.32 1.663 67.34 4.208 19.37 7.947 22.48 1.548 12.13 0.432 66.67 2.365 14.69 — — 0.290 8.06 7.601 16.02 2.811 10.16 2.889 11.63 0.010 — 0.361 20.11 6.516 70.27 0.802 — 1.012 8.15 0.211 — 1.772 9.81 — 11.03 — — 1.775 9.93 — 15.36 1.310 5.50 4.349 28.01 1.001 6.78 0.572 6.25 0.205 10.73 0.270 — — 29.12 0.639 — 1.865 15.87 2.509 14.19 1.622 3.33 0.154 8.02 6.230 26.85 0.576 — 2.201 8.14 1.331 18.94 0.650 8.35 — 100.00 2.260 6.38 1.016 37.32 8.675 15.71 1.642 3.12 0.428 8.05 0.070 44.12 0.185 — 0.282 3.55 2.127 59.83 0.700 — 0.075 — — 12.22 0.696 18.94 1.515 14.15 0.107 4.04 2.373 27.54 0.424 13.50 0.590 9.47 0.884 19.98 1.226 13.88 0.065 — 1.239 9.17 — — 0.264 8.63 — — 6.465 18.42 25.139 31.62 — 0.38 5.930 18.31 — 16.07 — — 2.171 12.53 2.810 84.23 2.502 2.74 — 186.05 0.167 10.38 0.390 — 0.569 19.96 0.800 15.66 0.502 6.28 — — 2.249 21.13 0.199 6.63 0.214 8.50 — — 1.291 27.03 1.480 30.72 7.750 22.26 — 45.06 1.935 18.68 1.413 26.31 2.399 16.81 — 19.31 0.115 6.61 2.284 5.14 0.342 43.59 1.563 42.98 1.530 9.97 13.186 12.95 1.725 27.66 0.312 — 0.143 — 6.623 35.40 0.655 57.96 1.203 7.58 0.400 43.01 — 14.93 — 9.06 2.801 7.17 0.969 19.44 1.177 13.11 — — 1.708 27.53 0.720 — 2.500 — — 20.19 3.897 26.22 1.000 10.59 0.034 — 2.817 10.27 0.769 — 1.560 16.24

AEONCR AFFIN AFG ALLIANZ ALLIANZ-PA AMBANK APEX BIMB BURSA CIMB ECM ELKDESA HLBANK HLCAP HLFG HWANG INSAS INSAS-PA JOHAN KAF KENANGA LPI MAA MANULFE MAYBANK MBSB MNRB MPHBCAP P&O PBBANK RCECAP RHBCAP TA TAKAFUL TUNEPRO

11.720 2.150 3.600 9.930 10.100 4.500 1.800 3.520 8.500 4.470 0.355 1.270 13.120 10.100 14.100 2.410 0.710 0.885 0.115 2.500 0.485 14.900 0.985 2.900 8.530 1.370 2.970 1.470 1.370 18.460 0.270 5.350 0.530 3.850 1.190

0.280 38.8 -0.010 171 0.060 1432.5 — — — — 0.160 3307.1 — — -0.020 181.8 0.010 197.8 0.220 21884.2 UNCH 1170.8 -0.010 188.4 UNCH 777.9 — — 0.080 384.5 -0.030 16.5 0.005 314.5 -0.005 0.6 UNCH 18 — — UNCH 48.1 -0.080 143.3 0.010 1182.5 — — -0.110 20859.8 UNCH 502.7 -0.030 160.6 -0.030 503.4 -0.010 65.4 0.080 7407.6 0.005 251 -0.070 1107.5 0.010 91.6 -0.030 728.6 -0.020 1667.2

11.651 2.175 3.588 — — 4.470 — 3.522 8.502 4.417 0.355 1.270 13.120 — 14.097 2.416 0.704 0.885 0.111 — 0.488 14.890 0.989 — 8.528 1.375 2.956 1.485 1.375 18.445 0.270 5.372 0.525 3.847 1.189

58.31 8.70 11.32 5.67 — 8.15 22.19 9.96 22.85 16.94 4.97 9.10 10.96 32.98 9.33 12.87 12.26 — — 51.12 — 15.41 — 13.12 11.23 5.53 12.62 16.59 13.70 14.09 7.89 8.50 — 20.14 12.98

PROP 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 2 2 1 2 0 2 1 2 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 2 2 0 1 2 2 0 1 0 0 1 2 0 1 1 0 1 1 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 1 1 0 3 2 2 2 0 1 2 0 1 1 1 0 3 0 1 6 3 1 3 0 0 8 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 1 2 1 1 2 0 0 MINI 1 PLAN 1 17 9 1 0 9 0 8 2 11 1 1 1 2 3 0 0 4 24 3 3 0 3 2 1 1 2 5 0 1 0 4 3 0 5 2 0 1 1 2 6 27 HOTE 0 1 0 6 TECH 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 2 1 0 0 6 0 3 0 0 5 0 10 * Volu

Markets 2 7

M O N DAY F E BRUA RY 29 , 2016 • T HEED G E FINA NCIA L DA ILY

BURSA MAL AYSIA MAIN MARKET . ACE MARKET

AP IL) 7.0 2.9 1.3 1.6 9.1 0.4 7.4 0.0 9.8 5.6 8.6 3.9 3.2 5.2 6.4 1.1 6.9 7.2 1.5 3.8 3.4 6.0 3.9 3.4 9.2 2.3 6.0 5.7 0.5 0.5 9.1 9.0 5.0 2.6 3.0 8.1 0.5 3.2 0.0 0.0 8.1 8.2 0.0 5.7 4.1 8.3 1.9 8.2 8.0 0.4 4.8 9.2 6.9 2.5 1.4 1.0 2.1 4.8 5.4 0.6 4.9 7.5 5.2 7.6 3.7 9.0 4.1 6.5 9.0 8.8 4.0 5.3 5.4 5.4 2.8 7.8 8.4 1.8 4.6 9.7 8.0 5.6 6.5 9.1 2.9 8.8 3.3 2.7 5.6 3.9 3.5 5.3 2.5 7.7 1.7 9.6 4.7 3.4 5.2 6.8 3.7 1.5 8.0 6.8 6.0 2.8 5.9 2.1 2.6 7.5 5.0 0.6 6.4 9.1 3.7 4.7 8.8 1.7 8.7 3.0 5.0 8.0 9.2 0.8 3.6 1.3 0.8 2.7 6.6 7.7 7.3 3.2 1.2 9.7 3.8 4.4 2.2 4.2 6.9 1.7 4.7 0.5 3.7 0.0 4.9 2.3 7.4 1.6 0.0 4.9 6.6 8.3 6.9 7.8 8.8 2.8 1.1 7.0 4.3 8.2 9.5 7.3 1.0 4.6

YEAR HIGH

YEAR LOW

PROPERTIES 1.011 0.693 1.157 0.760 0.507 0.354 0.295 0.155 0.680 0.540 0.770 0.480 0.909 0.721 1.420 0.900 2.439 1.590 2.648 1.434 2.634 1.939 1.080 0.430 2.261 1.380 0.375 0.210 2.100 1.170 1.520 0.710 2.950 1.750 1.000 0.655 0.626 0.445 0.969 0.710 0.502 0.332 0.665 0.425 1.150 0.860 1.459 1.005 0.750 0.430 2.097 1.589 2.890 1.850 0.668 0.455 1.313 0.950 2.884 2.260 2.350 1.735 0.480 0.315 1.370 0.745 0.340 0.185 0.080 0.040 1.237 0.850 2.273 1.200 0.548 0.324 1.548 1.161 1.516 1.179 0.390 0.230 1.163 0.788 1.692 1.240 0.992 0.607 2.692 2.032 1.405 1.032 0.670 0.495 0.930 0.555 0.440 0.275 0.294 0.190 2.996 1.842 0.457 0.286 0.260 0.145 1.482 0.775 1.630 0.905 0.390 0.265 3.342 1.950 2.980 1.314 2.029 1.500 2.051 1.374 0.580 0.280 1.508 1.280 2.411 1.679 0.320 0.195 1.730 0.715 1.201 0.625 1.016 0.855 0.765 0.450 3.308 2.740 0.205 0.140 1.126 0.785 6.000 4.500 3.462 2.800 1.189 0.810 3.469 2.890 0.845 0.690 0.339 0.225 8.648 6.000 0.090 0.050 1.781 1.133 0.195 0.105 0.760 0.320 0.119 0.045 1.993 1.419 1.170 0.789 1.401 0.755 2.200 1.680 1.619 1.113 1.764 0.756 2.100 1.535 0.815 0.595 0.910 0.595 MINING 1.440 1.140 PLANTATIONS 1.810 1.000 17.971 16.560 9.500 7.612 1.600 1.074 0.830 0.685 9.141 7.530 0.595 0.380 8.194 6.910 2.780 1.166 11.560 8.494 1.940 1.050 1.370 0.886 1.200 0.790 2.573 1.922 3.800 2.990 0.745 0.605 0.741 0.545 4.990 3.652 24.780 19.357 3.639 2.891 3.380 2.146 0.645 0.345 3.930 2.410 2.000 1.410 1.860 1.500 1.028 0.800 2.850 1.930 5.033 3.972 0.350 0.200 1.220 0.800 0.675 0.465 4.080 3.442 3.329 2.653 0.825 0.550 5.511 3.610 2.330 1.700 0.873 0.510 1.610 1.090 1.680 1.150 2.350 1.730 6.312 5.280 27.680 24.122 HOTELS 0.896 0.515 1.460 0.840 0.360 0.205 6.966 5.300 TECHNOLOGY 0.950 0.690 0.475 0.195 0.250 0.115 0.430 0.225 0.255 0.130 0.240 0.175 0.340 0.180 1.708 1.160 0.990 0.523 2.100 1.173 1.280 0.710 0.320 0.185 0.319 0.232 6.910 4.648 0.743 0.554 3.960 2.201 0.240 0.100 0.890 0.566 5.950 2.636 0.250 0.060 10.700 5.564

DAY HIGH

DAY LOW

CODE

COUNTER

0.890 0.770 0.430 0.195 — — 0.800 0.950 — — 2.170 0.640 1.590 0.240 1.300 — 1.980 — 0.555 0.865 0.415 0.465 — 1.150 — 1.820 2.890 0.485 1.010 2.400 2.110 0.370 0.810 — 0.055 1.000 1.340 0.360 — 1.370 0.275 1.060 1.340 0.765 2.390 — 0.530 0.685 0.285 — 2.340 0.380 0.235 1.180 0.925 0.355 2.560 2.500 1.620 1.560 0.305 1.360 1.750 0.235 1.280 0.715 0.910 0.515 2.900 — — 5.450 3.000 0.845 3.010 0.725 0.240 6.400 0.055 1.360 0.115 0.335 0.050 1.500 1.150 1.020 2.190 1.190 — 1.940 0.630 0.695

0.865 0.770 0.430 0.175 — — 0.800 0.950 — — 2.120 0.620 1.570 0.235 1.280 — 1.980 — 0.505 0.855 0.385 0.445 — 1.130 — 1.800 2.880 0.470 0.980 2.360 2.050 0.365 0.785 — 0.055 0.965 1.300 0.355 — 1.340 0.275 1.050 1.300 0.750 2.390 — 0.525 0.685 0.280 — 2.270 0.365 0.235 1.130 0.920 0.330 2.510 2.500 1.600 1.540 0.290 1.360 1.740 0.225 1.260 0.695 0.910 0.505 2.880 — — 5.410 2.930 0.825 2.960 0.715 0.235 6.400 0.050 1.350 0.110 0.320 0.050 1.490 1.080 0.985 2.100 1.150 — 1.850 0.620 0.680

1007 5959 1007PA 4057 6602 9814 3239 5738 6718 5049 5355 3484 3417 3557 8206 6076 8613 6815 6041 5020 9962 1147 2968 1503 7010 5062 5018 4251 5084 1597 5249 5175 1589 6769 3115 7323 5038 3174 8494 5789 3573 7617 8583 6181 5236 5182 5040 1694 8141 8141PA 6114 8893 6548 1651 9539 3913 5073 5827 5053 1724 6912 1945 5075 2208 4596 5207 2224 4286 6017 4375 5213 1783 8664 3743 5211 1538 5158 2305 2259 5191 2429 7889 7079 5239 5401 5148 5200 2976 7003 3158 2577 2577

AMPROP A&M AMPROP-PA ASIAPAC BCB BERTAM BJASSET CHHB CRESNDO CVIEW DAIMAN DBHD E&O ECOFIRS ECOWLD ENCORP ENRA EUPE FARLIM GLOMAC GMUTUAL GOB GPLUS GUOCO HOOVER HUAYANG HUNZPTY IBHD IBRACO IGB IOIPG IVORY IWCITY JKGLAND KBUNAI KEN KSL L&G LBICAP LBS LIENHOE MAGNA MAHSING MALTON MATRIX MCT MEDAINC MENANG MJPERAK MJPERAK-PA MKH MKLAND MPCORP MRCB MUH MUIPROP NAIM OIB OSK PARAMON PASDEC PJDEV PLENITU PTGTIN SAPRES SBCCORP SDRED SEAL SHL SMI SNTORIA SPB SPSETIA SUNSURIA SUNWAY SYMLIFE TAGB TAHPS TALAMT TAMBUN TANCO THRIVEN TIGER TITIJYA TROP UEMS UOADEV WINGTM Y&G YNHPROP YTLLAND YTLLAND

1.210

1.210

2186

KUCHAI

1.210

0.010

0.2

1.210



0.70

149.7

1.610 17.540 — 1.520 0.750 — 0.470 — 1.580 10.820 1.500 1.310 0.900 2.450 3.730 0.685 0.620 4.830 24.480 3.110 3.090 0.595 3.850 1.500 — 0.910 — 4.020 0.290 1.020 0.540 4.040 3.050 0.575 — 1.800 0.670 1.160 1.390 1.950 6.100 25.500

1.560 17.460 — 1.490 0.735 — 0.455 — 1.550 10.580 1.480 1.300 0.900 2.450 3.620 0.685 0.610 4.650 23.960 3.110 3.050 0.575 3.820 1.410 — 0.900 — 4.020 0.245 1.020 0.535 3.900 3.050 0.565 — 1.750 0.655 1.160 1.350 1.900 6.060 25.500

7054 1899 5069 5254 8982 1929 3948 5029 5222 2291 7382 2135 7501 5138 2216 2607 6262 1961 2445 2453 5027 1996 2003 6572 4936 5026 5047 2038 1902 9695 5113 2542 2569 4316 5126 5135 2054 5112 5251 9059 2593 2089

AASIA BKAWAN BLDPLNT BPLANT CEPAT CHINTEK DUTALND FAREAST FGV GENP GLBHD GOPENG HARNLEN HSPLANT IJMPLNT INCKEN INNO IOICORP KLK KLUANG KMLOONG KRETAM KULIM KWANTAS MALPAC MHC NPC NSOP PINEPAC PLS RSAWIT RVIEW SBAGAN SHCHAN SOP SWKPLNT TDM THPLANT TMAKMUR TSH UMCCA UTDPLT

1.600 17.500 9.200 1.520 0.750 7.780 0.465 7.880 1.570 10.800 1.480 1.310 0.900 2.450 3.730 0.685 0.620 4.770 24.000 3.110 3.090 0.580 3.840 1.410 1.610 0.910 2.290 4.020 0.270 1.020 0.535 3.980 3.050 0.565 4.300 1.800 0.655 1.160 1.360 1.900 6.060 25.500

UNCH -0.020 — UNCH UNCH — -0.005 — 0.010 -0.020 0.020 UNCH UNCH -0.010 0.110 -0.015 UNCH -0.030 UNCH 0.060 UNCH -0.005 UNCH -0.090 — UNCH — -0.030 0.035 0.020 -0.005 0.030 0.050 UNCH — -0.020 -0.005 UNCH -0.010 -0.030 -0.040 UNCH

44.4 5.9 — 212.2 24.5 — 224.1 — 2091.4 526.7 101.8 23 30 20 81.5 0.5 73.1 5065 1127.6 8 5.3 2161.1 600.2 14 — 36.5 — 2 13.1 4 149 430.8 3 15 — 27.5 813.8 13.5 770 230.8 7 0.9

1.574 17.520 — 1.511 0.749 — 0.462 — 1.559 10.793 1.488 1.305 0.900 2.450 3.685 0.685 0.610 4.723 24.021 3.110 3.082 0.584 3.833 1.441 — 0.905 — 4.020 0.268 1.020 0.540 4.038 3.050 0.570 — 1.775 0.662 1.160 1.372 1.918 6.076 25.500

— 14.72 42.26 30.89 15.09 23.33 6.77 15.63 — 43.94 — 32.27 — 20.55 58.74 — 15.31 — 17.61 — 12.80 — 34.47 — — 17.70 — — — — — 32.15 — — 35.92 23.62 25.99 36.14 7.41 — 27.84 18.16

1.25 2.86 0.43 — 2.67 2.06 — 3.81 3.82 0.60 0.68 2.29 8.89 3.27 1.61 1.59 — 1.68 1.88 0.32 4.21 — 2.47 3.55 — 2.20 0.44 1.49 — — — 1.51 0.66 — 1.16 4.17 2.29 1.72 11.03 1.32 2.64 1.57

192.0 7,629.1 860.2 2,432.0 238.8 710.8 393.4 1,114.2 5,727.6 8,467.5 329.9 234.9 166.9 1,960.0 3,284.6 288.2 296.4 30,822.9 25,620.1 196.5 963.5 1,087.5 5,309.6 439.5 120.8 178.9 274.8 282.2 40.4 333.2 758.9 258.1 202.3 65.0 1,897.7 504.0 970.5 1,025.3 541.5 2,556.3 1,267.9 5,307.4

— 0.975 0.310 5.650

— 0.950 0.300 5.640

5592 1643 1287 5517

GCE LANDMRK PMHLDG SHANG

0.650 0.950 0.310 5.640

— -0.025 0.005 0.090

— 52.6 45 36

— — 0.954 139.71 0.310 3100 5.646 26.67

3.08 — — 2.48

128.1 456.8 287.9 2,481.6

0.800 0.265 0.125 0.355 0.165 0.180 0.230 1.590 0.910 1.940 0.910 0.260 — 5.510 — 3.340 0.140 0.730 4.500 0.175 7.950

0.720 0.260 0.120 0.350 0.160 0.175 0.225 1.560 0.900 1.900 0.860 0.250 — 5.400 — 3.210 0.130 0.715 4.450 0.170 7.710

7031 5195 0051 7204 8338 0029 4456 5162 0065 0090 0021 0082 0056 7022 5028 0166 9393 5161 9334 0143 3867

AMTEL CENSOF CUSCAPI D&O DATAPRP DIGISTA DNEX ECS EFORCE ELSOFT GHLSYS GPACKET GRANFLO GTRONIC HTPADU INARI ITRONIC JCY KESM KEYASIC MPI

0.780 0.260 0.120 0.350 0.165 0.175 0.230 1.560 0.905 1.940 0.890 0.255 0.255 5.500 0.610 3.300 0.140 0.720 4.470 0.170 7.780

0.050 -0.005 UNCH UNCH UNCH -0.010 UNCH -0.020 -0.005 0.020 -0.015 -0.005 — 0.120 — 0.020 0.015 UNCH UNCH 0.005 -0.170

15 621.1 72.7 583 476.6 289 631.6 84.7 427.6 18.9 1039.6 1718.7 — 648.4 — 2659.1 6.5 688.8 15.8 884.9 692

0.763 0.260 0.121 0.354 0.164 0.177 0.229 1.571 0.905 1.916 0.894 0.256 — 5.444 — 3.285 0.138 0.718 4.470 0.172 7.775

— — — — — — — 3.85 3.87 3.35 — — 3.92 1.64 3.28 2.35 — 9.38 0.67 — 2.70

38.4 130.4 52.3 345.6 63.2 81.1 178.3 280.8 187.1 351.4 578.4 176.1 123.2 1,550.1 61.7 3,143.8 14.4 1,494.7 192.3 140.8 1,632.9

* Volume Weighted Average Price

CLOSING (RM)

+/– (RM)

VOL (‘000)

0.880 0.770 0.430 0.180 0.570 0.500 0.800 0.950 1.700 1.530 2.170 0.630 1.580 0.240 1.300 0.770 1.980 0.775 0.510 0.865 0.395 0.460 1.050 1.140 0.530 1.810 2.880 0.480 1.010 2.400 2.070 0.370 0.795 0.190 0.055 0.980 1.300 0.360 1.340 1.350 0.275 1.060 1.310 0.765 2.390 1.240 0.525 0.685 0.280 0.190 2.280 0.370 0.235 1.130 0.920 0.330 2.560 2.500 1.600 1.540 0.305 1.360 1.740 0.235 1.280 0.700 0.910 0.510 2.900 0.145 0.820 5.410 3.000 0.845 3.010 0.720 0.240 6.400 0.055 1.360 0.110 0.320 0.050 1.500 1.130 1.010 2.100 1.150 1.120 1.940 0.630 0.680

0.010 -0.010 UNCH -0.015 — — UNCH UNCH — — 0.020 0.005 0.010 UNCH 0.020 — -0.120 — 0.030 UNCH -0.010 UNCH — 0.010 — UNCH UNCH -0.010 -0.020 0.020 0.010 -0.005 -0.005 — UNCH -0.040 -0.020 UNCH — UNCH -0.005 UNCH 0.010 -0.010 UNCH — -0.005 UNCH -0.010 — 0.030 UNCH UNCH -0.030 -0.050 -0.015 UNCH UNCH -0.010 UNCH 0.005 0.010 -0.040 UNCH UNCH -0.010 0.010 0.005 0.040 — — -0.040 0.110 0.005 UNCH 0.010 0.005 -0.200 0.005 0.010 -0.005 -0.015 0.005 -0.030 0.050 0.010 UNCH -0.040 — 0.050 0.005 -0.020

79.3 9.3 7.3 6299.8 — — 5 5.2 — — 21.6 94.9 389.4 1502 539.6 — 0.5 — 585.4 18 65.6 1980.6 — 19 — 125.3 22.2 571.4 53 80.3 1521.3 111.6 470.8 — 1018.2 6.1 483.9 262.5 — 887.6 200 192 881.7 127.5 36.5 — 340 1.4 39.1 — 345.5 244.9 9 1949.5 9.3 637.5 156.4 6.6 331.7 165.3 10.6 5 41 152.4 23.2 79 5 113.2 24.2 — — 18.2 583.3 227.3 604.9 79.6 152.5 4.2 313.8 72.7 103 117.1 1632.1 92.1 2055.3 7421.6 1516.7 214.5 — 1442.9 170.9 140

# PE is calculated based on latest 12 months reported Earnings Per Share

VWAP* (RM)

PE# (X)

DY (%)

MKT CAP (MIL)

0.878 6.21 0.770 10.56 0.430 — 0.180 0.49 — 7.68 — 6.69 0.800 11.54 0.950 — — 8.15 — 7.23 2.161 14.32 0.631 — 1.581 12.38 0.235 9.06 1.287 51.38 — 25.67 1.980 38.45 — 12.98 0.538 28.65 0.865 6.79 0.391 5.76 0.452 2.42 — 7.89 1.134 3.88 — — 1.809 4.03 2.880 30.77 0.476 14.04 0.997 18.20 2.394 15.10 2.081 8.23 0.368 9.14 0.792 35.65 — 8.76 0.055 — 0.996 6.71 1.307 3.44 0.358 3.76 — 4.88 1.350 9.23 0.275 — 1.055 2.23 1.316 8.95 0.756 9.71 2.390 6.23 — 21.57 0.530 — 0.685 5.56 0.282 — — — 2.302 11.00 0.371 9.07 0.235 — 1.149 7.07 0.925 4.75 0.349 — 2.522 5.32 2.500 11.72 1.609 3.41 1.550 10.34 0.290 — 1.360 8.31 1.746 3.61 0.228 — 1.261 60.38 0.700 11.08 0.910 5.20 0.508 — 2.900 6.73 — — — 11.60 5.435 3.13 2.974 10.83 0.837 16.34 2.999 6.39 0.720 14.75 0.237 104.35 6.400 16.97 0.050 — 1.350 5.91 0.115 — 0.324 — 0.050 125.00 1.493 6.76 1.118 4.10 1.001 10.03 2.139 7.78 1.161 8.82 — 6.36 1.903 58.61 0.624 17.80 0.952 27.31

3.41 1.95 4.65 1.67 — — 1.25 — 4.12 13.07 2.30 — — — — — — 1.94 9.80 4.91 5.06 — — 1.75 — 7.18 — 3.15 3.47 4.17 2.90 — — 1.05 — 3.06 5.38 5.56 3.73 2.41 — 4.72 4.96 3.92 6.02 1.61 — — — 2.63 3.07 8.11 — 2.21 — — 1.37 3.00 4.69 4.87 — 3.68 2.59 — 1.95 2.29 3.30 — 8.62 — 2.44 2.22 3.23 — 3.65 6.94 4.17 5.00 — 7.13 — — — 3.00 6.19 2.97 6.19 2.61 7.81 — — —

528.2 281.1 127.2 178.7 235.1 103.4 890.4 261.9 476.8 153.0 460.5 194.9 1,990.5 175.2 3,073.5 214.6 269.7 99.2 71.6 629.6 148.4 209.2 154.2 798.5 21.2 477.8 718.8 475.6 501.4 3,275.5 9,156.9 164.8 532.4 144.1 317.7 187.9 1,312.3 393.2 100.8 744.4 99.5 352.9 3,156.3 343.0 1,343.7 1,655.1 258.6 183.0 55.6 17.2 956.3 446.7 67.6 2,018.8 51.9 252.1 640.0 362.2 2,244.6 650.3 62.8 718.7 663.9 81.3 178.7 164.4 387.8 112.9 702.2 30.4 397.0 1,859.0 7,885.2 621.5 5,421.5 223.2 1,277.2 479.1 232.1 577.1 36.8 120.5 69.5 540.0 1,635.6 4,582.8 3,193.7 559.8 223.3 856.4 531.9 574.2

46.71 13.68 — 40.70 — — 15.33 8.83 23.88 14.85 75.42 — 11.33 21.82 7.72 17.53 — 6.67 8.60 — 10.24

YEAR HIGH

YEAR LOW

DAY HIGH

DAY LOW

1.700 0.960 — — 0.495 0.360 0.395 0.385 0.765 0.446 0.525 0.515 0.360 0.280 0.305 0.295 0.915 0.470 0.650 0.635 0.480 0.235 — — 0.135 0.035 0.040 0.040 2.566 1.526 2.260 2.230 3.782 2.684 3.310 3.230 0.960 0.640 0.720 0.695 INFRASTRUCTURE PROJECT COMPANIES 6.199 4.712 5.010 4.980 5.330 3.601 5.050 5.020 1.950 1.020 1.080 1.020 0.585 0.335 0.455 0.420 8.000 4.787 7.300 7.270 1.600 1.400 1.470 1.450 CLOSED-END FUNDS 2.400 2.100 2.260 2.260 EXCHANGE TRADED FUNDS 1.079 1.035 — — 1.890 1.550 — — 1.575 1.015 — — 1.890 1.580 1.705 1.705 1.010 0.900 — — 1.015 0.850 0.888 0.883 1.190 0.990 1.125 1.115 1.075 0.940 1.025 1.025 REITS 1.123 0.875 1.020 1.010 1.490 1.243 1.490 1.490 1.112 0.881 0.940 0.940 0.899 0.705 0.735 0.730 0.900 0.763 0.900 0.885 1.116 0.974 1.080 1.070 1.756 1.517 1.560 1.540 1.500 1.206 1.500 1.480 1.520 1.348 1.520 1.510 1.510 1.199 1.500 1.480 7.300 6.800 7.200 7.040 1.143 0.954 1.130 1.120 1.730 1.310 1.710 1.650 1.640 1.401 1.580 1.560 1.220 1.045 1.200 1.200 1.640 1.397 1.620 1.610 1.090 0.935 1.080 1.070 SPAC 0.705 0.650 0.690 0.690 0.655 0.595 0.650 0.650 0.475 0.415 0.465 0.460

CODE

COUNTER

CLOSING (RM)

+/– (RM)

VOL (‘000)

VWAP* (RM)

PE# (X)

DY (%)

MKT CAP (MIL)

5011 0083 9008 0041 7160 9075 0118 5005 0097 0008

MSNIAGA NOTION OMESTI PANPAGE PENTA THETA TRIVE UNISEM VITROX WILLOW

1.000 0.390 0.515 0.300 0.640 0.300 0.040 2.240 3.290 0.715

— 0.005 UNCH 0.005 -0.010 — UNCH 0.010 0.060 UNCH

— 306.4 386.5 674.5 701.6 — 537.9 1855.5 320.2 209.3

— 0.390 0.521 0.300 0.638 — 0.040 2.245 3.296 0.708

— — — — 6.84 — — 13.40 15.72 10.47

— — — — — — — 3.57 0.61 2.80

60.4 105.5 200.5 72.4 87.8 32.2 43.9 1,643.8 768.9 177.3

6947 6645 6807 5078 5031 6742

DIGI LITRAK PUNCAK SILKHLD TIMECOM YTLPOWR

5.000 5.040 1.030 0.425 7.280 1.470

0.030 0.020 -0.060 -0.005 UNCH 0.010

7893.6 241.2 2026.2 923.5 528.8 1979.2

4.998 5.041 1.043 0.444 7.281 1.462

22.57 17.24 — — 8.68 11.98

4.40 4.96 — — 0.92 6.80

38,875.0 2,631.4 462.8 298.2 4,190.4 11,909.3

5108

ICAP

2.260

0.010

19.7

2.260





316.4

0800EA 0822EA 0823EA 0820EA 0826EA 0825EA 0821EA 0824EA

ABFMY1 CIMBA40 CIMBC50 FBMKLCI-EA METFAPA METFSID MYETFDJ MYETFID

1.075 1.620 1.085 1.705 0.951 0.888 1.115 1.025

— — — 0.020 — 0.011 -0.005 0.027

— — — 6.4 — 35 40 30.1

— — — 1.705 — 0.886 1.120 1.025

— — — — — — — —

5.28 3.86 — 1.47 — 2.42 2.13 3.07

1,360.3 2.2 13.4 2.9 18.1 17.8 280.4 22.1

4952 5116 5269 5120 5127 5130 5106 5180 5121 5227 5235SS 5123 5212 5176 5111 5110 5109

AHP ALAQAR ALSREIT AMFIRST ARREIT ATRIUM AXREIT CMMT HEKTAR IGBREIT KLCC MQREIT PAVREIT SUNREIT TWRREIT UOAREIT YTLREIT

1.010 1.490 0.940 0.730 0.890 1.080 1.540 1.500 1.510 1.500 7.100 1.120 1.650 1.560 1.200 1.620 1.070

UNCH UNCH UNCH UNCH 0.005 0.010 -0.020 0.010 0.010 0.010 -0.050 UNCH -0.070 -0.010 UNCH 0.010 -0.010

15 110 31.8 106 97.5 31.7 39.5 702.3 46 3311.2 249.7 151.2 60.2 253.8 57 2.3 350.4

1.019 1.490 0.940 0.730 0.889 1.079 1.548 1.488 1.511 1.493 7.121 1.122 1.669 1.562 1.200 1.618 1.072

8.21 14.29 — 17.26 5.13 8.52 17.48 12.43 13.53 20.38 11.33 10.63 17.63 8.31 13.06 6.21 39.78

6.93 5.17 1.28 6.12 7.04 7.64 5.45 5.73 6.95 5.38 4.88 3.71 4.99 5.69 5.78 6.80 7.28

101.0 1,085.1 545.2 501.1 510.2 131.5 1,693.7 3,037.2 605.0 5,216.5 12,817.9 740.7 4,982.7 4,590.6 336.6 685.1 1,417.1

CLIQ REACH SONA

0.690 0.650 0.460

UNCH UNCH UNCH

686.4 28.2 4292.5

0.690 0.650 0.464

— — —

— — —

435.3 830.6 648.9

CLOSING (RM)

+/– (RM)

VOL (‘000)

VWAP* (RM)

PE# (X)

DY (%)

MKT CAP (MIL)

2930.2 120 326.2 200

0.330 — 0.109 22.92 0.322 160.00 0.058 1.76

— — 1.44 1.67

167.5 66.5 153.3 140.9

5234 5256 5241

Ace Market YEAR HIGH

YEAR LOW

DAY HIGH

CONSUMER PRODUCTS 0.480 0.225 0.335 0.345 0.095 0.110 0.429 0.280 0.325 0.129 0.050 0.060 INDUSTRIAL PRODUCTS 0.345 0.200 0.220 0.150 0.060 0.070 0.610 0.315 0.500 0.320 0.110 0.125 0.605 0.235 0.510 0.070 0.040 0.050 0.880 0.435 0.460 0.165 0.070 0.080 0.435 0.110 0.150 0.165 0.085 0.100 0.245 0.120 0.145 0.180 0.065 0.080 0.500 0.269 0.420 0.180 0.105 0.130 0.110 0.045 0.055 0.170 0.085 0.105 0.250 0.120 — 0.415 0.135 0.145 0.270 0.160 0.190 TECHNOLOGY 0.615 0.355 0.430 0.270 0.120 — 1.600 0.300 0.470 0.015 0.005 — 1.310 0.815 0.880 0.730 0.165 0.610 0.120 0.005 — 0.150 0.050 0.070 0.145 0.050 0.065 0.150 0.060 0.095 0.430 0.190 0.300 0.095 0.045 — 0.315 0.135 0.175 0.070 0.035 — 0.160 0.085 0.095 0.155 0.065 0.075 1.854 0.460 0.820 0.150 0.055 0.060 0.345 0.165 0.190 0.860 0.526 0.690 0.565 0.145 0.455 0.670 0.180 0.300 0.080 0.040 0.065 0.415 0.100 0.160 0.215 0.105 — 0.160 0.050 — 0.970 0.460 0.630 1.950 0.510 1.870 0.600 0.287 0.545 0.115 0.060 — 0.095 0.055 0.065 0.877 0.465 0.475 0.380 0.175 0.240 0.365 0.180 0.235 0.265 0.075 — 1.070 0.606 0.900 0.090 0.025 0.045 0.135 0.050 0.065 0.250 0.090 0.095 0.250 0.100 0.215 1.307 0.536 0.745 0.339 0.275 0.290 0.060 0.030 — 0.430 0.150 0.190 0.180 0.075 0.110 0.755 0.325 0.590 0.165 0.030 0.040 0.644 0.307 0.410 0.160 0.075 0.075 0.585 0.170 0.220 0.175 0.065 0.095 0.450 0.238 0.365 0.200 0.090 0.130 0.397 0.151 0.185 0.160 0.100 0.115 0.425 0.140 0.180 0.340 0.075 0.235 0.460 0.065 0.070 0.425 0.045 — 0.355 0.110 — 0.563 0.451 0.525 TRADING SERVICES 0.280 0.150 — 0.200 0.095 0.100 0.130 0.045 0.055 0.320 0.196 — 0.320 0.205 0.230 0.600 0.350 0.470 0.575 0.280 0.575 0.475 0.260 0.380 0.250 0.160 0.250 0.240 0.140 0.165 0.260 0.120 0.190 0.400 0.280 — 0.330 0.170 0.260 0.045 0.005 0.005 0.290 0.130 0.270 0.900 0.500 0.525 0.970 0.480 — 2.670 1.384 1.850 0.303 0.195 0.220 0.465 0.325 — 0.055 0.030 0.040 1.490 0.450 1.090 0.235 0.100 0.135 0.705 0.110 0.155 FINANCE 0.600 0.390 0.475

DAY LOW

CODE

COUNTER

0.325 0.105 0.320 0.055

0179 0170 0148 0095

BIOHLDG KANGER SUNZEN XINGHE

0.335 0.110 0.320 0.060

0.010 Unch -0.010 Unch

0.205 0.070 0.485 0.110 0.495 0.045 0.445 0.080 0.150 0.095 0.120 0.080 0.415 0.130 0.045 0.105 — 0.135 0.190

0105 0072 0163 0102 0100 0109 0175 0160 0162 0024 0025 0070 0049 0038 0133 0001 0028 0055 0084

ASIAPLY AT CAREPLS CONNECT ESCERAM FLONIC HHGROUP HHHCORP IJACOBS JAG LNGRES MQTECH OCNCASH PTB SANICHI SCOMNET SCOPE SERSOL TECFAST

0.205 0.070 0.490 0.120 0.505 0.050 0.450 0.080 0.150 0.095 0.145 0.080 0.415 0.130 0.050 0.105 0.140 0.135 0.190

Unch 4638.4 Unch 1010.7 -0.005 205.5 0.005 3051.3 0.005 911.2 0.005 4575.1 -0.005 404.1 -0.005 10.1 Unch 96 -0.005 11558.2 -0.005 1310 Unch 807 Unch 600.7 Unch 70 0.005 23414.3 -0.005 126 — — -0.010 634 Unch 178.4

0.214 0.070 0.493 0.117 0.503 0.049 0.452 0.080 0.150 0.098 0.132 0.080 0.417 0.130 0.050 0.105 — 0.139 0.190

28.87 — 35.25 16.22 15.17 — 10.09 — — — — — 10.40 14.29 14.29 21.00 — — 18.27

1.51 — 0.35 — — — 0.73 — — 5.26 — — 1.69 — — — — — —

54.1 30.3 186.2 26.0 103.8 40.0 138.9 26.7 20.4 108.7 35.1 22.3 92.5 19.6 57.2 25.5 77.8 29.1 32.5

0.420 — 0.450 — 0.870 0.585 — 0.060 0.060 0.095 0.285 — 0.165 — 0.095 0.070 0.770 0.055 0.180 0.675 0.450 0.280 0.055 0.160 — — 0.630 1.840 0.530 — 0.060 0.465 0.240 0.225 — 0.890 0.040 0.060 0.090 0.195 0.735 0.285 — 0.185 0.085 0.550 0.040 0.405 0.075 0.215 0.090 0.355 0.120 0.180 0.115 0.180 0.225 0.065 — — 0.520

0181 0119 0068 0039 0098 0079 0022 0152 0131 0154 0107 0116 0104 0045 0074 0174 0023 0094 0010 0146 0127 0111 0036 0176 0017 0075 0155 0126 0112 0085 0034 0113 0103 0156 0092 0108 0020 0096 0026 0018 0035 0040 0005 0123 0007 0106 0135 0178 0060 0117 0169 0093 0129 0050 0132 0120 0069 0066 0141 0086 0009

AEMULUS APPASIA ASDION ASIAEP BAHVEST CWORKS CYBERT DGB DGSB EAH EDUSPEC FOCUS GENETEC GNB GOCEAN IDMENSN IFCAMSC INIX IRIS JFTECH JHM K1 KGROUP KRONO M3TECH MEXTER MGRC MICROLN MIKROMB MLAB MMAG MMSV MNC MPAY MTOUCHE N2N NETX NEXGRAM NOVAMSC OMEDIA OPCOM OPENSYS PALETTE PRIVA PUC REXIT SCN SEDANIA SKH SMRT SMTRACK SOLUTN SRIDGE SYSTECH TDEX VIS VIVOCOM VSOLAR WINTONI YGL YTLE

0.430 0.125 0.460 0.010 0.880 0.605 0.005 0.065 0.060 0.095 0.300 0.080 0.175 0.040 0.095 0.075 0.775 0.060 0.180 0.675 0.455 0.280 0.065 0.160 0.110 0.055 0.630 1.850 0.530 0.065 0.060 0.470 0.240 0.225 0.115 0.900 0.045 0.065 0.090 0.215 0.740 0.285 0.040 0.185 0.090 0.555 0.040 0.410 0.075 0.220 0.095 0.360 0.125 0.185 0.115 0.180 0.230 0.070 0.060 0.130 0.520

Unch — 0.020 — 0.010 0.015 — 0.010 -0.005 -0.005 0.005 — 0.010 — Unch 0.005 -0.030 0.005 -0.010 -0.015 -0.010 -0.020 0.005 Unch — — Unch Unch Unch — -0.005 Unch Unch -0.005 — Unch Unch Unch Unch 0.005 -0.005 -0.005 — -0.005 -0.010 -0.025 Unch 0.005 Unch Unch 0.005 -0.005 0.005 0.005 Unch -0.010 -0.005 Unch — — Unch

0.425 16.80 — — 0.462 25.70 — — 0.874 157.14 0.601 — — 0.22 0.065 — 0.060 31.58 0.095 — 0.294 25.42 — — 0.170 5.54 — 3.25 0.095 135.71 0.070 — 0.785 13.45 0.055 21.43 0.185 — 0.683 20.64 0.452 11.82 0.287 10.98 0.061 — 0.160 16.49 — — — — 0.630 14.69 1.850 25.52 0.537 17.38 — — 0.063 — 0.470 8.39 0.240 27.59 0.229 — — — 0.893 47.62 0.045 — 0.065 13.54 0.092 128.57 0.203 — 0.740 13.58 0.285 11.83 — — 0.190 18.32 0.101 16.98 0.568 16.13 0.040 — 0.408 18.64 0.075 — 0.215 — 0.092 — 0.361 12.46 0.123 — 0.180 28.91 0.115 — 0.180 — 0.231 74.19 0.069 — — — — — 0.520 19.85

— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — 1.29 — — 1.48 — 1.79 — — — — — 1.62 1.89 — — 4.26 — — — 1.11 — — — — 2.70 2.63 — 1.35 — 3.60 — — — — — 2.78 — 3.24 — — — — — — 7.69

188.7 35.1 53.5 8.1 379.5 73.2 0.5 31.8 81.4 141.6 254.0 56.5 61.6 11.6 25.0 37.1 471.4 25.0 367.6 85.1 56.0 132.3 41.5 37.9 21.7 10.8 59.3 281.5 162.0 12.1 57.2 76.6 22.7 159.9 26.6 418.1 28.1 122.4 49.6 137.7 119.3 84.9 11.6 103.3 95.9 105.1 8.0 82.0 41.6 57.3 26.9 71.9 15.1 58.7 43.2 19.9 569.3 21.2 30.8 25.2 702.0

— 0.100 0.050 — 0.230 0.465 0.500 0.365 0.200 0.165 0.185 — 0.255 0.005 0.265 0.510 — 1.850 0.220 — 0.035 1.090 0.135 0.140

0122 0048 0150 0011 0157 0081 0147 0180 0167 0153 0177 0006 0171 0110 0080 0032 0173 0158 0161 0137 0140 0089 0145 0165

AIM ANCOMLB ASIABIO BTECH FOCUSP IDEAL INNITY KTC MCLEAN OVERSEA PASUKGB PINEAPP PLABS RA RAYA REDTONE REV SCC SCH STEMLFE STERPRO TEXCYCL TFP XOX

0.200 0.100 0.050 0.250 0.230 0.470 0.575 0.370 0.225 0.165 0.185 0.310 0.260 0.005 0.270 0.525 0.530 1.850 0.220 0.465 0.035 1.090 0.135 0.150

— — Unch 97.8 -0.005 916.6 — — -0.005 0.5 0.005 38 0.135 6.3 Unch 2402.2 0.025 3800.1 Unch 100 Unch 981.9 — — Unch 502 Unch 110.8 -0.005 188.6 0.010 397.5 — — Unch 0.6 -0.005 1178.5 — — Unch 113.5 -0.010 10 0.010 8 0.005 36370.4

— 0.100 0.052 — 0.230 0.469 0.502 0.372 0.225 0.165 0.185 — 0.258 0.005 0.269 0.519 — 1.850 0.220 — 0.035 1.090 0.135 0.149

48.78 — — 16.03 42.59 15.72 41.07 22.42 — — — — 11.66 — — 55.85 19.92 12.98 28.21 — — 32.93 — 14.29

— — — 2.52 4.35 — — — — 1.82 — — 2.69 — — 0.38 — 2.70 6.82 6.45 — 0.46 — —

53.2 47.3 43.3 63.0 38.0 87.8 79.6 189.2 40.2 40.4 54.6 15.0 53.8 4.8 38.7 397.6 71.4 79.1 90.7 115.1 34.6 186.2 27.7 83.5

0.455

0053

OSKVI

0.475

0.456



4.21

93.9

0.010

917.7 — 907.2 — 25.6 2520.5 — 28224.6 781.5 4342.9 460 — 14799.4 — 197 54 9260.8 3270.1 7650.9 47.1 97.8 4377.4 7289.9 299 — — 0.3 497 239.8 — 532 343.8 12 250 — 141.4 900.2 6159.2 1028.9 1012 42.8 582 — 1131.9 103116 816.6 100 45.8 11202.1 881.1 702 344.4 38 212 39 232 18674.1 325 — — 140

7

28 Markets

M ON DAY FEB RUARY 29, 2 0 16 • TH EEDGE F I N AN C I AL DAI LY

MO

B U R S A M A L AY S I A E Q U I T Y D E R I VAT I E S

Bursa Malaysia Equity Derivatives Main Market & Ace Market Warrants YEAR HIGH

YEAR LOW

DAY HIGH

DAY LOW

CODE

0.075 0.115 0.335 0.090 0.145 0.025 0.130 0.115 0.150 0.410 0.420 0.530 0.165 0.130 0.070 0.080 0.150 0.110 0.100 0.040 0.105 0.125 0.095 0.180 0.145 0.145 0.085 0.100 0.070 0.125 0.130 0.185 0.155 0.135 0.950 0.055 0.160 0.300 0.055 0.065 0.185 0.860 0.080 0.170 0.125 0.330 0.150 0.210 0.485 0.310 0.330 0.155 0.095 0.165 0.105 0.155 0.060 0.090 0.105 0.220 2.190 0.105 0.075 0.207 0.105 0.215 0.130 0.285 0.330 0.145 1.330 0.038 0.285 0.515 0.255 0.270 0.135 0.190 0.090 0.225 0.185 0.190 0.120 0.225 0.130 0.010 0.830 0.200 0.045 0.135 0.120 0.055 0.110 0.015 0.265 0.040 0.035 0.115 0.095 0.475 0.150 0.135 0.125 0.140 0.225 0.130 0.110 0.085 0.120 0.420 0.065 0.105 0.070 0.110 0.080 0.040 0.125 0.060 0.250 0.115 0.105 0.155 0.135 0.140 0.110 0.145 0.125 0.100 0.095 0.465 0.090 0.090 0.215 0.120 0.200 0.145 0.115 0.850 0.210 0.120 0.115 0.125 0.325 0.515 0.815 0.600 0.050 0.560 0.510 0.330 0.625 0.860 0.215 0.285 0.290 0.205 0.795 0.300 0.320 1.030 0.525 0.530 0.465 0.265 0.870 0.190 0.205 0.660 0.790 0.120 0.095 0.105 0.110 0.225

0.035 0.035 0.175 0.010 0.080 0.005 0.060 0.005 0.015 0.090 0.085 0.320 0.085 0.060 0.040 0.060 0.125 0.010 0.005 0.015 0.005 0.040 0.020 0.060 0.005 0.015 0.085 0.080 0.050 0.125 0.040 0.045 0.105 0.095 0.150 0.015 0.105 0.005 0.005 0.025 0.105 0.100 0.030 0.015 0.060 0.150 0.050 0.080 0.225 0.090 0.150 0.005 0.005 0.105 0.060 0.085 0.055 0.015 0.050 0.095 1.450 0.025 0.035 0.060 0.065 0.075 0.015 0.040 0.060 0.025 0.410 0.005 0.097 0.255 0.080 0.095 0.070 0.185 0.005 0.060 0.040 0.045 0.065 0.075 0.020 0.005 0.070 0.050 0.010 0.035 0.030 0.035 0.045 0.005 0.140 0.010 0.010 0.070 0.080 0.255 0.150 0.020 0.050 0.070 0.070 0.050 0.045 0.065 0.075 0.215 0.015 0.030 0.010 0.010 0.005 0.020 0.095 0.055 0.055 0.030 0.020 0.040 0.130 0.040 0.050 0.145 0.120 0.100 0.030 0.110 0.020 0.025 0.080 0.015 0.090 0.075 0.065 0.305 0.020 0.085 0.080 0.095 0.120 0.170 0.390 0.600 0.020 0.180 0.005 0.130 0.300 0.145 0.060 0.085 0.125 0.110 0.080 0.090 0.130 0.455 0.350 0.270 0.185 0.105 0.305 0.050 0.025 0.280 0.375 0.030 0.085 0.070 0.050 0.105

0.070 — — — — — 0.110 — 0.035 0.285 0.190 0.400 0.110 0.080 — 0.070 — 0.040 — — 0.055 0.055 0.025 — — — — — — — 0.060 — — — 0.205 0.025 0.120 — — — — — — 0.030 — — 0.060 0.145 0.280 0.150 — — — — — — — 0.030 0.095 0.140 — — — 0.070 0.075 0.120 — — 0.110 0.040 1.170 0.005 0.190 0.370 0.085 0.115 0.105 — 0.005 0.095 0.050 0.050 — — — — 0.070 0.060 0.020 — — — 0.090 — 0.165 0.020 — — — 0.385 — — 0.050 — 0.105 0.050 — 0.070 — 0.270 0.035 0.060 — 0.015 — — 0.095 — 0.135 — 0.030 — — 0.070 0.095 — — — — 0.175 — 0.045 0.160 0.020 — — — 0.375 — — — — 0.175 0.430 0.640 — 0.040 — — 0.200 0.410 0.560 0.170 0.205 — 0.170 — — 0.205 — — — — — — 0.070 0.030 — 0.430 — — — 0.065 —

0.060 — — — — — 0.100 — 0.030 0.255 0.150 0.360 0.105 0.080 — 0.060 — 0.040 — — 0.050 0.055 0.020 — — — — — — — 0.060 — — — 0.175 0.025 0.110 — — — — — — 0.020 — — 0.060 0.140 0.270 0.130 — — — — — — — 0.025 0.095 0.140 — — — 0.070 0.075 0.110 — — 0.110 0.040 1.100 0.005 0.180 0.360 0.085 0.100 0.100 — 0.005 0.090 0.045 0.045 — — — — 0.070 0.055 0.020 — — — 0.085 — 0.150 0.015 — — — 0.370 — — 0.050 — 0.105 0.050 — 0.070 — 0.265 0.035 0.055 — 0.010 — — 0.095 — 0.125 — 0.025 — — 0.070 0.090 — — — — 0.170 — 0.045 0.115 0.020 — — — 0.370 — — — — 0.170 0.420 0.595 — 0.040 — — 0.200 0.385 0.525 0.155 0.200 — 0.170 — — 0.195 — — — — — — 0.070 0.025 — 0.430 — — — 0.065 —

5238WA 7086WA 7061WB 6599CE 5185CT 2488CQ 7315WB 509919 509922 509924 509925 509926 509927 509928 509929 509931 509932 5014CO 1015CV 0159WA 9342WA 9342WB 5194WA 0119WA 52813 52814 7007WB 521011 521012 521013 5210C6 5210C7 5210C8 5210C9 0068WB 0150WA 0105WA 6399CT 7070WA 7070WB 7099WB 7099WC 0072WA 6888C4 6888C5 7078WA 4162CE 7241WA 5258WA 6998WA 3239WA 5248CH 5248CI 5248CJ 5248CK 5248CL 3395C1 3395CY 3395CZ 3395WB 5196WA 6025WA 7187WA 7036WB 7036WC 9938WB 2771CK 7188WA 7188WB 1818C8 7174WA 5229WA 0163WA 7076WA 5195WA 5195WB 102310 102311 1023C7 1023C8 1023C9 2852CM 2852CN 2852CO 5071CJ 5071CL 5071WA 0102WA 5214WA 0051WA 5141CT 5141CV 5141CW 7179WA 7212WA 0152WA 7277C4 7277C5 7277C6 7277WA 694710 6947C6 6947C7 6947C8 6947C9 0029WA 0029WB 7114WA 5835WC 7169WA 7198WA 7198WB 161914 161916 161917 161918 161919 161920 5216CD 5216CG 5216CH 5216CI 5216CJ 5216CK 5216CL 5216CN 3417C2 3417C3 3417CZ 3417WB 0154WB 0154WC 3557WC 8206CB 8206CC 8206CD 8206CE 8206WA 1368CB 1368CE 1368CF 1368CG 0107WA 0065WA 8907WC 5081WA 7182WA 8877WB 6076WA 7149WA 5056WA 7249WA 7047WB 9776WB 56010 56011 65010 65011 65012 65013 65014 65015 65016 65018 65020 65022 65024 65026 65028 0650C3 65030 65032 65034 65036

WARRANTS AAX-WA ABLEGRP-WA ABRIC-WB AEON-CE AFFIN-CT AFG-CQ AHB-WB AIRASIAC19 AIRASIAC22 AIRASIAC24 AIRASIAC25 AIRASIAC26 AIRASIAC27 AIRASIAC28 AIRASIAC29 AIRASIAC31 AIRASIAC32 AIRPORT-CO AMBANK-CV AMEDIA-WA ANZO-WA ANZO-WB APFT-WA APPASIA-WA APPLE-C13 APPLE-C14 ARK-WB ARMADA-C11 ARMADA-C12 ARMADA-C13 ARMADA-C6 ARMADA-C7 ARMADA-C8 ARMADA-C9 ASDION-WB ASIABIO-WA ASIAPLY-WA ASTRO-CT ASUPREM-WA ASUPREM-WB ATTA-WB ATTA-WC AT-WA AXIATA-C4 AXIATA-C5 AZRB-WA BAT-CE BHS-WA BIMB-WA BINTAI-WA BJASSET-WA BJAUTO-CH BJAUTO-CI BJAUTO-CJ BJAUTO-CK BJAUTO-CL BJCORP-C1 BJCORP-CY BJCORP-CZ BJCORP-WB BJFOOD-WA BJMEDIA-WA BKOON-WA BORNOIL-WB BORNOIL-WC BRIGHT-WB BSTEAD-CK BTM-WA BTM-WB BURSA-C8 CAB-WA CAP-WA CAREPLS-WA CBIP-WA CENSOF-WA CENSOF-WB CIMB-C10 CIMB-C11 CIMB-C7 CIMB-C8 CIMB-C9 CMSB-CM CMSB-CN CMSB-CO COASTAL-CJ COASTAL-CL COASTAL-WA CONNECT-WA CSL-WA CUSCAPI-WA DAYANG-CT DAYANG-CV DAYANG-CW DBE-WA DESTINI-WA DGB-WA DIALOG-C4 DIALOG-C5 DIALOG-C6 DIALOG-WA DIGI-C10 DIGI-C6 DIGI-C7 DIGI-C8 DIGI-C9 DIGISTA-WA DIGISTA-WB DNONCE-WA DOLMITE-WC DOMINAN-WA DPS-WA DPS-WB DRBHCOMC14 DRBHCOMC16 DRBHCOMC17 DRBHCOMC18 DRBHCOMC19 DRBHCOMC20 DSONIC-CD DSONIC-CG DSONIC-CH DSONIC-CI DSONIC-CJ DSONIC-CK DSONIC-CL DSONIC-CN E&O-C2 E&O-C3 E&O-CZ E&O-WB EAH-WB EAH-WC ECOFIRS-WC ECOWLD-CB ECOWLD-CC ECOWLD-CD ECOWLD-CE ECOWLD-WA EDGENTA-CB EDGENTA-CE EDGENTA-CF EDGENTA-CG EDUSPEC-WA EFORCE-WA EG-WC EIG-WA EKA-WA EKOVEST-WB ENCORP-WA ENGKAH-WA ENGTEX-WA EWEIN-WA FAJAR-WB FARMBES-WB FB-C10 FB-C11 FBMKLCI-C10 FBMKLCI-C11 FBMKLCI-C12 FBMKLCI-C13 FBMKLCI-C14 FBMKLCI-C15 FBMKLCI-C16 FBMKLCI-C18 FBMKLCI-C20 FBMKLCI-C22 FBMKLCI-C24 FBMKLCI-C26 FBMKLCI-C28 FBMKLCI-C3 FBMKLCI-C30 FBMKLCI-C32 FBMKLCI-C34 FBMKLCI-C36

CLOSE (RM)

+/(RM)

0.060 0.035 0.195 0.010 0.090 0.005 0.110 0.005 0.030 0.265 0.160 0.380 0.105 0.080 0.040 0.065 0.125 0.040 0.005 0.020 0.055 0.055 0.025 0.080 0.005 0.025 0.085 0.090 0.065 0.125 0.060 0.070 0.115 0.125 0.205 0.025 0.110 0.030 0.005 0.030 0.125 0.660 0.035 0.020 0.120 0.200 0.060 0.145 0.275 0.140 0.150 0.005 0.010 0.105 0.100 0.140 0.055 0.025 0.095 0.140 1.630 0.030 0.040 0.070 0.075 0.120 0.035 0.075 0.110 0.040 1.120 0.005 0.190 0.365 0.085 0.115 0.100 0.190 0.005 0.090 0.050 0.045 0.065 0.075 0.020 0.005 0.070 0.060 0.020 0.045 0.040 0.040 0.085 0.005 0.165 0.020 0.010 0.070 0.080 0.380 0.150 0.020 0.050 0.080 0.105 0.050 0.090 0.070 0.120 0.265 0.035 0.055 0.010 0.010 0.005 0.025 0.095 0.060 0.125 0.050 0.025 0.075 0.135 0.070 0.090 0.145 0.120 0.100 0.060 0.175 0.050 0.045 0.160 0.020 0.090 0.075 0.065 0.375 0.020 0.085 0.105 0.120 0.170 0.420 0.600 0.600 0.040 0.320 0.005 0.200 0.390 0.525 0.155 0.205 0.225 0.170 0.085 0.165 0.205 0.535 0.350 0.315 0.225 0.120 0.330 0.070 0.030 0.310 0.430 0.040 0.095 0.080 0.065 0.120

-0.005 — — — — — Unch — -0.010 -0.020 -0.030 -0.015 -0.010 Unch — -0.005 — -0.015 — — Unch -0.010 0.005 — — — — — — — -0.020 — — — 0.030 Unch Unch — — — — — — -0.010 — — Unch Unch Unch -0.010 — — — — — — — -0.010 Unch -0.005 — — — 0.005 Unch -0.010 — — Unch 0.005 -0.070 Unch Unch 0.010 Unch Unch 0.005 — Unch 0.005 Unch -0.005 — — — — Unch 0.005 Unch — — — 0.005 — 0.010 0.005 — — — Unch — — Unch — 0.005 Unch — -0.005 — Unch 0.005 -0.005 — Unch — — -0.015 — -0.005 — -0.005 — — 0.005 -0.005 — — — — Unch — Unch 0.045 Unch — — — 0.005 — — — — Unch -0.005 -0.020 — Unch — — -0.010 -0.025 -0.025 -0.005 Unch — 0.010 — — 0.015 — — — — — — Unch Unch — -0.020 — — — Unch —

VOL PARENT EXE (‘000) PRICE PRICE 14104.3 — — — — — 138.2 — 422.5 1676 448.1 2511 225.9 46 — 320 — 10 — — 549.5 26 2038 — — — — — — — 192.3 — — — 22.8 25 2788.3 — — — — — — 651.5 — — 30 713.8 1298.3 4107.1 — — — — — — — 2743.4 60 100 — — — 0.2 1550 378.1 — — 35.9 242.9 1236.4 100 686.7 50 48.7 91.1 610 — 100 190 60 260 — — — — 184.6 364.4 150 — — — 300 — 884.5 1151.2 — — — 115 — — 30 — 20 30 — 0.2 — 120 160 920 — 395.2 — — 270 — 651.5 — 1074.5 — — 40 205 — — — — 47.6 — 450 12.5 100.1 — — — 49.8 — — — — 840.1 86 1088.5 — 349.1 — — 0.9 1373.1 1122.2 1006 161.5 — 15 — — 1257.2 — — — — — — 437 589.1 — 0.3 — — — 240 —

0.230 0.110 0.490 2.600 2.150 3.600 0.210 1.390 1.390 1.390 1.390 1.390 1.390 1.390 1.390 1.390 1.390 5.880 4.500 0.100 0.230 0.230 0.070 0.125 406.52 406.54 0.320 1.000 1.000 1.000 1.000 1.000 1.000 1.000 0.460 0.050 0.205 2.660 0.125 0.125 0.540 0.540 0.070 5.800 5.800 0.590 56.640 0.450 3.520 0.280 0.800 2.160 2.160 2.160 2.160 2.160 0.405 0.405 0.405 0.405 2.050 0.415 0.110 0.140 0.140 0.325 4.080 0.250 0.250 8.500 1.700 0.065 0.490 2.130 0.260 0.260 4.470 4.470 4.470 4.470 4.470 5.000 5.000 5.000 1.670 1.670 1.670 0.120 0.105 0.120 1.310 1.310 1.310 0.050 0.565 0.065 1.570 1.570 1.570 1.570 5.000 5.000 5.000 5.000 5.000 0.175 0.175 0.185 0.400 1.170 0.110 0.110 0.980 0.980 0.980 0.980 0.980 0.980 1.390 1.390 1.390 1.390 1.390 1.390 1.390 1.390 1.580 1.580 1.580 1.580 0.100 0.095 0.240 1.300 1.300 1.300 1.300 1.300 3.340 3.340 3.340 3.340 0.300 0.905 0.890 0.900 0.170 1.080 0.770 2.500 1.180 1.090 0.545 0.770 455.99 456.00 1,663 1,663 1,663 1,663 1,663 1,663 1,663 1,663 1,663 1,663 1,663 1,663 1,663 1,663 1,663 1,663 1,663 1,663

0.460 0.150 0.300 3.150 2.400 4.650 0.200 2.500 1.650 1.050 1.200 0.900 1.280 1.480 2.000 1.500 1.500 6.800 6.000 1.100 0.250 0.250 0.400 0.130 540.54 448.90 1.000 1.000 1.150 1.000 1.000 0.950 0.880 0.980 0.500 0.100 0.100 2.650 0.200 0.200 1.000 1.000 0.120 6.400 6.500 0.700 57.000 0.600 4.720 0.200 1.000 2.714 2.300 2.400 2.000 2.200 0.430 0.380 0.370 1.000 0.700 0.870 0.200 0.100 0.100 0.820 4.200 0.940 0.200 8.400 0.550 1.478 0.320 2.400 0.460 0.460 4.800 4.500 5.650 5.000 5.100 5.200 5.000 5.300 3.400 3.150 3.180 0.100 1.150 0.270 1.580 1.780 1.500 0.100 0.400 0.110 1.800 1.500 1.480 1.190 5.700 5.400 5.000 5.750 5.100 0.130 0.260 0.250 0.500 1.300 0.540 0.100 1.600 1.400 1.450 1.300 1.000 1.100 1.180 1.580 1.700 1.380 1.480 1.630 1.420 1.450 1.550 1.680 1.814 2.600 0.120 0.100 0.300 1.680 1.300 1.400 1.520 2.080 3.400 3.300 3.600 3.230 0.180 0.680 0.500 0.500 0.200 1.350 1.000 3.500 0.830 0.610 0.700 1.000 320.43 422.29 1,720 1,600 1,520 1,560 1,500 1,575 1,625 1,680 1,640 1,630 1,720 1,750 1,670 1,708 1,658 1,688 1,660 1,770

PR’M (%) 126.09 68.18 1.02 22.31 15.81 29.72 47.62 81.29 23.02 4.14 0.14 5.76 14.75 23.74 51.08 23.35 30.40 18.37 34.00 1,020 32.61 32.61 507.14 68.00 33.83 14.11 239.06 18.00 28.00 25.00 12.00 6.20 16.75 29.25 53.26 150.00 2.44 4.14 64.00 84.00 108.33 207.41 121.43 11.38 20.34 52.54 5.93 65.56 41.90 21.43 43.75 26.65 8.52 25.69 4.17 21.30 23.83 0.00 14.81 181.48 13.66 116.87 118.18 21.43 25.00 189.23 6.37 306.00 24.00 1.65 -1.76 2,181 4.08 29.81 109.62 121.15 18.57 14.27 26.85 19.91 18.57 10.30 10.40 13.50 108.38 89.82 94.61 33.33 1,014 162.50 32.82 46.56 30.73 110.00 0.00 100.00 15.92 6.69 14.65 0.00 26.00 9.60 8.00 20.60 7.25 2.86 100.00 72.97 55.00 33.76 422.73 40.91 65.31 44.90 48.72 39.03 11.73 27.55 7.37 28.06 30.04 18.17 40.47 32.37 28.06 30.40 13.29 18.99 25.96 75.63 70.00 52.63 91.67 33.08 13.85 19.23 26.92 88.85 4.19 11.53 23.50 11.08 16.67 21.55 23.60 22.22 41.18 54.63 30.52 48.00 3.39 4.13 56.88 56.49 -0.12 11.25 4.42 1.15 0.01 1.83 -1.45 2.22 3.08 6.05 3.56 0.94 4.66 9.87 6.86 6.10 8.87 9.23 2.53 10.01

EXPIRY DATE 08/06/2020 19/01/2017 07/04/2016 30/06/2016 30/09/2016 29/04/2016 28/08/2019 29/02/2016 29/04/2016 31/05/2016 07/03/2016 18/07/2016 28/10/2016 28/10/2016 31/05/2016 15/08/2016 30/09/2016 30/06/2016 31/03/2016 02/01/2018 19/11/2019 25/08/2023 13/07/2018 23/12/2024 29/02/2016 29/04/2016 30/06/2021 07/10/2016 29/07/2016 30/09/2016 30/08/2016 07/03/2016 28/11/2016 28/11/2016 24/03/2019 19/04/2024 13/12/2020 29/02/2016 08/08/2016 20/06/2018 09/05/2022 18/11/2024 29/01/2019 29/07/2016 28/10/2016 13/05/2024 29/07/2016 18/10/2020 04/12/2023 15/06/2020 16/03/2018 10/03/2016 29/02/2016 18/07/2016 31/05/2016 29/07/2016 30/08/2016 07/03/2016 31/10/2016 22/04/2022 08/08/2017 16/12/2016 07/07/2023 28/02/2018 08/11/2025 12/01/2019 29/04/2016 20/12/2019 23/10/2024 29/04/2016 08/02/2020 29/12/2016 09/08/2016 06/11/2019 18/07/2017 07/10/2019 10/08/2016 30/08/2016 15/04/2016 18/07/2016 29/04/2016 08/06/2016 08/06/2016 31/03/2016 10/03/2016 29/02/2016 18/07/2016 17/09/2021 18/09/2017 24/04/2018 28/11/2016 28/11/2016 07/10/2016 22/03/2016 03/10/2016 22/04/2018 11/03/2016 29/07/2016 28/11/2016 10/02/2017 28/10/2016 15/04/2016 18/07/2016 31/05/2016 30/09/2016 07/02/2017 04/04/2023 25/11/2020 08/08/2017 10/09/2020 03/01/2018 15/01/2025 29/04/2016 30/08/2016 29/04/2016 29/07/2016 30/11/2016 30/11/2016 28/04/2016 28/10/2016 29/04/2016 30/08/2016 30/08/2016 30/08/2016 29/07/2016 23/11/2016 28/07/2016 28/07/2016 08/06/2016 21/07/2019 24/02/2019 18/06/2019 10/09/2019 30/06/2016 28/07/2016 28/07/2016 28/07/2016 26/03/2022 29/02/2016 10/08/2016 29/07/2016 31/10/2016 24/12/2018 17/07/2019 03/11/2020 03/01/2017 22/01/2019 25/06/2019 17/03/2016 25/09/2017 25/10/2017 09/06/2017 24/09/2019 13/07/2018 29/02/2016 29/09/2016 29/02/2016 29/02/2016 31/03/2016 31/03/2016 17/03/2016 17/03/2016 17/03/2016 29/04/2016 31/03/2016 29/04/2016 31/05/2016 31/05/2016 31/05/2016 30/06/2016 30/09/2016 30/09/2016 30/06/2016 30/06/2016

YEAR HIGH

YEAR LOW

DAY HIGH

DAY LOW

CODE

0.290 0.195 0.045 0.150 0.370 0.405 0.180 0.995 0.150 0.080 0.405 1.060 0.180 0.705 0.180 0.130 0.710 1.320 0.900 0.150 0.130 0.265 0.280 0.410 0.365 0.190 0.160 0.140 0.395 0.380 0.545 0.130 0.635 0.290 0.285 0.345 0.530 0.595 0.590 0.640 0.625 0.280 0.325 0.675 0.070 0.210 0.210 0.340 0.150 1.600 0.250 0.040 0.040 0.065 0.620 0.145 0.250 0.075 0.145 0.140 0.120 0.640 0.640 0.195 0.145 0.155 0.160 2.950 0.140 0.135 0.325 0.250 0.215 0.105 2.290 0.150 0.265 0.100 0.055 0.155 0.085 0.180 0.065 0.615 0.655 0.390 0.365 0.205 0.295 6.000 0.860 0.240 0.165 0.120 0.100 1.510 0.250 0.300 0.970 0.370 0.865 0.715 1.320 1.790 2.140 1.060 1.380 1.730 0.550 0.840 1.210 0.490 0.765 1.140 1.310 1.590 0.015 0.010 0.064 0.405 0.460 0.140 0.165 0.055 0.045 0.150 0.270 0.355 0.435 0.310 0.215 0.325 0.270 0.165 3.552 2.320 0.040 0.425 0.115 0.240 0.160 0.395 0.145 0.210 0.215 0.155 0.095 0.180 0.185 0.200 0.135 0.150 0.160 0.155 0.935 0.180 0.370 0.105 0.115 0.185 0.510 0.325 0.265 0.240 3.000 0.945 0.350 0.040 0.205 0.240 0.585 0.235 0.270 0.100 0.745 1.520 0.700 0.360 0.280 0.060 0.060

0.160 0.045 0.015 0.150 0.300 0.350 0.145 0.220 0.005 0.005 0.095 0.025 0.055 0.165 0.045 0.035 0.415 0.135 0.585 0.115 0.100 0.135 0.180 0.010 0.245 0.085 0.140 0.120 0.285 0.005 0.410 0.085 0.120 0.015 0.070 0.100 0.080 0.085 0.100 0.075 0.085 0.195 0.255 0.060 0.005 0.025 0.025 0.110 0.050 1.350 0.105 0.005 0.015 0.030 0.390 0.045 0.050 0.010 0.070 0.130 0.035 0.105 0.340 0.010 0.070 0.075 0.135 1.500 0.005 0.045 0.185 0.080 0.065 0.090 0.530 0.065 0.125 0.020 0.025 0.005 0.080 0.060 0.005 0.050 0.145 0.165 0.185 0.140 0.235 2.170 0.160 0.115 0.060 0.070 0.060 0.625 0.025 0.155 0.370 0.215 0.005 0.005 0.020 0.040 0.155 0.015 0.060 0.200 0.065 0.130 0.280 0.305 0.490 0.780 1.050 1.570 0.005 0.005 0.004 0.160 0.245 0.045 0.100 0.005 0.040 0.045 0.065 0.150 0.170 0.150 0.110 0.145 0.110 0.130 2.003 0.813 0.015 0.150 0.015 0.100 0.020 0.135 0.020 0.025 0.015 0.060 0.035 0.055 0.145 0.145 0.045 0.025 0.065 0.050 0.120 0.005 0.105 0.085 0.090 0.145 0.030 0.115 0.105 0.085 0.600 0.350 0.075 0.010 0.065 0.090 0.130 0.040 0.010 0.045 0.470 0.430 0.300 0.215 0.150 0.025 0.025

— 0.050 — — — — — — — 0.005 — — — 0.190 0.055 0.045 — — — — — 0.155 — — — 0.095 — — — 0.005 0.445 — — 0.015 — — 0.210 0.205 0.180 0.150 0.210 — — 0.450 — 0.075 0.030 — — — 0.110 0.010 0.020 — — — — 0.015 — — 0.075 — — 0.140 — 0.090 — 2.800 0.010 0.120 0.290 0.110 0.195 0.105 1.220 — 0.160 — 0.035 0.010 — 0.120 — — 0.635 — — — — 5.900 0.255 — 0.060 — — 1.220 — — 0.490 0.265 — — 0.020 0.065 0.255 0.025 0.095 0.300 — 0.175 0.400 0.435 0.690 1.060 1.110 — 0.005 0.010 — — 0.375 — — 0.020 — — — 0.260 0.260 — — — 0.130 — — 1.700 0.020 0.180 — 0.185 0.020 — — 0.030 0.025 0.065 0.045 — — — — — — 0.070 0.580 0.025 0.250 — 0.095 — 0.350 0.220 0.175 0.145 2.690 0.775 0.135 0.015 0.085 0.120 0.375 0.040 0.025 0.045 0.530 0.515 0.360 0.255 0.180 0.040 0.040

— 0.050 — — — — — — — 0.005 — — — 0.185 0.050 0.045 — — — — — 0.150 — — — 0.090 — — — 0.005 0.430 — — 0.015 — — 0.200 0.200 0.180 0.145 0.200 — — 0.430 — 0.075 0.025 — — — 0.105 0.005 0.015 — — — — 0.015 — — 0.075 — — 0.130 — 0.090 — 2.800 0.010 0.085 0.290 0.090 0.150 0.095 1.190 — 0.150 — 0.030 0.010 — 0.120 — — 0.635 — — — — 5.900 0.205 — 0.060 — — 1.130 — — 0.450 0.260 — — 0.020 0.050 0.200 0.020 0.065 0.245 — 0.145 0.340 0.390 0.600 0.965 1.050 — 0.005 0.005 — — 0.375 — — 0.020 — — — 0.260 0.240 — — — 0.120 — — 1.630 0.015 0.180 — 0.185 0.020 — — 0.030 0.015 0.060 0.040 — — — — — — 0.070 0.535 0.010 0.220 — 0.090 — 0.340 0.220 0.150 0.135 2.610 0.770 0.105 0.015 0.080 0.115 0.355 0.040 0.010 0.045 0.530 0.485 0.350 0.240 0.180 0.030 0.030

65038 0650C4 65040 65042 65044 65046 65048 0650C9 0650CU 0650CV 65019 0650H2 65021 65023 65025 65027 65029 0650H3 65031 65033 65035 65037 65039 0650H4 65041 65043 65045 65047 65049 0650H5 65051 65053 0650H6 0650H7 0650H8 0650H9 0650HN 0650HO 0650HU 0650HV 0650HW 0650JA 0650JB 8605WB 5222C4 5222C6 5222C7 5222C8 5222C9 6939WB 9318WB 0109WA 0109WB 0116WC 7210WA 9377WA 539821 539822 539823 539827 5209CT 5226WA 3611WA 0078CB 471511 471512 471513 2291WA 318222 318224 318225 318226 318227 318228 3182WA 70010 1147WA 0074WA 7096WA 7022CE 7022CG 7676WB 7253WA 3034CK 3034CN 3034CO 3034CP 3034CQ 3034CR 3034WA 5168CP 5168CQ 5168CR 5168CS 5168CT 5095WB 5072WA 3301CF 5169WA 7213WB 65110 65111 65112 65113 65114 65115 65116 65117 65118 65119 65120 65121 65122 65123 65125 65127 7013WA 7013WB 9601WC 4251WA 0081WA 5225CW 5225CX 3336CW 3336CX 2216CD 0166CG 0166CI 0166CJ 0166CK 0166CL 0166CM 0166CN 0166CO 0166WA 0166WB 0094WA 3379WB 1961C6 1961C8 5249CI 8834WB 7183WA 0010WA 0010WB 5175WA 0024WA 5161CR 5161CS 5161CT 5161CU 5161CV 9083WB 8923WA 7167WA 4383CD 4383CE 4383CF 4383CG 4383CH 5247CH 5247CI 5247CK 5247CL 7216WA 7161WA 3565WE 0036WA 7164WA 7164WB 7017WB 7153CK 7153CL 7153CM 5878WB 5038WA 5789WA 5789WB 7126WA 5068WA 5068WB

WARRANTS FBMKLCI-C38 FBMKLCI-C4 FBMKLCI-C40 FBMKLCI-C42 FBMKLCI-C44 FBMKLCI-C46 FBMKLCI-C48 FBMKLCI-C9 FBMKLCI-CU FBMKLCI-CV FBMKLCI-H19 FBMKLCI-H2 FBMKLCI-H21 FBMKLCI-H23 FBMKLCI-H25 FBMKLCI-H27 FBMKLCI-H29 FBMKLCI-H3 FBMKLCI-H31 FBMKLCI-H33 FBMKLCI-H35 FBMKLCI-H37 FBMKLCI-H39 FBMKLCI-H4 FBMKLCI-H41 FBMKLCI-H43 FBMKLCI-H45 FBMKLCI-H47 FBMKLCI-H49 FBMKLCI-H5 FBMKLCI-H51 FBMKLCI-H53 FBMKLCI-H6 FBMKLCI-H7 FBMKLCI-H8 FBMKLCI-H9 FBMKLCI-HN FBMKLCI-HO FBMKLCI-HU FBMKLCI-HV FBMKLCI-HW FBMKLCI-JA FBMKLCI-JB FFHB-WB FGV-C4 FGV-C6 FGV-C7 FGV-C8 FGV-C9 FIAMMA-WB FITTERS-WB FLONIC-WA FLONIC-WB FOCUS-WC FREIGHT-WA FSBM-WA GAMUDA-C21 GAMUDA-C22 GAMUDA-C23 GAMUDA-C27 GASMSIA-CT GBGAQRS-WA GBH-WA GDEX-CB GENM-C11 GENM-C12 GENM-C13 GENP-WA GENTINGC22 GENTINGC24 GENTINGC25 GENTINGC26 GENTINGC27 GENTINGC28 GENTING-WA GLD-C10 GOB-WA GOCEAN-WA GPA-WA GTRONIC-CE GTRONIC-CG GUNUNG-WB HANDAL-WA HAPSENG-CK HAPSENG-CN HAPSENG-CO HAPSENG-CP HAPSENG-CQ HAPSENG-CR HAPSENG-WA HARTA-CP HARTA-CQ HARTA-CR HARTA-CS HARTA-CT HEVEA-WB HIAPTEK-WA HLIND-CF HOHUP-WA HOVID-WB HSI-C10 HSI-C11 HSI-C12 HSI-C13 HSI-C14 HSI-C15 HSI-C16 HSI-C17 HSI-C18 HSI-C19 HSI-C20 HSI-C21 HSI-C22 HSI-C23 HSI-H25 HSI-H27 HUBLINE-WA HUBLINE-WB HWGB-WC IBHD-WA IDEAL-WA IHH-CW IHH-CX IJM-CW IJM-CX IJMPLNT-CD INARI-CG INARI-CI INARI-CJ INARI-CK INARI-CL INARI-CM INARI-CN INARI-CO INARI-WA INARI-WB INIX-WA INSAS-WB IOICORP-C6 IOICORP-C8 IOIPG-CI IREKA-WB IRETEX-WA IRIS-WA IRIS-WB IVORY-WA JAG-WA JCY-CR JCY-CS JCY-CT JCY-CU JCY-CV JETSON-WB JIANKUN-WA JOHOTIN-WA JTIASA-CD JTIASA-CE JTIASA-CF JTIASA-CG JTIASA-CH KAREX-CH KAREX-CI KAREX-CK KAREX-CL KAWAN-WA KERJAYA-WA KEURO-WE KGROUP-WA KNM-WA KNM-WB KOMARK-WB KOSSAN-CK KOSSAN-CL KOSSAN-CM KPJ-WB KSL-WA LBS-WA LBS-WB LONBISC-WA LUSTER-WA LUSTER-WB

CLOSE (RM)

+/(RM)

0.185 0.050 0.020 0.150 0.315 0.395 0.145 0.265 0.005 0.005 0.115 0.025 0.055 0.190 0.050 0.045 0.435 0.175 0.630 0.120 0.110 0.150 0.185 0.010 0.245 0.090 0.140 0.120 0.305 0.005 0.440 0.095 0.120 0.015 0.070 0.100 0.200 0.205 0.180 0.150 0.205 0.240 0.275 0.440 0.005 0.075 0.025 0.120 0.065 1.450 0.105 0.010 0.020 0.035 0.430 0.045 0.055 0.015 0.080 0.140 0.075 0.115 0.420 0.130 0.070 0.090 0.135 2.800 0.010 0.120 0.290 0.110 0.190 0.105 1.210 0.125 0.155 0.050 0.035 0.010 0.080 0.120 0.005 0.615 0.635 0.390 0.360 0.205 0.280 5.900 0.205 0.115 0.060 0.070 0.060 1.160 0.030 0.285 0.490 0.265 0.005 0.005 0.020 0.065 0.245 0.025 0.090 0.280 0.090 0.170 0.400 0.430 0.690 1.050 1.060 1.590 0.005 0.010 0.020 0.170 0.375 0.100 0.135 0.020 0.045 0.045 0.130 0.260 0.260 0.215 0.160 0.160 0.125 0.130 3.100 1.680 0.015 0.180 0.095 0.185 0.020 0.200 0.025 0.030 0.015 0.060 0.040 0.055 0.155 0.145 0.045 0.025 0.105 0.070 0.575 0.015 0.220 0.105 0.090 0.150 0.340 0.220 0.150 0.135 2.680 0.770 0.135 0.015 0.080 0.115 0.375 0.040 0.020 0.045 0.530 0.485 0.350 0.255 0.180 0.040 0.040

— Unch — — — — — — — Unch — — — -0.005 -0.010 -0.005 — — — — — -0.010 — — — -0.005 — — — Unch -0.005 — — -0.020 — — -0.010 Unch -0.005 Unch -0.010 — — -0.010 — Unch Unch — — — -0.015 0.005 0.005 — — — — 0.005 — — Unch — — -0.010 — 0.010 — Unch Unch 0.045 0.025 0.010 0.040 0.015 0.020 — -0.010 — 0.005 0.005 — Unch — — -0.015 — — — — -0.030 -0.075 — -0.010 — — -0.040 — — Unch Unch — — Unch 0.025 0.025 0.010 0.030 0.055 — 0.035 0.085 0.075 0.135 0.080 -0.100 — Unch Unch — — Unch — — Unch — — — -0.030 0.015 — — — Unch — — 0.010 -0.010 -0.005 — -0.025 -0.075 — — -0.015 -0.010 Unch -0.005 — — — — — — Unch -0.020 Unch -0.005 — Unch — Unch 0.005 -0.015 -0.005 0.060 -0.005 Unch Unch Unch Unch 0.005 -0.010 -0.010 -0.005 0.030 -0.015 0.015 0.010 0.010 Unch Unch

VOL PARENT EXE (‘000) PRICE PRICE — 402.1 — — — — — — — 50 — — — 113.1 5914.1 50 — — — — — 320 — — — 872.9 — — — 4430 1299.6 — — 20 — — 154 446 80 230 1358.6 — — 459 — 225.9 1594.8 — — — 215.4 3906.6 200.1 — — — — 450 — — 21.4 — — 530 — 224 — 111.1 133.5 101.6 11 133 699.6 449 1517.5 — 250 — 2894.6 92.1 — 130 — — 80 — — — — 2.4 193.5 — 50 — — 497.3 — — 6.5 1209.5 — — 30 2701.4 20427.7 2191 1173.6 20450.6 — 10106 1064.2 1218.3 723.5 901.6 60 — 820 4525.5 — — 10 — — 55.5 — — — 25 1933.6 — — — 350 — — 253.3 643 51.2 — 20 500 — — 102.8 6381.5 50 140 — — — — — — 30 202.4 6822.3 595 — 420 — 86 50 193 634 17 70 93 8769.9 2618.3 55.7 617.9 30 663.6 100 1 70 103.7 195.5 1.6 381 1033.6

1,663 1,663 1,663 1,663 1,663 1,663 1,663 1,663 1,663 1,663 1,663 1,663 1,663 1,663 1,663 1,663 1,663 1,663 1,663 1,663 1,663 1,663 1,663 1,663 1,663 1,663 1,663 1,663 1,663 1,663 1,663 1,663 1,663 1,663 1,663 1,663 1,663 1,663 1,663 1,663 1,663 1,663 1,663 0.910 1.570 1.570 1.570 1.570 1.570 2.150 0.440 0.050 0.050 0.080 1.280 0.160 4.470 4.470 4.470 4.470 2.350 0.850 1.400 1.670 4.200 4.200 4.200 10.800 8.000 8.000 8.000 8.000 8.000 8.000 8.000 484.65 0.460 0.095 0.090 5.500 5.500 0.440 0.290 7.600 7.600 7.600 7.600 7.600 7.600 7.600 4.600 4.600 4.600 4.600 4.600 1.400 0.215 6.230 0.840 0.445 10,512 10,512 10,512 10,511 10,511 10,512 10,511 10,511 10,511 10,512 10,512 10,511 10,511 10,511 10,511 10,511 0.010 0.010 0.075 0.480 0.470 6.500 6.500 3.400 3.400 3.730 3.300 3.300 3.300 3.300 3.300 3.300 3.300 3.300 3.300 3.300 0.060 0.710 4.770 4.770 2.070 0.500 0.235 0.180 0.180 0.370 0.095 0.720 0.720 0.720 0.720 0.720 0.255 0.220 2.060 1.440 1.440 1.440 1.440 1.440 4.060 4.060 4.060 4.060 3.670 1.690 0.905 0.065 0.460 0.460 0.570 6.340 6.340 6.340 4.350 1.300 1.350 1.350 0.795 0.075 0.075

1,690 1,700 1,800 1,730 1,720 1,640 1,600 1,640 1,848 1,808 1,675 1,600 1,500 1,600 1,600 1,550 1,630 1,680 1,710 1,588 1,538 1,680 1,570 1,600 1,650 1,600 1,538 1,488 1,600 1,500 1,680 1,570 1,520 1,500 1,575 1,625 1,788 1,808 1,688 1,658 1,700 1,266 1,108 0.500 2.300 1.500 1.550 1.500 1.900 1.000 1.000 0.050 0.050 0.050 0.970 0.300 4.300 5.100 4.500 5.000 2.500 1.300 1.000 1.500 4.450 4.250 4.300 7.750 8.600 8.000 7.000 8.000 7.400 7.800 7.960 485.64 0.800 0.340 0.100 6.100 6.300 0.400 0.860 3.900 5.000 6.000 7.000 6.800 6.600 1.650 8.800 4.780 6.100 6.000 6.000 0.250 0.690 4.500 0.600 0.180 24,800 26,200 23,000 21,600 20,200 23,800 22,400 21,000 24,200 22,800 21,400 22,000 20,600 19,200 19,000 20,400 0.160 0.010 0.200 1.410 0.100 6.000 5.500 3.940 3.600 3.700 2.704 2.320 2.640 2.704 2.864 2.880 3.200 3.024 0.264 1.600 0.100 1.000 4.300 4.000 2.200 1.000 0.800 0.150 0.150 0.750 0.100 0.720 0.800 0.980 0.790 0.950 0.750 0.320 2.280 1.800 1.100 2.000 1.750 1.600 3.000 2.987 3.450 4.500 0.930 0.880 1.180 0.100 0.980 1.000 0.300 7.500 10.000 9.000 4.010 0.800 1.000 1.250 1.000 0.100 0.100

PR’M (%) 7.16 4.20 9.06 11.22 9.08 5.72 2.29 1.78 11.45 9.10 3.45 -3.51 -7.51 -0.96 -1.71 -4.92 4.53 3.10 12.27 4.18 0.45 7.31 -0.06 -3.51 6.56 -0.02 0.04 -4.77 1.69 -9.61 8.94 -1.62 -6.82 -9.47 -3.64 0.08 15.96 18.61 10.19 6.94 10.42 -2.25 -3.63 3.30 47.77 9.87 4.94 10.83 35.10 13.95 151.14 20.00 40.00 6.25 9.38 115.63 0.63 15.44 14.99 24.38 12.77 66.47 1.43 5.39 11.95 7.62 15.24 -2.31 8.75 12.00 5.63 6.19 4.37 13.25 14.63 9.49 107.61 310.53 50.00 12.00 23.27 18.18 198.28 -0.13 -0.79 -5.66 8.68 2.96 5.26 -0.66 109.13 26.41 41.74 42.61 42.17 0.71 234.88 -0.32 29.76 0.00 135.96 149.28 118.97 106.04 94.26 126.62 113.87 102.17 131.00 118.35 107.00 112.97 101.88 91.65 89.84 107.68 1,550 100.00 193.33 229.17 1.06 1.54 1.23 16.76 12.50 4.02 0.85 1.82 5.21 13.21 17.82 6.67 12.12 13.70 1.94 -0.61 91.67 66.20 2.10 -0.63 8.21 140.00 251.06 0.00 -8.33 118.92 47.37 15.28 43.40 56.25 22.22 38.89 235.29 77.27 38.59 27.08 6.94 68.06 47.78 31.94 1.81 2.46 7.14 24.14 -1.63 -2.37 45.30 76.92 130.43 142.39 18.42 24.61 58.99 51.89 4.37 -1.15 0.00 11.48 48.43 86.67 86.67

EXPIRY DATE 30/06/2016 29/07/2016 29/07/2016 31/01/2017 29/07/2016 29/07/2016 30/08/2016 29/02/2016 31/03/2016 31/03/2016 17/03/2016 29/02/2016 29/04/2016 31/03/2016 29/04/2016 31/05/2016 31/05/2016 29/02/2016 31/05/2016 30/09/2016 30/09/2016 30/06/2016 30/06/2016 29/02/2016 30/06/2016 29/07/2016 31/01/2017 31/01/2017 29/07/2016 31/03/2016 29/07/2016 30/08/2016 31/03/2016 17/03/2016 17/03/2016 17/03/2016 31/03/2016 31/03/2016 30/06/2016 30/06/2016 29/07/2016 31/03/2016 31/03/2016 30/03/2017 31/03/2016 29/07/2016 31/03/2016 18/07/2016 31/05/2016 26/11/2018 12/10/2019 16/06/2017 06/11/2019 06/11/2019 06/01/2017 16/05/2022 29/02/2016 29/04/2016 28/07/2016 30/11/2016 30/08/2016 20/07/2018 07/04/2020 08/06/2016 29/04/2016 31/05/2016 30/09/2016 17/06/2019 31/03/2016 08/06/2016 18/07/2016 31/03/2016 31/05/2016 23/11/2016 18/12/2018 29/09/2016 24/12/2019 07/08/2019 03/06/2025 11/03/2016 30/09/2016 02/10/2020 05/04/2016 29/02/2016 30/08/2016 31/05/2016 31/05/2016 07/10/2016 30/11/2016 09/08/2016 15/04/2016 28/10/2016 28/10/2016 31/01/2017 31/01/2017 28/02/2020 09/01/2017 10/03/2016 21/12/2018 05/06/2018 26/02/2016 26/02/2016 30/03/2016 30/03/2016 30/03/2016 28/04/2016 28/04/2016 28/04/2016 29/06/2016 29/06/2016 29/06/2016 28/07/2016 28/07/2016 28/07/2016 28/07/2016 28/07/2016 04/11/2019 20/12/2020 22/09/2016 08/10/2019 29/04/2019 29/04/2016 07/04/2016 31/05/2016 25/08/2016 10/03/2016 28/04/2016 08/06/2016 18/07/2016 28/10/2016 28/10/2016 10/08/2016 31/05/2016 30/08/2016 04/06/2018 17/02/2020 16/11/2020 25/02/2020 31/03/2016 15/04/2016 10/03/2016 25/06/2019 10/06/2019 24/06/2016 20/04/2016 26/04/2017 14/08/2019 30/08/2016 30/08/2016 30/08/2016 07/10/2016 07/10/2016 06/02/2019 23/12/2021 21/11/2017 31/03/2016 18/07/2016 31/01/2017 15/08/2016 30/09/2016 31/03/2016 28/04/2016 28/10/2016 29/07/2016 28/07/2016 20/12/2017 26/08/2016 02/07/2018 15/11/2017 21/04/2020 21/01/2020 18/07/2016 31/05/2016 31/01/2017 23/01/2019 19/08/2016 11/06/2018 04/10/2020 26/01/2020 03/06/2022 26/05/2023

Wa ear inv

NE US two of the the lac ing ma mo era 16 3.6 Th 8.2 rou its an

cen con wit sta

it w sa ou ch Pri

Bu Ma Y H 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Markets 2 9

M O N DAY F E BRUA RY 29 , 2016 • T HEED G E FINA NCIA L DA ILY

B U R S A M A L AY S I A E Q U I T Y D E R I VAT I V E S

RY ATE 016 016 016 017 016 016 016 016 016 016 016 016 016 016 016 016 016 016 016 016 016 016 016 016 016 016 017 017 016 016 016 016 016 016 016 016 016 016 016 016 016 016 016 017 016 016 016 016 016 018 019 017 019 019 017 022 016 016 016 016 016 018 020 016 016 016 016 019 016 016 016 016 016 016 018 016 019 019 025 016 016 020 016 016 016 016 016 016 016 016 016 016 016 017 017 020 017 016 018 018 016 016 016 016 016 016 016 016 016 016 016 016 016 016 016 016 019 020 016 019 019 016 016 016 016 016 016 016 016 016 016 016 016 016 018 020 020 020 016 016 016 019 019 016 016 017 019 016 016 016 016 016 019 021 017 016 016 017 016 016 016 016 016 016 016 017 016 018 017 020 020 016 016 017 019 016 018 020 020 022 023

Wall Street week ahead — As earnings season wraps up, investors turn to data NEW YORK: Investors hoping that US stocks will build on a strong two-week run will look to a host of data this week, highlighted by the monthly jobs report, for signs the economy is improving. With a lacklustre earnings season winding down, it will take some solid macroeconomic data to keep the momentum going on Wall Street. The Dow Jones Industrial Average fell 57.32 points or 0.34% to 16,639.97 and the S&P 500 lost 3.65 points or 0.19% to 1,948.05. The Nasdaq Composite added 8.27 points or 0.18% to 4,590.47. The S&P 500 Index has rallied roughly 5% in the past fortnight, its best two-week run in a year, and is up 4% from its Feb 11 low. Those gains have come as recent data has diminished investor concerns about a recession and with oil prices showing signs of stabilising around US$30 a barrel. “If you go back a couple weeks, it was really the positive retail sales report that kind of got us out of the funk,” said Jack Ablin, chief investment officer at BMO Private Bank in Chicago.

“Now that earnings reports are behind us, the economic data will take centre stage.” Non-farm payrolls for February capped off the week last Friday and are expected to increase by 193,000 jobs, and the unemployment rate is forecast to hold at 4.9%. January’s report showed job gains slowed more than expected, although rising wages and the low unemployment rate indicated the labour market remains firm. Also due tomorrow are reports on activity in the manufacturing and services sectors from Markit, a data firm, and the Institute for Supply Management. While manufacturing is expected to remain soft, the data will be eyed for signs the sector is close to bottoming. Services activity data will also be in focus after an early reading last Wednesday from Markit showed the sector, which had been a bright spot in the economy, contracted in February for the first time since October 2013. “The services [report] is what you want to watch,” said Art Hogan, chief market strategist at Wunderlich Securities in New York.

Global markets — US consumer spending, inflation data keep rate hikes on table NEW YORK: Southeast Asian stock markets rose last Friday, with key indices in Singapore and Indonesia climbing almost 2%.

Index points

18580

3415

16310

-57.32 (-0.34%)

11770

2,929.16 +51.74 (+1.80%)

DAY HIGH

DAY LOW

CODE

0.470 0.055 0.090 0.050 0.380 0.300 0.350 0.070 0.060 0.235 0.070 0.240 0.280 0.590 1.230 0.105 0.470 0.140 0.210 0.780 0.470 1.440 0.200 0.190 0.590 0.205 0.530 0.240 0.360 0.180 0.100 0.040 0.125 0.240 0.130 0.110 0.375 0.470 0.025 0.100 0.385 0.260 0.140 0.280 0.620 0.310 0.185 0.130 0.600 0.120 0.340 2.300 1.110 0.055 0.205 0.405 0.130 0.035 0.105 0.150 0.105 0.070 0.060 0.530 0.320 0.200 0.050 0.160 0.325

0.240 0.010 0.045 0.005 0.130 0.100 0.135 0.005 0.010 0.010 0.040 0.215 0.155 0.060 0.350 0.050 0.155 0.005 0.115 0.280 0.235 0.500 0.115 0.010 0.060 0.005 0.020 0.075 0.160 0.115 0.085 0.015 0.060 0.155 0.050 0.005 0.120 0.255 0.010 0.010 0.230 0.175 0.120 0.130 0.125 0.075 0.110 0.020 0.330 0.005 0.120 0.705 0.695 0.030 0.015 0.160 0.040 0.020 0.030 0.010 0.075 0.020 0.015 0.090 0.085 0.070 0.015 0.020 0.010

0.325 0.015 0.050 0.005 0.165 0.135 0.180 0.015 0.010 0.010 0.055 0.225 0.200 0.065 0.365 0.100 0.165 0.010 0.125 0.570 0.400 0.750 0.190 0.010 0.150 0.015 0.190 0.150 0.270 0.135 0.095 0.025 0.070 0.160 0.130 0.005 0.135 0.285 0.015 0.020 0.230 0.190 0.120 0.205 0.135 0.235 0.140 0.050 0.395 0.015 0.215 1.290 0.900 0.030 0.090 0.310 0.045 0.035 0.055 0.085 0.080 0.025 0.025 0.355 0.095 0.150 0.020 0.045 0.150

0.325 0.015 0.050 0.005 0.160 0.130 0.160 0.010 0.010 0.010 0.045 0.215 0.200 0.060 0.350 0.060 0.165 0.005 0.125 0.565 0.380 0.680 0.190 0.010 0.125 0.010 0.185 0.140 0.260 0.125 0.085 0.025 0.070 0.155 0.120 0.005 0.135 0.275 0.015 0.020 0.230 0.175 0.120 0.200 0.125 0.215 0.135 0.045 0.390 0.010 0.215 1.250 0.860 0.030 0.080 0.295 0.045 0.020 0.050 0.070 0.075 0.025 0.015 0.320 0.095 0.140 0.015 0.040 0.145

7617WB 3859CW 8583C2 8583CZ 8583WB 8583WC 6181WB 6012CQ 115513 115515 115517 115518 5152WA 5983WA 1171WA 0167WB 3662WB 5186CX 3816C2 9571WC 9571WD 6114WB 7595WA 2194CZ 3867CA 1651C5 1651C6 1651WA 0138CT 0138CU 0138CW 0096WB 0083WB 0172WA 0018WA 9008WA 9008WB 5053WC 0005WA 1295C4 5183C1 5183C4 5183C5 9997WB 8311WC 5681CP 5681CQ 6033CM 1945WC 8869CL 8869CM 8869WC 7088WB 4634CV 5204CB 7168WA 0007WA 0007WB 5256WA 7232WA 5270WA 0133WB 0133WC 7073WA 0055WA 4197C3 0060WA 521815 521816

WARRANTS

Feb 26, 2016

MAGNA-WB MAGNUM-CW MAHSING-C2 MAHSING-CZ MAHSING-WB MAHSING-WC MALTON-WB MAXIS-CQ MAYBANKC13 MAYBANKC15 MAYBANKC17 MAYBANKC18 MBL-WA MBMR-WA MBSB-WA MCLEAN-WB MFLOUR-WB MHB-CX MISC-C2 MITRA-WC MITRA-WD MKH-WB MLGLOBAL-WA MMCCORP-CZ MPI-CA MRCB-C5 MRCB-C6 MRCB-WA MYEG-CT MYEG-CU MYEG-CW NEXGRAM-WB NOTION-WB OCK-WA OMEDIA-WA OMESTI-WA OMESTI-WB OSK-WC PALETTE-WA PBBANK-C4 PCHEM-C1 PCHEM-C4 PCHEM-C5 PENSONI-WB PESONA-WC PETDAG-CP PETDAG-CQ PETGAS-CM PJDEV-WC PMETAL-CL PMETAL-CM PMETAL-WC POHUAT-WB POS-CV PRESBHD-CB PRG-WA PUC-WA PUC-WB REACH-WA RESINTC-WA RSENA-WA SANICHI-WB SANICHI-WC SEACERA-WA SERSOL-WA SIME-C3 SKH-WA SKPETROC15 SKPETROC16

+/(RM)

0.325 0.015 0.050 0.005 0.165 0.135 0.180 0.010 0.010 0.010 0.050 0.225 0.200 0.060 0.365 0.085 0.165 0.005 0.125 0.570 0.380 0.740 0.190 0.010 0.125 0.010 0.185 0.145 0.270 0.125 0.085 0.025 0.070 0.160 0.130 0.005 0.135 0.285 0.015 0.020 0.230 0.175 0.120 0.205 0.125 0.215 0.135 0.050 0.395 0.015 0.215 1.280 0.860 0.030 0.080 0.295 0.045 0.025 0.050 0.075 0.075 0.025 0.020 0.320 0.095 0.145 0.015 0.045 0.150

-0.015 Unch Unch -0.005 Unch 0.005 Unch -0.005 Unch -0.020 -0.005 -0.015 -0.005 Unch -0.005 0.035 -0.005 -0.005 Unch 0.010 -0.005 0.070 Unch -0.025 -0.020 -0.010 -0.010 Unch -0.015 -0.005 -0.015 0.005 Unch Unch 0.010 Unch Unch Unch Unch Unch -0.020 -0.030 -0.020 -0.015 -0.005 Unch 0.005 0.010 0.005 -0.010 0.080 0.020 -0.005 Unch -0.010 -0.005 -0.005 Unch Unch Unch -0.005 Unch Unch -0.025 -0.005 0.020 -0.005 0.005 0.015

VOL PARENT EXE (‘000) PRICE PRICE 22.5 111 8 224.2 190.5 290.3 50.1 109.9 800 100 5727 855.6 0.1 695.2 69.1 1085.5 0.5 160.3 10 14 159 129.5 7 150 36 300 190 687.5 182.6 5520.6 1390 0.1 0.5 903.5 89.3 50 1 87.6 110 30 300 79 20 368 118.9 14.7 7 90.4 76.1 958.1 40 229.2 364.5 410 1170 425.3 108 81866.3 227.5 259.2 413.4 560 6849.1 257.2 40 84.8 135.1 855.2 133

1.060 2.490 1.310 1.310 1.310 1.310 0.765 6.230 8.530 8.530 8.530 8.530 0.790 2.190 1.370 0.225 1.220 1.030 8.690 1.160 1.160 2.280 0.500 1.660 7.780 1.130 1.130 1.130 2.130 2.130 2.130 0.065 0.390 0.695 0.215 0.515 0.515 1.600 0.040 18.460 6.780 6.780 6.780 0.605 0.365 25.140 25.139 22.180 1.360 2.120 2.120 2.120 1.650 2.150 2.830 1.100 0.090 0.090 0.650 0.440 0.385 0.050 0.050 0.990 0.135 7.710 0.075 1.950 1.950

0.900 2.800 1.450 1.680 1.440 2.100 1.000 7.200 10.000 8.800 8.200 8.350 0.800 3.200 1.000 0.250 2.060 1.250 8.000 0.600 1.090 1.890 0.500 2.000 7.050 1.500 1.000 2.300 1.775 2.300 2.350 0.260 1.000 0.710 0.100 0.960 0.500 1.800 0.040 19.300 6.000 6.250 7.300 0.600 0.250 23.000 24.860 24.000 1.000 2.500 1.600 1.100 1.000 2.770 2.500 0.750 0.100 0.100 0.750 0.500 0.500 0.100 0.100 1.000 0.180 7.900 0.100 2.200 1.800

PR’M (%) 15.57 13.05 14.50 28.85 22.52 70.61 54.25 16.21 17.58 3.58 1.99 7.12 26.58 48.86 -0.36 48.89 82.38 22.33 3.57 0.86 26.72 15.35 38.00 22.29 0.26 33.63 4.87 116.37 8.69 25.59 28.29 338.46 174.36 25.18 6.98 87.38 23.30 30.31 37.50 5.63 5.46 2.51 18.29 33.06 2.74 1.75 7.48 10.46 2.57 21.46 0.83 12.26 12.73 31.63 -0.35 -5.00 61.11 38.89 23.08 30.68 49.35 150.00 140.00 33.33 103.70 9.99 53.33 20.90 7.69

EXPIRY DATE 04/09/2020 31/05/2016 30/09/2016 31/03/2016 16/03/2018 21/02/2020 29/06/2018 30/06/2016 31/05/2016 07/03/2016 18/07/2016 15/08/2016 28/11/2022 14/06/2017 31/05/2016 07/10/2020 09/05/2017 29/04/2016 08/06/2016 04/07/2016 23/08/2020 29/12/2017 27/10/2019 31/03/2016 11/03/2016 31/05/2016 08/06/2016 14/09/2018 30/09/2016 29/07/2016 23/11/2016 21/07/2023 02/05/2017 15/12/2020 18/01/2019 19/04/2016 30/05/2018 22/07/2020 20/03/2018 30/06/2016 18/07/2016 31/05/2016 28/10/2016 20/01/2024 27/01/2020 30/06/2016 31/10/2016 30/06/2016 04/12/2020 08/06/2016 07/03/2016 22/08/2019 21/10/2020 31/10/2016 29/04/2016 06/07/2019 25/12/2024 15/02/2019 12/08/2022 29/09/2016 01/12/2023 13/03/2018 24/09/2019 16/05/2017 18/04/2023 30/09/2016 16/01/2017 30/08/2016 31/05/2016

10,172.06 16,188.41

11275

1900

Mar 1, 2010

CLOSE (RM)

14450

2875

Main Market & Ace Market Warrants YEAR LOW

17625

3,087.842

Bursa Malaysia Equity Derivatives YEAR HIGH

+25.96 (+0.95%)

3850

1960

Feb 26, 2016

Index points

20800

2,767.21

2,772.70

2445

9500

Mar 1, 2010

5800

for a second day, for a 1.6% gain in the week. With oil’s steep 1½-year slide, equities’ performance has been tightly linked to the commodity’s daily fluctuations, with investors viewing oil as a proxy for the health of the global economy. With equity markets off to a weak start in 2016 amid concerns about an economic slowdown, investors have been awaiting the US Federal Reserve’s (Fed) next policy move after the central bank raised rates in December. US federal funds futures implied traders see a 36% chance of the Fed raising rates in June and 53% chance in December, both above last Thursday’s levels, according to CME Group’s FedWatch programme. “This information last Friday, while actually good for Main Street, is less than good for a Wall Street that has become addicted to the Fed’s largesse,” said Mark Luschini, chief investment strategist at Janney Montgomery Scott in Philadelphia. “We got some pretty surprising Gross Domestic Produce data, an upward revision, and not too many people had pegged that,” said analysts. — Agencies

Nikkei 225

Index points

4825

2930

16,639.97

10,403.79

Index points

3900

China’s stock markets rebounded, investors in Asia shifted their focus to a gathering of G20 policymakers in Shanghai. Singapore’s Straits Times Index was up 1.8%, recovering from two days of fall and trimming losses in the week to 0.3%. The city state’s better-than-expected factory output in January also lifted sentiment. Jakarta Composite Index advanced 1.6% as foreign investors bought bank stocks such as Bank Rakyat Indonesia and Bank Central Asia. It finished the week up 0.7% amid mixed regional performances. Vietnam was an outperformer on the week, notching up a gain of 2.2% while Thailand jumped 1.7%. Malaysia fell 0.6% on the week and the Philippines posted a loss of 0.3%. MSCI’s gauge of global stock markets was up just 0.1%. The index was set for its biggest twoweek percentage increase since October. Europe’s FTSEurofirst 300 Stock Index tallied a 1.6% rise last Friday, fuelled by strength in mining shares as industrial metals such as copper and aluminium gained. European equities rallied

Shanghai Composite

Euro STOXX 50 Index

Dow Jones

14040

Hogan said investors were already prepared for a weak report on the manufacturing sector, but a reading on the services sector that offsets the soft preliminary reading would be welcomed. However, should the data point to an economy that is gaining traction, it could also reduce enthusiasm for stocks, with a mid-March meeting of the US Federal Open Market Committee on the horizon. “[Payrolls] could actually hamper any further gains in the market,” said Peter Kenny, equity market strategist at Kenny & Co LLC, in Denver. “People will look at that as an indicator that the US Federal Reserve is more than less likely to move on rates, sooner rather than later.” Volatility could also be heightened by politics, with the crucial Super Tuesday nominating contests looming this week.

+48.07 (+0.30%)

8100

Mar 1, 2010

Feb 26, 2016

YEAR HIGH

YEAR LOW

DAY HIGH

DAY LOW

CODE

0.275 0.210 0.255 0.100 0.210 1.050 0.415 1.000 0.135 1.230 0.090 0.230 0.185 1.260 0.270 0.100 0.430 0.385 0.765 0.400 0.710 0.310 0.235 0.345 0.200 0.560 0.490 0.270 0.200 1.200 2.550 0.180 0.027 0.025 0.245 0.680 0.080 0.075 1.050 0.465 0.885 0.400 0.080 0.095 0.155 0.405 0.250 0.070 0.380 0.295 0.150 0.095 0.060 0.115 0.120 0.075 0.160 0.225 0.140 0.225 0.175 0.150 0.120 0.515 0.290 0.280 0.045 0.060 0.135 0.065 0.150 0.120 0.500 0.300 0.270

0.070 0.015 0.135 0.055 0.075 0.265 0.060 0.795 0.040 0.620 0.040 0.065 0.045 0.630 0.090 0.070 0.135 0.110 0.170 0.085 0.170 0.055 0.075 0.135 0.140 0.250 0.205 0.140 0.170 0.360 0.600 0.075 0.010 0.015 0.105 0.300 0.055 0.060 0.100 0.145 0.285 0.135 0.015 0.005 0.040 0.195 0.155 0.005 0.020 0.040 0.045 0.005 0.010 0.045 0.070 0.005 0.040 0.025 0.011 0.022 0.060 0.045 0.030 0.305 0.100 0.130 0.010 0.015 0.030 0.045 0.085 0.055 0.330 0.070 0.110

0.165 0.035 0.225 0.100 0.090 0.755 0.135 0.950 0.100 1.230 0.060 0.165 0.050 0.720 0.125 0.075 0.280 0.260 0.510 0.240 0.430 0.155 0.125 0.220 0.160 0.400 0.320 0.180 0.170 0.460 2.090 0.085 0.010 0.020 0.185 0.435 0.060 0.060 0.120 0.250 0.420 0.160 0.020 0.025 0.080 0.360 0.205 0.010 0.115 0.065 0.060 0.005 0.010 0.050 0.085 0.010 0.090 0.030 0.090 0.135 0.090 0.060 0.045 0.360 0.200 0.175 0.015 0.020 0.040 0.050 0.125 0.065 0.360 0.130 0.125

0.155 0.020 0.225 0.100 0.085 0.740 0.130 0.950 0.080 1.180 0.060 0.160 0.045 0.710 0.110 0.075 0.280 0.250 0.465 0.230 0.400 0.140 0.110 0.215 0.145 0.395 0.320 0.180 0.170 0.450 2.000 0.085 0.010 0.020 0.180 0.415 0.055 0.060 0.110 0.230 0.385 0.150 0.015 0.005 0.060 0.325 0.175 0.010 0.110 0.055 0.055 0.005 0.010 0.050 0.075 0.010 0.090 0.030 0.085 0.130 0.085 0.055 0.045 0.345 0.185 0.165 0.015 0.015 0.040 0.045 0.120 0.065 0.360 0.130 0.120

521817 521819 521820 521821 5218HC 7155WA 0117WA 5242WA 5241WA 7103WA 0129WA 7143WA 1201WB 5211WA 710610 710612 7106C3 7106C4 7106C5 7106C6 7106C7 7106C8 7106C9 7082WB 5012CF 8524WB 534723 534725 534727 7252WA 7034WA 7889WB 7079WB 7079WC 0101WB 8397WC 7113C1 7113C2 7113C3 7113CX 7113CY 7113CZ 5054WB 0118WA 5401CI 5401WA 5042WB 5230CF 514818 514819 514820 514821 514825 5243C1 5243C3 5243CY 5005CJ 0120WA 0069WB 0069WC 6963CA 6963CB 6963CD 6963WA 9679WD 9679WE 5156WC 0095WA 5155WA 0165WA 4677C2 6742CS 6742WB 7028WA 2283WA

WARRANTS SKPETROC17 SKPETROC19 SKPETROC20 SKPETROC21 SKPETRO-HC SKPRES-WA SMRT-WA SOLID-WA SONA-WA SPRITZER-WA SRIDGE-WA STONE-WA SUMATEC-WB SUNWAY-WA SUPERMX-C10 SUPERMX-C12 SUPERMX-C3 SUPERMX-C4 SUPERMX-C5 SUPERMX-C6 SUPERMX-C7 SUPERMX-C8 SUPERMX-C9 SYF-WB TAANN-CF TALIWRK-WB TENAGA-C23 TENAGA-C25 TENAGA-C27 TEOSENG-WA TGUAN-WA THRIVEN-WB TIGER-WB TIGER-WC TMCLIFE-WB TNLOGIS-WC TOPGLOV-C1 TOPGLOV-C2 TOPGLOV-C3 TOPGLOV-CX TOPGLOV-CY TOPGLOV-CZ TRC-WB TRIVE-WA TROP-CI TROP-WA TSRCAP-WB TUNEPRO-CF UEMS-C18 UEMS-C19 UEMS-C20 UEMS-C21 UEMS-C25 UMWOG-C1 UMWOG-C3 UMWOG-CY UNISEM-CJ VIS-WA VIVOCOM-WB VIVOCOM-WC VS-CA VS-CB VS-CD VS-WA WCT-WD WCT-WE XDL-WC XINGHE-WA XINQUAN-WA XOX-WA YTL-C2 YTLPOWR-CS YTLPOWR-WB ZECON-WA ZELAN-WA

Mar 1, 2010

CLOSE (RM)

+/(RM)

0.165 0.030 0.225 0.100 0.085 0.745 0.135 0.950 0.095 1.230 0.060 0.165 0.050 0.720 0.120 0.075 0.280 0.250 0.475 0.230 0.405 0.145 0.110 0.220 0.145 0.395 0.320 0.180 0.170 0.460 2.050 0.085 0.010 0.020 0.185 0.415 0.055 0.060 0.120 0.230 0.395 0.150 0.020 0.025 0.070 0.330 0.205 0.010 0.115 0.060 0.055 0.005 0.010 0.050 0.085 0.010 0.090 0.030 0.085 0.130 0.090 0.055 0.045 0.355 0.190 0.170 0.015 0.020 0.040 0.045 0.125 0.065 0.360 0.130 0.125

0.010 -0.005 0.010 0.025 -0.010 -0.010 0.005 0.050 0.015 0.060 0.010 Unch 0.005 0.010 -0.005 -0.005 -0.010 -0.020 -0.030 -0.020 -0.020 -0.010 -0.015 0.005 -0.035 0.005 Unch -0.005 -0.030 0.010 0.150 -0.005 Unch -0.005 Unch -0.005 -0.005 -0.005 -0.005 -0.020 -0.030 -0.015 Unch 0.010 Unch 0.010 0.025 Unch 0.010 Unch Unch -0.005 Unch -0.010 0.010 Unch Unch Unch -0.005 -0.005 0.005 Unch Unch -0.010 Unch Unch Unch 0.005 Unch Unch -0.010 0.005 Unch -0.005 Unch

Feb 26, 2016

VOL PARENT EXE (‘000) PRICE PRICE 255.3 2956.5 10 100 118.1 397.4 215 30 34722.6 42.4 105 215 970 37.2 586.4 70 50 121.5 1324 410 99.2 1228.7 1481.5 403.5 281.6 289 0.3 59 1.5 71.9 312.8 50 243 5830.9 220.9 150 448.5 25 1327.1 863.5 166 10.1 139.7 59.9 1873.4 470.8 5.1 500 20 2195 1268.1 60 100 120 180 15 120 8.8 4347.5 160 51 129 500 2190.1 280.9 3209.7 64.8 1900 215 8110.6 90 70 16.4 4.3 25.2

1.950 1.700 1.950 1.900 1.950 1.600 1.950 1.980 1.950 1.700 1.280 0.550 0.220 0.180 1.410 0.500 0.460 0.350 2.440 1.180 0.125 0.180 0.380 0.300 0.115 0.175 3.010 2.250 2.920 3.170 2.920 4.000 2.920 2.000 2.920 2.200 2.920 2.100 2.920 2.200 2.920 2.200 2.920 3.000 2.920 3.300 0.575 0.700 5.270 5.500 1.560 1.700 13.180 11.000 13.180 11.500 13.180 13.700 0.460 1.350 3.160 1.500 0.320 0.640 0.050 0.170 0.050 0.080 0.655 0.750 1.190 1.000 5.550 7.000 5.550 7.000 5.550 7.660 5.550 4.625 5.550 5.250 5.550 6.900 0.380 0.610 0.040 0.100 1.130 1.000 1.130 1.000 0.520 0.700 1.190 1.750 1.010 0.930 1.010 1.000 1.010 1.000 1.010 1.350 1.010 1.600 0.980 1.180 0.980 1.070 0.980 1.600 2.240 2.050 0.180 0.250 0.230 0.240 0.230 0.100 1.280 1.380 1.280 1.480 1.280 1.600 1.280 1.650 1.580 1.710 1.580 2.080 0.050 0.115 0.060 0.100 0.435 1.000 0.150 0.200 1.570 1.500 1.470 1.480 1.470 1.140 0.755 1.060 0.220 0.250

Please refer to the bursa malaysia website for the prices of Loan stocks, bonds and overseas structure warrants

PR’M (%) 8.33 1.74 10.90 22.05 -4.10 1.17 43.18 2.84 -3.26 -1.23 92.00 22.37 95.65 -1.33 25.00 52.40 6.85 9.59 4.45 3.70 3.08 22.60 29.97 60.00 18.12 34.29 0.46 0.91 16.20 293.48 12.34 126.56 260.00 100.00 42.75 18.91 38.02 38.02 47.75 8.20 12.39 40.54 65.79 212.50 0.88 17.70 74.04 49.58 9.16 7.92 15.35 35.15 61.88 35.71 22.19 66.33 7.59 55.56 41.30 0.00 28.91 28.52 36.95 56.64 20.25 42.41 160.00 100.00 139.08 63.33 3.50 7.31 2.04 57.62 70.45

EXPIRY DATE 30/09/2016 07/03/2016 18/07/2016 28/11/2016 31/05/2016 27/06/2017 01/08/2017 16/12/2020 30/07/2018 13/12/2016 24/02/2023 21/06/2020 13/11/2018 17/08/2016 31/10/2016 31/01/2017 28/10/2016 28/10/2016 18/07/2016 29/04/2016 31/05/2016 25/08/2016 29/07/2016 11/11/2019 30/09/2016 11/11/2018 07/03/2016 29/04/2016 30/08/2016 29/01/2020 09/10/2019 05/10/2020 23/12/2018 11/02/2021 21/06/2019 26/12/2018 31/01/2017 31/01/2017 15/08/2016 10/08/2016 31/05/2016 28/10/2016 14/07/2016 06/01/2017 31/03/2016 06/12/2019 28/12/2020 08/06/2016 30/08/2016 29/04/2016 18/07/2016 29/04/2016 31/05/2016 28/11/2016 31/10/2016 29/07/2016 29/07/2016 01/09/2016 07/09/2018 22/01/2020 28/10/2016 28/10/2016 29/07/2016 06/01/2019 11/12/2017 27/08/2020 02/07/2018 22/03/2019 24/06/2019 10/02/2019 31/05/2016 30/08/2016 11/06/2018 03/03/2017 25/01/2019

30 Markets

M ON DAY FEB RUARY 29, 2 0 16 • TH EEDGE F I N AN C I AL DAI LY

INSIDER MOVES . TRADING THEMES . EVENTS . FOREX

Trading themes

Insider moves (Filings on Feb 25, 2016) Insider Moves show what substantial shareholders are doing with their stakes, which could be a signal of their views on the company’s outlook. COMPANY

SHARES ACQUIRED (DISPOSED)

7-ELEVEN MALAYSIA AEON CO (M) ALLIANCE FINANCIAL AMMB ANZO ASTRO MALAYSIA BIMB BRITISH AMERICAN TOBACCO (M) CIMB GROUP CIMB GROUP DIALOG GROUP DIGI.COM GAMUDA GENTING PLANTATIONS GOLDIS HARTALEGA HOCK SENG LEE HONG LEONG BANK IGB REAL ESTATE INVEST IHH HEALTHCARE IJM CORPORATION IJM PLANTATIONS IMASPRO CORPORATION INARI AMERTRON IOI CORPORATION IOI PROPERTIES GROUP KPS CONSORTIUM KUALA LUMPUR KEPONG MAH SING GROUP MALAKOFF CORPORATION MALAYAN BANKING MAXIS MMAG ONLY WORLD GROUP ORIENTAL PAVILION REAL ESTATE INVEST PETRONAS CHEMICALS GROUP PETRONAS GAS PPB GROUP PUBLIC BANK RAPID SYNERGY RAPID SYNERGY RHB CAPITAL S P SETIA SAPURAKENCANA PETROLEUM SHELL REFINING COMPANY SIME DARBY SONA PETROLEUM SUNWAY SUNWAY REAL ESTATE INVEST TA ANN TAMBUN INDAH LAND TELEKOM MALAYSIA TENAGA NASIONAL TIGER SYNERGY UMW UOA DEVELOPMENT WAH SEONG CORPORATION WZ SATU YNH PROPERTY YTL CORPORATION

34,600 10,000 (1,009,100) (410,700) 600,000 339,800 74,000 (127,768) (651,000) (2,414,100) (2,818,100) (5,093,600) 50,000 (54,500) (200,000) 207,200 (25,000) (79,100) 277,900 71,700 (588,700) 168,600 (370,000) 1,820,000 (2,166,700) (1,790,100) 110,000 (492,300) (885,500) (2,000,000) (719,400) 875,900 2,000,000 128,500 (80,500) 426,300 (551,500) (389,400) (322,100) 175,500 (75,000) 20,000 (325,000) 252,800 (1,577,300) (506,500) (1,297,600) 3,038,300 59,000 698,400 (33,500) 148,600 (2,018,600) (3,700,000) (10,361,000) (211,500) 333,900 (206,800) 590,000 (253,000) 1,708,100

DIRECTOR/SUBSTANTIAL SHAREHOLDER

GENESIS INVESTMENT MANAGEMENT, LLP MITSUBISHI UFJ FINANCIAL GROUP INC. (JAPAN) EMPLOYEES PROVIDENT FUND BOARD EMPLOYEES PROVIDENT FUND BOARD DATUK CHAI WOON CHET EMPLOYEES PROVIDENT FUND BOARD EMPLOYEES PROVIDENT FUND BOARD MITSUBISHI UFJ FINANCIAL GROUP INC. (JAPAN) MITSUBISHI UFJ FINANCIAL GROUP INC. (JAPAN) EMPLOYEES PROVIDENT FUND BOARD EMPLOYEES PROVIDENT FUND BOARD EMPLOYEES PROVIDENT FUND BOARD EMPLOYEES PROVIDENT FUND BOARD EMPLOYEES PROVIDENT FUND BOARD TAN BOON SENG EMPLOYEES PROVIDENT FUND BOARD EMPLOYEES PROVIDENT FUND BOARD EMPLOYEES PROVIDENT FUND BOARD EMPLOYEES PROVIDENT FUND BOARD EMPLOYEES PROVIDENT FUND BOARD EMPLOYEES PROVIDENT FUND BOARD EMPLOYEES PROVIDENT FUND BOARD CHAN WENG FUI EMPLOYEES PROVIDENT FUND BOARD EMPLOYEES PROVIDENT FUND BOARD EMPLOYEES PROVIDENT FUND BOARD KOH POH SENG EMPLOYEES PROVIDENT FUND BOARD EMPLOYEES PROVIDENT FUND BOARD EMPLOYEES PROVIDENT FUND BOARD EMPLOYEES PROVIDENT FUND BOARD EMPLOYEES PROVIDENT FUND BOARD FIRSTWIDE SUCCESS S/B EMPLOYEES PROVIDENT FUND BOARD ABERDEEN ASSET MGMT PLC & ITS SUBSIDIARIES, UK EMPLOYEES PROVIDENT FUND BOARD EMPLOYEES PROVIDENT FUND BOARD EMPLOYEES PROVIDENT FUND BOARD EMPLOYEES PROVIDENT FUND BOARD EMPLOYEES PROVIDENT FUND BOARD DATO’ YU KUAN CHON DATO’ YU KUAN HUAT EMPLOYEES PROVIDENT FUND BOARD EMPLOYEES PROVIDENT FUND BOARD EMPLOYEES PROVIDENT FUND BOARD EMPLOYEES PROVIDENT FUND BOARD EMPLOYEES PROVIDENT FUND BOARD CREDIT SUISSE SECURITIES (EUROPE) LTD, UK EMPLOYEES PROVIDENT FUND BOARD EMPLOYEES PROVIDENT FUND BOARD DATUK WAHAB HJ DOLAH EMPLOYEES PROVIDENT FUND BOARD EMPLOYEES PROVIDENT FUND BOARD EMPLOYEES PROVIDENT FUND BOARD DATO’ TAN WEI LIAN EMPLOYEES PROVIDENT FUND BOARD EMPLOYEES PROVIDENT FUND BOARD EMPLOYEES PROVIDENT FUND BOARD DATO’ SRI TENGKU UZIR TENGKU DATO’ UBAIDILLAH DATO YU KUAN HUAT EMPLOYEES PROVIDENT FUND BOARD

SHARES HELD AFTER CHANGE

TRANSACTION DATE

73,313,900 273,678,228

17/2 19/2

266,492,640 481,315,837 59,100,000 332,883,000 206,302,901 18,857,730

22/2 22/2 25/2 22/2 22/2 19/2

832,283,396

17 TO 19/2

1,440,137,221 635,321,704 1,038,934,040 278,684,205 106,537,400 74,011,366 127,300,000 35,076,714 291,225,171 224,548,613 713,634,900 497,343,578 102,707,762 2,518,000 62,949,027 523,105,959 333,570,086 66,525,525 131,312,188 241,053,261 872,390,033 1,511,489,883 591,133,500 158,333,824 13,386,700 72,984,200

17 TO 19/2 22/2 22/2 22/2 22/2 25/2 22/2 22/2 22/2 22/2 22/2 22/2 22/2 19/2 22/2 22/2 22/2 19/2 22/2 22/2 22/2 22/2 22/2 24/2 22/2 23/2

186,378,203 22/2 808,810,300 5, 10 TO 12/2 235,916,600 22/2 87,226,079 22/2 583,785,468 22/2 19,612,861 24/2 8,318,700 24/2 1,291,778,268 22/2 158,955,698 22/2 874,615,700 22/2 34,755,547 19 & 22/2 798,261,709 22/2 145,697,900 22/2 101,074,632 25/2 349,826,800 22/2 38,087,723 23 & 24/2 23,652,900 18/2 584,399,236 22/2 970,394,382 22/2 321,499,600 24/2 205,786,193 22/2 87,676,700 22/2 51,582,081 22/2 66,507,447 25/2 125,912,970 752,718,447

25/2 22/2

While every effort is made to ensure accuracy, the information presented is not an exhaustive list and is not an official record of shareholder filings. Direct and indirect shareholdings are combined due to space constraints. Readers who are interested should check the official filings filed with Bursa Malaysia. Note: * denotes Ace Market

Local events to watch out for today • Firefly Airlines Greatest 2015 Giveaway nomic Development in Asia, Finding the contest prize-giving ceremony at Main Leaders in Us & Redefining Success at JC2, Drop-off Area, Ground Floor, Citta Mall, Level 1, New University Building, Sunway Ara Damansara at 9.30am. University, No 5 Jalan Universiti, Bandar • AIA Pension & Asset Management Sunway, Petaling Jaya, Selangor at 2pm. achieved record growth in 2015, out- • Malaysian Global Innovation & Creativity lines key strategies for 2016 at Vibrant Centre (MaGIC) to host a comprehensive Meeting Room, Level 7, Menara AIA, Jalan start-up services platform open day 2016 Ampang, Kuala Lumpur at 11.30am. at MaGIC, Block 3730, Persiaran Apec, • The Center for Asia Leadership launchCyberjaya at 3.30pm. es three books, Entrepreneurship & Eco-

US yield curve

UK yield curve

Stocks closest to year high STOCK

HEKTAR HLIND ATURMJU MAA SKPETROC21 GENTINGC28 SPRITZER SPRITZER-WA INNITY EKIB MCLEAN PIE

Stocks closest to year low

HIGH (RM)

LOW (RM)

CLOSE (RM)

VOLUME ('000)

1.520 6.290 1.240 1.000 0.100 0.105 2.450 1.230 0.575 1.260 0.250 11.000

1.510 6.230 1.130 0.980 0.100 0.095 2.380 1.180 0.500 1.160 0.200 10.780

1.510 6.230 1.190 0.985 0.100 0.105 2.440 1.230 0.575 1.260 0.225 11.000

46 60.4 7352 1182.5 100 449 449.9 42.4 6.3 382.5 3800.1 275.4

This table shows stocks that are trading near their year high. This could suggest a build-up in buying momentum, or the possibility that profit-taking activities could set in later.

STOCK

CARIMIN KPS DRBHCOM KNUSFOR ANNJOO PCHEM-C4 PCHEM-C1 PCHEM-C5 TRIVE-WA DRBHCOMC19 MYEG-CW OFI PUNCAK MMCCORP-CZ IOIPG-CI PUC-WB

HIGH (RM)

LOW (RM)

CLOSE (RM)

VOLUME ('000)

0.480 1.020 1.000 1.370 0.640 0.190 0.230 0.120 0.025 0.095 0.095 2.040 1.080 0.010 0.020 0.035

0.450 0.995 0.980 1.300 0.620 0.175 0.230 0.120 0.005 0.095 0.085 1.990 1.020 0.010 0.020 0.020

0.480 1.000 0.980 1.310 0.630 0.175 0.230 0.120 0.025 0.095 0.085 2.000 1.030 0.010 0.020 0.025

20.9 462.7 4421.3 23.3 441.9 79 300 20 59.9 270 1390 392.1 2026.2 150 500 81866.3

This table shows stocks that are trading near their year low. This could suggest a build-up in selling momentum, or the possibility that bargain hunting could set in later.

Foreign exchange rates NZ

NZ $ EURO

EURO

0.606 1.649

US

SWISS

BRIT CANADA BRUNEI S’PORE

UAE

INA

INDIA

JAPAN NORWAY

PHIL

QATAR

SAUDI SWEDEN

0.896

0.933

0.933

0.930

2.7961

4.337

51.949

4.522

2.436

8,862

45.581

75.599

5.758

31.483

2.415

2.487

5.670

23.677

5.156

1.478

1.540

1.540

1.534

4.6119

7.153

85.685

7.459

4.018

14,618

75.181

124.693

9.497

51.928

3.983

4.102

9.353

39.052

8.505 7.775

1.004

STERLING £

2.093

1.269

1.388

1.383

CANADA $

1.116

0.677

0.740

0.738

0.533

BRUNEI $

1.071

0.649

0.710

0.708

0.512

0.960

SINGAPORE $

1.071

0.649

0.710

0.708

0.512

0.960

1.000

AUSTRALIA $

1.076

0.652

0.713

0.711

0.514

0.964

1.004

1.004

MALAYSIA RM

0.358

0.217

0.237

0.236

0.171

0.320

0.334

0.334

23.059

13.980

15.293

15.236

11.019

20.659

21.525

1.925

1.167

1.277

1.272

0.920

1.725

1.797

100 DANISH KRONER

22.113

13.406

14.665

14.611

10.567

19.811

100 UAE DIRHAM

41.052

24.889

27.226

27.125

19.618

1000 INA RUPIAH

0.113

0.068

0.075

0.075

0.054

100 INDIA RUPEE

2.194

1.330

1.455

1.450

1.048

0.996

0.721

1.351

1.407

1.407

1.402

4.2160

6.539

78.330

6.819

3.673

13,363

68.727

113.989

8.682

47.470

3.641

3.750

8.550

35.700

0.723

1.356

1.413

1.413

1.407

4.2317

6.563

78.622

6.844

3.687

13,413

68.983

114.414

8.714

47.647

3.655

3.764

8.582

35.833

7.804

1.875

1.953

1.953

1.946

5.8510

9.075

108.707

9.463

5.097

18,545

95.380

158.195

12.049

65.879

5.053

5.204

11.866

49.545

10.790

1.042

1.042

1.038

3.1209

4.840

57.984

5.048

2.719

9,892

50.875

84.381

6.427

35.140

2.695

2.776

6.329

26.427

5.755

1.000

0.996

2.9954

4.646

55.652

4.845

2.610

9,494

48.830

80.987

6.168

33.727

2.587

2.664

6.075

25.364

5.524

0.996

2.9954

4.646

55.652

4.845

2.610

9,494

48.830

80.987

6.168

33.727

2.587

2.664

6.075

25.364

5.524

3.0073

4.664

55.873

4.864

2.620

9,532

49.024

81.309

6.193

33.861

2.597

2.675

6.099

25.465

5.546

0.333

1.0000

1.551

18.579

1.617

0.871

3,170

16.302

27.037

2.059

11.259

0.864

0.889

2.028

8.468

1.844

21.525

21.439

64.4750

1,198

104.280

56.169

1,743

132.774

725.955

55.685

57.347

130.754

545.959

118.898

1.797

1.790

5.3824

8.348

8.705

4.689

17,060

87.741

145.524

11.084

60.603

4.649

4.787

10.915

45.577

9.926

20.641

20.641

20.560

61.8290

95.90

53.864

195,971

1,007.91

1,672

127.32

696.16

53.40

54.99

125.39

523.55

114.02

36.780

38.321

38.321

38.169 114.7867

178.03

2,133

185.65

1,871

3,104

236.38

1,292

99.14

102.10

232.79

971.99

211.68

0.101

0.105

0.105

0.105

0.3155

0.489

5.862

0.510

0.275

5.143

8.530

0.650

3.552

0.272

0.281

0.640

2.672

0.582

1.966

2.048

2.048

2.040

6.1344

9.514

113.972

9.922

5.344

165.857

12.633

69.070

5.298

5.456

12.440

51.945

11.312

1,149

204,358 1,051.040

363,825 19,443

1.323

0.802

0.877

0.874

0.632

1.185

1.235

1.235

1.230

3.6986

5.736

68.717

5.982

3.222

11,723

60.293

17.367

10.529

11.518

11.475

8.299

15.560

16.212

16.212

16.147

48.5600

75.316

902

78.539

42.305

153,914

791.601

1,313

7.617

2.953

41.644

3.194

3.290

7.501

31.319

6.821

546.761

41.939

43.191

98.479

411.194

89.549

3.176

1.926

2.107

2.099

1.518

2.846

2.965

2.965

8.8814

13.775

165.009

14.364

7.737

28,150

144.780

240.129

18.290

100 QATAR RIYAL

41.410

25.106

27.463

27.362

19.789

37.100

38.655

38.655

38.502 115.7860

179.583

2,151

187.268

100.871

366,992

1,887

3,131

238.439

100 SAUDI RIYAL

40.209

24.378

26.667

26.568

19.215

36.025

37.534

37.534

37.386 112.4297

174.377

2,089

181.840

97.947

356,354

1,833

3,040

231.527

1,266

97.101

100 SWEDISH KRONOR

17.635

10.692

11.696

11.653

8.428

15.800

16.462

16.462

16.397

49.3100

76.479

916.140

79.752

42.958

156,292

803.828

1,333

101.544

555.205

42.587

43.859

4.224

2.561

2.801

2.791

2.018

3.784

3.943

3.943

3.927

11.8095

18.316

219.411

19.100

10.288

37,431

192.513

319.296

24.319

132.969

10.199

10.504

23.950

19.394

11.758

12.862

12.815

9.268

17.375

18.103

18.103

18.032

54.2272

84.106 1,007.497

87.705

47.242

171,877

883.985

1,466

111.670

610.570

46.834

48.232

109.972

100 HK$

HK

0.788

0.914

100 THAI BAHT

THAI

0.478

0.918

100 PHILIPPINE PESO

DENM’K

1.090

1.508

100 NORWEGIAN KRONER

BANGL’H

0.661

1.513

100 JAPAN YEN

CHINA

1.094

US $

100 CHINESE RMB

M’SIA

0.663

SWISS FR

100 BANGLAD’H TAKA

AUST

7.671 1,304

7.900

18.011

75.206

16.378

102.985

234.812

980.448

213.520

952.028

207.331

417.545

90.932

228.006

21.778 459.183

Note: Run your finger down the left-hand side until you reach the country of origin you plan to exchange. Then move your finger until that line intersects with the vertical column of the currency you wish to buy. The figure is how much you will get. The above rates are subject to change and provided by Thompson Reuters.

Markets 3 1

M ON DAY F E B RUA RY 29 , 2016 • T HEED G E FINA NCIA L DA I LY

FUTURES . MONEY MARKET . COMMODITIES

Money market

Index futures Long Rolls - KLCI futures

FKLI Index points 1980

Open Interest

1,665.00 90000 (+5.00)

Index points

-3.00

18.00

US Dollar

Klibor

USD Index

Implied interest rate (%)

102.00

(-2.00)

4.5

98.148

3.73

(+0.861)

1790

68000

4.75

94.25

1600

46000

-8.50

86.50

1410

24000

-21.75

78.75

(Unch) 3.5

2000

1220 Jan 4, 2010

Feb 26, 2016

2.5

71.00

-35.00 Jan 4, 2010

FBM KLCI futures end higher in line with cash market

Feb 26, 2016

FBM KLCI futures INDEX AND FUTURES CONTRACT

LAST

CHANGE

VOLUME

OPEN CHANGE IN INTEREST OPEN INTEREST

The FBM KLCI futures contracts on Bursa FBMKLCI 1,663.44 5.28 1.48M 1,665.00 5.00 9,445 32,373 -337 Malaysia Derivatives finished marginally FEB 16 1,662.00 3.00 7,937 33,307 7,575 higher last Friday, tracking the cue from the MAR 16 JUN 16 1,651.50 2.50 44 211 29 underlying cash market. SEP 16 1,644.00 4.00 2 31 1 The benchmark FBM KLCI finished 5.28 TOTAL 17,428 65,922 7,268 points higher at 1,663.44. BID OFFER CLOSE Spot month February 2016 was five points FUTURES ROLL OVER -2.5 -3.5 -3.0 better at 1,665; March 2016 gained three FEB/MAR points to 1,662; June 2016 added 2.5 points FUTURES FAIR VALUE DAYS TO EXPIRY KLIBOR DIVIDEND FAIR VALUE to 1,651.5; and September 2016 rose four CONTRACT FEB 16 4 0.46 5.65 -5.19 points to 1,644. MAR 16 35 5.22 10.29 -5.07 Turnover shrank to 17,428 lots from 29,687 ROLL’S FAIR 0.12 lots last Thursday, while open interest narrowed to 65,922 contracts from 73,834 contracts previously. Singapore’s Straits Times Index was up 1.8%, recovering from two days of falls and week, notching up a gain of 2.2% while Thaitrimming losses on the week to 0.3%. land jumped 1.7%, and the Philippines postVietnam was an outperformer on the ed a loss of 0.3%. — Agencies

Commodities

CPO vs Soyoil Open Interest

4200

200000

3450 2700 1950

2,544 1200

Jan 6, 2008

Feb 26, 2016

US dollar gains on upbeat economic growth data The US dollar rose broadly last Friday after mostly upbeat US economic data renewed expectations that the US Federal Reserve (Fed) could raise interest rates again this year. The US dollar index rose 0.86% to a threeweek high of 98.26. The euro was down 0.8% against the US dollar at US$1.0931 after falling to a three-week low of US$1.0912. The US dollar index, a measure of the greenback’s value against six major currencies, posted its best weekly performance since November. Against the yen, the US dollar rose to a more-than-one-week high. Last Friday’s data showed that US economic growth slowed in 4QFY15, while consumer spending rose. Those reports, if followed by another robust US non-farm payrolls report this week, should put rate hikes back on the Fed’s agenda. — Reuters

1.5 Oct 1, 2000

Feb 26, 2016

Klibor MONTH

SETTLEMENT PRICE

MAR6 APR6 MAY6 JUN6 SEP6 DEC6 MAR7 JUN7 SEP7 DEC7 MAR8 JUN8 SEP8 DEC8 MAR9 JUN9 SEP9 DEC9 MAR0 JUN0 SEP0 DEC0 TOTAL

CHANGE

96.27 96.26 96.27 96.27 96.27 96.24 96.24 96.19 96.15 96.10 96.10 96.10 96.10 96.10 96.10 96.10 96.10 96.10 96.10 96.10 96.10 96.10

— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

VOLUME

OPEN INTEREST

— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — 0

120 — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — 0

CPO prices react to various factors including soyoil prices, weather conditions and stockpiles. Open interest shows either increasing or decreasing market participation.

CPO & Open Interest CPO RM/tonne

Oct 2, 2006

(+9)

Crude Oil

Gold

CPO RM/tonne

Soyoil US$/Ibs

US$/bbl

US$/troy oz

6400

2,917 0.7300

155.00

(RM0.3145/tonne)

1980

32.78 (-0.29)

152500

5100

0.5475

121.25

105000

3800

0.3650

87.50

1340

57500

2500

0.1825

53.75

1020

10000

Feb 26, 2016

Palm oil rises on weaker ringgit, but set for weekly fall

(+9)

Jan 6, 2008

0.0000

Feb 26, 2016

CPO futures CONTRACT

MAR-16 APR-16 MAY-16 JUN-16 JUL-16

LAST

2,462 2,518 2,544 2,537 2,518

CHANGE

-9 1 9 5 3

VOLUME

946 2,701 30,070 8,958 5,675

OPEN CHANGE IN INTEREST OPEN INTEREST

6,138 23,744 88,297 34,292 39,266

1,220.40 (-18.40)

2,544 1200

1660

-132 -355 1,673 1,682 721

Malaysian palm oil futures were headed for a second session of gains last Friday on the back of a weaker ringgit, but the benchCPO/SOYOIL mark contract was still set for a weekly fall CPO FUTURES INDICATIVE ROLL-OVER FUTURES BASIS (USD) of around 2%. CURRENT -79.22 MAR/APR -56 The palm oil contract for May delivery on MAR/MAY 3 MONTHS AVERAGE -94.86 -82 Bursa Malaysia Derivatives was up 0.3% at MAR/JUN 6 MONTHS AVERAGE -96.82 -75 RM2,544 a tonne at the close of trade. APR/MAY -26 Traded volume was 19,403 lots of 25 SGS & ITS EXPORT ESTIMATES (TONNES) SHIPMENT DAYS DEC’2015 JAN’2016 FEB’2016 tonnes each. 299/280 322/323 197/250 “The market is up tracking the ringgit last 1 - 10TH DAYS 464/467 489/487 420/408 Friday,” said a trader based in Kuala Lum- 1- 15TH DAYS DAYS 744/728 666/667 582/595 pur. “Also we expect some correction after 11 -- 20TH 25TH DAYS 1.015/1.010 931/925 781/788 the week-long sell-off.” FULL MONTH 1.272/1.272 1.149/1.145 —/— Palm futures fell for five consecutive MALAYSIAN PALM OIL BOARD OCT’15 NOV’15 DEC’15 JAN’16 sessions from Feb 18 to Feb 22 on concerns 2,037 1,653 1,399 1,130 over an unexpected rise in production in the PRODUCTION 1,712 1,499 1,483 1,279 first 20 days of February, but edged up last EXPORT STOCKS 2,834 2,908 2,631 2,308 Thursday on expectations of a stock decline MPOB Palm oil physical at the end of the month. FEB’2016 MAC’2016 APR’2016 The weaker ringgit, the currency palm oil (IN RM/TON) DELD 2,460 2,464 2,500 is traded in, also supported the vegetable CPO PK EX-MILL 2.055 2,070 2,080 oil in early trade last Friday. It fell 0.1% to CPKO DELD 4,224 4,224 4,232 4.22 against the US dollar, making palm oil RBD P.OIL FOB 2,537 2,549 2,558 cheaper for holders of foreign currencies. RBD P.OLEIN FOB 2,566 2,575 2,583 2,380 2,410 2,423 Palm oil could approach resistance at RBD P.STEARIN FOB RM2,549 a tonne as the bounce from the Feb MPOB FFB REF PRICE (MILL GATE PRICE) GRADE A GRADE B GRADE C 24 low of RM2,517 has not been completed, REGION OER (RM/TON) OER(RM/TON) OER (RM/TON) said Wang Tao, a Reuters market analyst. NORTH 20.00% 532 19.00% 509 18.00% 485 In competing vegetable oil markets, the SOUTH 20.00% 540 19.00% 516 18.00% 492 20.00% 537 19.00% 513 18.00% 489 May soybean oil contract on the Dalian CENTRAL Commodity Exchange lost 0.1% while the EAST COAST 20.00% 537 19.00% 513 18.00% 489 22.00% 518 21.00% 496 20.00% 474 Chicago soyoil contract rose 0.6%. — Reuters SABAH SARAWAK 22.00% 527 21.00% 503 20.00% 481

20.00 Apr 10, 2007

700 Feb 26, 2016

Oil prices fall on profittaking and Wall Street gains Oil price fell last Friday as investors cashed out big weekly profits after a rally driven by disruptions to crude supplies and Wall Street’s gains from US economic data. US Brent crude settled down 19 US cents at US$35.10. It hit a high of US$37 earlier, a peak since Jan 5. US crude settled down 29 US cents at US$32.78 a barrel, after gaining almost US$1.70 earlier. For the week, US Brent was up more than 6% after rising for four days. US crude rose 11% on the week, its steepest weekly rise since August. Prices turned negative soon after the release of weekly US oil rig data by industry firm Baker Hughes that showed a 10th weekly drop in the rig count. The data was positive to oil, but traders and investors chose to lock in profits. — Reuters

Centrifuged Latex

Aug 31, 2008

Commodities AGRICULTURE

UNIT

EXCHANGE

RM/TON SEN/KG USC/BSH USC/BSH USC/BSH USC/IBS US$/TON USC/IBS USC/IBS USC/IBS

MDEX MRB CBOT CBOT CBOT CME NYBOT NYBOT NYBOT NYC

2,544 471.50 354.50 855.00 443.25 137.225 2,878 115.30 14.01 57.46

9 -0.50 -1.00 -4.00 -2.00 -0.125 -61 -0.85 -0.19 -0.30

US$/TON USC/IBS US$/TROY OZ US$/TROY OZ US$/TROY OZ USC/TROY OZ RMB/TON RMB/TON

KLTM CMX CMX NYMEX NYMEX CMX SHF SHF

16,030 2.1265 1,220.40 915.30 482.45 14.71 11,325 14,140

80 0.05 -18.40 -11.80 -1.10 -0.48 25 115

LIGHT CRUDE OIL US$/BBL HEATING OIL USC/GAL NATURAL GAS US$/MMBTU BRENT CRUDE US$/BBL GAS OIL US$/TON

NYMEX NYMEX NYMEX ICE ICE

CRUDE PALM OIL RUBBER CORN SOYBEANS WHEAT LIVE CATTLE COCOA COFFEE SUGAR COTTON

METAL & PRECIOUS METALS TIN COPPER GOLD PLATINUM PALLADIUM SILVER ALUMINIUM ZINC

ENERGY 32.78 -0.29 1.0668 -0.0180 1.873 0.006 35.10 -0.19 325.25 18.00

Sen/Kg

1100

1700

900

1325

368.50

950

(+3.00)

500

471.50 (-0.50)

575

300 Jan 7, 2007

LAST PRICE CHANGE

Rubber - M’sia SMR 20

Sen/Kg

700

Feb 26, 2016

200

Feb 26, 2016

Jan 7, 2007

Feb 26, 2016

Markets

32

M ON DAY FEB RUARY 29, 2 0 16 • TH EEDGE F I N AN C I AL DAI LY

F U T U R E S . M O N E Y M A R K E T . C O M M O D I T I E S PA G E 3 1

YOUR DAILY FINANCIAL MARKET S ROUNDUP

I N S I D E R M OV E S . T R A D I N G T H E M E S . E V E N T S . FO R E X PA G E 3 0 G L O BA L M A R K E T S PA G E 2 9 M A I N M A R K E T . A C E M A R K E T L I ST I N G PA G E 2 5

RESEARCH: TAI TS [[email protected]; SUGUMARAN [[email protected]]

1,663.44

5.28

5,690.60

28.23

2,649.38

45.98

16,188.41

48.07

19,364.15

STOCK

Index point

1,665.00 (+5.00)

KLCI futures

KL Composite Index

1,663.44

(+5.28)

8:45 9:30

10:30

11:30

12:45

14:30

15:30

16:30 17:15

Daily FBM KLCI Moving average - 20-day

KL Composite Index 1950.0

PUC SONA-WA DGB CIMB HSI-C17 GLOTEC LUSTER AAX-WA HSI-C19 GESHEN DOLMITE KGROUP-WA KGROUP ASIAPAC PETRONM WELLCAL

VOLUME ('000)

CHANGE (%)

CHANGE (RM)

CLOSE (RM)

HIGH (RM)

LOW (RM)

103,116 34,723 28,225 21,884 20,451 17,239 16,128 14,104 10,106 9,734 9,507 8,770 7,290 6,300 6,240 6,222

-10.00 18.75 18.18 5.18 24.44 10.00 0.00 -7.69 25.93 -19.61 -22.33 0.00 8.33 -7.69 -14.04 -6.76

-0.010 0.015 0.010 0.220 0.055 0.005 0.000 -0.005 0.035 -0.500 -0.115 0.000 0.005 -0.015 -0.980 -0.190

0.090 0.095 0.065 4.470 0.280 0.055 0.075 0.060 0.170 2.050 0.400 0.015 0.065 0.180 6.000 2.620

0.110 0.100 0.070 4.480 0.300 0.055 0.075 0.070 0.175 2.240 0.450 0.015 0.065 0.195 6.700 2.650

0.085 0.080 0.060 4.320 0.245 0.050 0.070 0.060 0.145 1.850 0.380 0.015 0.055 0.175 5.760 2.450

Table above is from Reuters Volume break 3x 5-day average volume, meaning the total number of shares traded for a particular counter on the previous trading day is more than triple the average volume for the last 5 trading days. The table captures the build-up of interest in these companies and is thus a gauge of market expectations for these counters.

1,663.44 (+5.28)

1667.5

FBM KLCI to remain steady, trend higher on firming ringgit

1,657.17

1385.0

1102.5

820.0 Jan 2, 2008

Feb 26, 2016

900

600

300

0

Volume (’mil)

FBM KLCI futures CONTRACT

SETTLEMENT

CHANGE

HIGH

LOW

FEB 16 MAR 16 JUN 16

1,665.00 1,662.00 1,651.50

5.00 3.00 2.50

1,669.00 1,668.50 1,657.50

1,658.50 1,656.50 1,647.00

KLCI POINTS

CHANGE (RM)

CLOSE (RM)

VOLUME ('000)

3.16 1.51 1.17 0.93 0.81 0.60 0.52 0.48 0.45 0.39 -0.36 -0.38 -0.41 -1.08 -1.81 -2.67 3.32 1.96 5.28

0.220 0.240 0.110 0.280 0.160 0.060 0.080 0.240 0.060 0.030 -0.070 -0.030 -0.030 -0.080 -0.110 -0.180

4.470 8.000 7.710 22.180 4.500 1.950 18.460 16.060 8.690 5.000 5.350 6.230 6.500 6.780 8.530 5.800

21884.2 5112.8 5438.4 763.8 3307.1 8468.2 7407.6 672.1 5681.0 7893.6 1107.5 3686.7 6759.8 11286.7 20859.8 5686.8

FBM KLCI sensitivity* CIMB GRP GENTING SIME DARBY PETRONAS GAS AMMB HLDGS SAPURA-KENCANA PUBLIC BANK PPB GROUP MISC BERHAD DIGI.COM RHB CAPITAL MAXIS BERHAD IHH HEALTHCARE PETRONAS CHEMICAL MAYBANK BHD AXIATA GROUP SUB-TOTAL OTHERS GRAND TOTAL

* How stock price changes affected the index on the previous trading day

15.70

KLCI FUTURES 1681.50

13.50

STI 2657.57

43.78

RM/USD 4.1600

CPO RM2598.00

15.00

OIL US$35.38

0.88

GOLD US$1202.50

8.40

PP 9974/08/2013 (032820) PENINSULAR MALAYSIA RM1.60 (INCLUSIVE OF 6% GST)

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DOW JONES S&P 500 NASDAQ 100 FTSE 100 AUSTRALIA CHINA HONG KONG INDIA

CLOSE

CHANGE

16,639.97 1,948.05 4,235.62 6,096.01 4,879.96 2,767.21 19,364.15 23,154.30

-57.32 -3.65 -5.44 83.21 -1.22 25.96 475.40 178.30

INDONESIA JAPAN KOREA PHILIPPINES SINGAPORE TAIWAN THAILAND VIETNAM

CLOSE

CHANGE

4,733.15 16,188.41 1,920.16 6,771.30 2,649.38 8,411.16 1,343.07 566.11

74.83 48.07 1.59 2.04 45.98 45.30 9.65 3.29

Email: [email protected] Fax: (03) 7721 8282

CHANGE (RM)

CHANGE (%)

PRICE (RM)

PE RATIO

DIVIDEND YIELD (%)

103,116.1 81,866.3 42,858.6 41,075.7 40,879.2 36,370.4 35,772.3 34,722.6 30,346.3 28,224.6 23,414.3 21,884.2 20,859.8 20,450.6 20,427.7 18,674.1 17,354.5 17,238.7 16,697.4 16,244.4

-0.010 UNCH -0.120 -0.050 -0.005 0.005 -0.015 0.015 UNCH 0.010 0.005 0.220 -0.110 0.055 0.025 -0.005 -0.005 0.005 -0.010 -0.010

-10.00 UNCH -28.57 -3.47 -6.67 3.45 -6.12 18.75 UNCH 18.18 11.11 5.18 -1.27 24.44 11.36 -2.13 -2.50 10.00 -2.41 -3.64

0.090 0.025 0.300 1.390 0.070 0.150 0.230 0.095 0.100 0.065 0.050 4.470 8.530 0.280 0.245 0.230 0.195 0.055 0.405 0.265

18.87 — — — — 13.81 — — 13.33 — 12.86 16.10 11.37 — — 75.81 6.80 — 2.41 8.96

0.00 0.00 0.00 2.08 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 1.88 6.60 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 2.41 0.00

Top gainers and losers (ranked by RM) UP AEONCR PETGAS GENTING PPB CIMB PANAMY PETDAG PESTECH TGUAN AJI AMBANK PIE

CLOSE

CHANGE (RM)

11.720 22.180 8.000 16.060 4.470 25.200 25.140 6.460 3.160 9.170 4.500 11.000

0.280 0.280 0.240 0.240 0.220 0.200 0.200 0.190 0.180 0.170 0.160 0.160

0.085 0.025 0.025 0.025 0.065 0.120 0.215 0.015 0.090 0.015

70.00 66.67 66.67 66.67 62.50 60.00 59.26 50.00 50.00 50.00

DOWN CLOSE

CHANGE (RM)

PETRONM DIN040000223 GESHEN NESTLE ULICORP TAANN HSI-HS AIRPORT HARTA KOSSAN BAT HSI-HU

6.000 97.850 2.050 74.240 5.020 5.270 1.370 5.880 4.600 6.340 56.640 1.220

-0.980 -0.950 -0.500 -0.320 -0.300 -0.290 -0.280 -0.280 -0.250 -0.250 -0.240 -0.220

MCLEAN-WB TRIVE-WA TESLA-C2 HSI-C15 HSI-C13 GENTINGC24 PMETAL-CM STERPRO-WA HSI-C16 GAMUDA-C22

MAYBANKC15 FBMKLCI-H7 MRCB-C5 UEMS-C21 MHB-CX MAHSING-CZ IRIS-WB INIX-WA PMETAL-CL IRIS-WA

0.010 0.015 0.010 0.005 0.005 0.005 0.015 0.015 0.015 0.015

-66.67 -57.14 -50.00 -50.00 -50.00 -50.00 -40.00 -40.00 -40.00 -33.33

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KUALA LUMPUR: The FBM KLCI is expected to remain steady and trend higher this week, riding on the firming ringgit and improved local investor sentiment. The US dollar jumped last Friday and Wall Street’s stock rally faded as fresh economic data kept alive US Federal Reserve (Fed) rate increases, while oil prices turned negative late in the session, according to Reuters. The S&P 500 ended slightly lower, but finished the week up 1.6%. Europe’s FTSEurofirst 300 stock index tal- Top gainers and losers (ranked by percentage) lied a 1.6% rise last Friday, fuelled by strength in mining UP CHANGE DOWN CHANGE shares as industrial metals such as copper and aluminium CLOSE (%) CLOSE (%) gained, it said. FLONIC-WA 0.010 100.00 IOIPG-CI 0.020 -78.95 AffinHwang Investment Bank vice president and head 0.010 100.00 MMCCORP-CZ 0.010 -71.43 of retail research Datuk Dr Nazri Khan said despite a big GTRONIC-CE MCLEAN-WB 0.085 70.00 MAYBANKC15 0.010 -66.67 drop in China Shanghai stock market and ‘Britain Exit Eu- TRIVE-WA 0.025 66.67 FBMKLCI-H7 0.015 -57.14 ropean Union’ fears, he expects the FBM KLCI to remain TESLA-C2 0.025 66.67 MRCB-C5 0.010 -50.00 steady and trend higher driven by the improved ringgit, HSI-C15 0.025 66.67 UEMS-C21 0.005 -50.00 0.065 62.50 MHB-CX 0.005 -50.00 rising oil, breakouts in Wall Street on potential global cen- HSI-C13 0.120 60.00 MAHSING-CZ 0.005 -50.00 tral bank stimulus and growing conviction on the absence GENTINGC24 PMETAL-CM 0.215 59.26 IRIS-WB 0.015 -40.00 of Fed interest rate hikes in the near term. STERPRO-WA 0.015 50.00 INIX-WA 0.015 -40.00 Nazri, who is also president of the Malaysian Associa- HSI-C16 0.090 50.00 PMETAL-CL 0.015 -40.00 tion of Technical Analysts, said that on the technical front, GAMUDA-C22 0.015 50.00 IRIS-WA 0.015 -33.33 the local benchmark FBM KLCI has corrected 20.1% since July 2014, before scoring an impressive 10% rally between Top gainers and losers - warrants (ranked by percentage) Aug 25 and year to date, led by two best-performing sectors, UP CHANGE DOWN CHANGE namely Technology & Industrial Product sectors, which CLOSE (%) CLOSE (%) benefit from the weaker ringgit. — By Surin Murugiah FLONIC-WA 0.010 100.00 IOIPG-CI 0.020 -78.95 GTRONIC-CE 0.010 100.00 MMCCORP-CZ 0.010 -71.43 World equity indices

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